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THE AGRICULTURAL 

AND TECHNICAL 
COLLEGE OF 
NORTH CAROLINA 



AT GREENSBORO 




1963 - 1964 
BULLETIN 




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THE AGRICULTURAL 

AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE 

OF NORTH CAROLINA 



Greensboro 




VOL. 54, NO. 1 



FEBRUARY, 1963 



THE BULLETIN — Published four times each year in February, May, August and 
November by The Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina at 
Greensboro. 

Second Class Postage Paid at Greensboro, North Carolina 



Archives 

F. D. Bluford Library 

N. C. A & T State Univsrsiiy 

Greensboro, N. C. 27411 



THE BULLETIN OF 

THE AGRICULTURAL 

AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE 

OF NORTH CAROLINA 

(CO-EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION) 



SIXTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE 
1962-63 

WITH ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1963-64 



GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 







A * 






1 1 






f S 


II 






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HISTORICAL STATEMENT 

The Agricultural and Technical College was established as the 
"A. and M. College for the Colored Race" by an act of the General 
Assembly of North Carolina ratified March 9, 1891. The act read in 
part : 

That the leading object of the institution shall be to teach 
practical Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts and such 
branches of learning as relate thereto, not excluding academ- 
ical and classical instruction. 
The College began operation during the school year 1890-1891, be- 
fore the passage of the state law creating it. This curious circumstance 
arose out of the fact that the Morrill Act passed by Congress in 1890 
earmarked the proportionate funds to be allocated in bi-racial school 
systems to the two races. The A. and M. College for the White Race 
was established by the State Legislature in 1889 and was ready to re- 
ceive its share of funds provided by the Morrill Act in the Fall of 

1890. Before the college could receive these funds, however, it was 
necessary to make provisions for Colored students. Accordingly, the 
Board of Trustees of the A. and M. College in Raleigh was em- 
powered to make temporary arrangements for these students. A plan 
was worked out with Shaw University in Raleigh where the College 
operated as an annex to Shaw University during the years 1890- 

1891, 1891-1892, and 1892-1893. 

The law of 1891 also provided that the College would be located 
in such city or town in the State as would make to the Board of 
Trustees a suitable proposition that would serve as an inducement 
for said location. A group of interested citizens in the city of Greens- 
boro donated fourteen acres of land for a site and $11,000 to aid in 
constructing buildings. This amount was supplemented by an appro- 
priation of $2,500 from the General Assembly. The first building was 
completed in 1893 and the College opened in Greensboro during the 
fall of that year. 

In 1915 the name of the institution was changed to The Agricultural 
and Technical College of North Carolina by an Act of the State Legis- 
lature. 

The scope of the college program has been enlarged to take care of 
new demands. The General Assembly authorized the institution to 
grant the Master of Science degree in education and certain other 
fields in 1939. The first Master's degree was awarded in 1941. The 
School of Nursing was established by an Act of the State Legisla- 
ture in 1953 and the first class was graduated in 1957. 

The General Assembly repealed previous acts describing the pur- 
pose of the College in 1957, and re-defined its purpose as follows: 
"The primary purpose of the College shall be to teach the 
Agricultural and Technical Arts and Sciences and such 
branches of learning as relate thereto; the training of 
teachers, supervisors, and administrators for the public 
schools of the State, including the preparation of such 
teachers, supervisors and administrators for the Master's de- 
gree. Such other programs of a professional or occupational 
nature may be offered as shall be approved by the North 
Carolina Board of Higher Education, consistent with the ap- 
propriations made therefor." 
Five presidents have served the institution since it was established. 
They are as follows: Dr. J. O. Crosby (1892-1896), Dr. James B. 
Dudley, (1896-1925), Dr. F. D. Bluford, (1925-1955), Dr. Warmoth 
T. Gibbs, (1956-1960), and the current president, Dr. Samuel DeWitt 
Proctor, who began his duties July 1, 1960. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



FALL QUARTER 

Pre-Session Faculty Institute 
Freshman Students Report 
Registration, Freshman 
Registration, Upperclassman 
Classes Begin 
Last day for making changes 

in schedules 
FALL QUARTER CONVOCATION 
Pre-Registration, Winter Quarter 
THANKSGIVING HOLIDAYS 
Fall Quarter Examinations 



Sept. 5, 6 — Thursday, Friday 

Sept. 8 — Sunday 

Sept. 12— Thursday 

Sept. 13, 14 — Friday, Saturday 

Sept. 16 — Monday 

Sept. 23— Monday 

Sept. 24— Tuesday 

Oct. 17— Thursday 

Nov. 28, 29, 30— Thurs., Fri., Sat. 

Dec. 2, 3, 4— Mon., Tues., Wed. 



WINTER QUARTER 

Registration, Winter Quarter Dec. 

Classes Begin Dec. 
Last clay for making changes 

in schedules Dec. 

CHRISTMAS HOLIDAYS BEGIN Dec. 

Classes resume Jan. 

Pre-Registration, Spring Quarter Jan. 
WINTER QUARTER CONVOCATION Jan. 



Winter Quarter Examinations 



6, 7 — Friday, Saturday 
9 — Monday 

14 — Saturday 

18— Wed. (After last class) 

2, 1964— Thursday 

9— Thursday 

21— Tuesday 



March 3, 4, 5,— Tues., Wed., Thurs. 



1963 



JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 91011 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 2) 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 


12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 2! 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 



1963-1964 



SPRING QUARTER 

Registration, Spring Quarter 

Classes Begin 

SPRING QUARTER CONVOCATION 

(HONORS' DAY) 
Last day for making changes 

in schedule 
EASTER HOLIDAYS 
Classes Resume 

Pre-Registration, Fall Quarter 
Senior Day 

BACCALAUREATE EXERCISES 
Spring Quarter Examinations 
COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES 



March 9, 10 — Monday, Tuesday 
March 11 — Wednesday 

March 17 — Tuesday 

March 18 — Wednesday 

March 27, 28, 30— Fri., Sat., Mon. 

March 31 — Tuesday 

April 16 — Thursday 

May 19— Tuesday 

May 24 — Sunday 

May 26, 27, 28— Tues., Wed., Thurs. 

May 30— Saturday 



SPECIAL DAYS 

November 5 — Tuesday 
November 4-11, inclusive 
January 19-22, inclusive 
February 14 — Friday 
February 16-22, inclusive 
March 17 — Tuesday 



Founder's Day 
American Education Week 
Religious Emphasis Week 
Arbor Day 
Brotherhood Week 
Honors Day 



1964 



JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


1 2 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 



CONTENTS 



Page 

HISTORICAL STATEMENT 5 

COLLEGE CALENDAR 6-7 

COLLEGE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 10 

NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF HIGHER EDUCATION 10 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 10 

ACADEMIC ORGANIZATION OF THE COLLEGE 11 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 12 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 12 

RELATED SERVICES STAFF 21 

GENERAL INFORMATION 27 

Location 29 

Institutional Memberships 29 

The Physical Plant 29 

The Audio-Visual Center 31 

Evening Classes 31 

Summer School 31 

Student Personnel Services 32 

Guidance Services 32 

Health Service 33 

Housing 33 

Food Services 34 

Placement Services 34 

Student Organizations and Activities 34 

Loans, Scholarships, and Prizes 41 

Deportment 44 

Financial Information 45 

GENERAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 49 

Admission Procedures 51 

Admission Requirements 52 

Classification of Students 54 

Student Load and Scholastic Standards 55 

Out-of-State Students 59 

Graduation Under a Particular Catalog 60 



Page 

ACADEMIC OFFERINGS 

The School of Agriculture 61 

General Courses for Agricultural Majors 70 

Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 70 

Department of Agricultural Education 74 

Department of Animal Industry 76 

Department of Biology 81 

Department of Chemistry 89 

Department of Home Economics 96 

Department of Plant Science and Technology Ill 

Department of Short Courses 117 

The School of Education And General Studies 123 

Department of Education and Psychology 127 

Department of English 137 

Department of Foreign Languages 146 

Department of Music 151 

Department of Health and Physical Education 158 

Department of Social Sciences 169 

The School of Engineering 183 

Department of Architectural Engineering 186 

Department of Art 189 

Department of Business 193 

Department of Electrical Engineering 210 

Department of Industrial Education 213 

Department of Mathematics 221 

Department of Mechanical Engineering 226 

Department of Physics . 230 

The School of Nursing 235 

The Graduate School 241 

The Technical Institute 247 

The Reserve Officers' Training Corps 267 

PRIZES AND AWARDS 277 

GRADUATES 283 

ENROLLMENT BY COUNTIES IN "NORTH CAROLINA 302 

ENROLLMENT BY STATES 304 

SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT 305 

INDEX 307 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

THE AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE OF NORTH CAROLINA 

GREENSBORO 

Frazier, Robert H., Chairman Greensboro, North Carolina 

Waddell, E. E., Vice Chairman Albemarle, North Carolina 

fDAVis, Murray B High Point, North Carolina 

Hatch, J. Mack Charlotte, North Carolina 

Holding, Robert J., Jr Smithfield, North Carolina 

Hunt, Joseph M., Jr Greensboro, North Carolina 

Johnston, Frontis W Davidson, North Carolina 

Morehead, David M Greensboro, North Carolina 

Reid, W. L. Kannapolis, North Carolina 

Sockwell, George Elon College, North Carolina 

Stewart, J. S Durham, North Carolina 

Wicker, W. B Sanford, North Carolina 

t Deceased 

NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF HIGHER EDUCATION 

William C. Archie, Director 

Howard R. Boozer, Assistant Director 

Kenneth C. Batchelor, Assistant Director for Finance 

L. P. McLendon, Chairman 

William F. Womble, Vice Chairman 

Mrs. Harry P. Horton 

N. Elton Aydlett John P. Kennedy, Jr. 

Oliver C. Carmichael William J. Kennedy, Jr. 

W. D. Herring Mrs. Harry B. Stein 

NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Edwin Gill, State Treasurer 

Charles F. Carroll, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Secretary 

William D. Herring, Chairman 

J. A. Pritchett, Vice Chairman 

George Douglas Aitken Guy B. Phillips 

R. Barton Hayes John M. Reynolds 

Charles E. Jordan Charles G. Rose, Jr. 

C. W. McCrary H. L. Trigg 

10 



ACADEMIC ORGANIZATION OF THE COLLEGE 

I. THE SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 

The Department of Agricultural Economics 

The Department of Agricultural Education 

The Department of Animal Husbandry 

The Department of Biology 

The Department of Chemistry 

The Department of Home Economics 

The Department of Plant Science and Technology 

The Department of Short Courses 

II. THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND GENERAL STUDIES 

The Department of Education and Psychology 

The Department of English 

The Department of Foreign Languages 

The Department of Music 

The Department of Physical Education 

The Department of Social Sciences 

III. THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

The Department of Architectural Engineering 

The Department of Art 

The Department of Business 

The Department of Electrical Engineering 

The Department of Industrial Education 

The Department of Mathematics 

The Department of Mechanical Engineering 

The Department of Physics 

IV. THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 
V. THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

VI. THE TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 



11 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Warmoth T. Gibbs, A.B., Ed.M., LL.D President-Emeritus 

Samuel D. Pkoctor, B.A., B.D.. Th.D President 

Lewis C. Dowdy, A.B., M.A., Litt.D Dean of Instruction 

Harvey R. Alexander, B.S., M.S. Business Manager 

Robert S. Beale, B.S., M.S.. Ph.D Director, Institutional Research 

Ellis Corbett, B.S Director, Public Information Services 

F. E. Davis, B.S., M.D College Physician 

Charles C. Dean, B.S., B.L.S., M.A Librarian 

William H. Gamble, B.S Director of Admissions 

William Goode, B.S Professor of Military Science 

Vance E. Gray, B.S., M.B.A Administrative Assistant to the President 

Willis Hubert, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Professor of Air Science 

Arthur F. Jackson, B.S., M.A., Ed.D. Director of Guidance 

Walter T. Johnson, B.S., M.S Director of Vocational Agriculture 

R. E. Jones, B.S., M.S State Extension Agent 

Jerald M. Marteena, B.M.E., M.S Dean, School of Engineering 

Cleo McCoy, A.B., B.D Director of Religious Activities 

Glenn F. Rankin, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Dean of Students 

Leonard H. Robinson, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Dean, School of Education and 

General Studies 

George C. Royal, Jr., B.S., M.S., Ph.D Dean, The Graduate School 

S. Joseph Shaw, B.S., M.A Director, Evening Classes; Director, 

Freshman SUidies Program 

Samuel C. Smith, B.S., M.S Dean, The Technical Institute 

A. Knighton Stanley, A.B., B.D Director, United Southern Christian 

Fellowship Foundation 

Calvin R. Stevenson, B.S., M.A Director, The Summer School 

James R. Taylor, B.S., M.S. Supervisor, Trades and Industrial Education 

J. W. Warren, B.S. Director of Vocational Agriculture 

Burleigh C. Webb, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Dean, The School of Agriculture 

Frederick A. Williams, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. Director of Extended Services 

L. A. Wise, B.S.C., M.A Bursar 

Naomi Wynn, R.N., B.S., M.A Dean, The School of Nursiyig 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

PROFESSORS 

Robert S. Beale Chemistry 

B.S., West Virginia State College; M.S., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., Pennsyl- 
vania State University. 

William M. Bell Director of Athletics 

Chairman, Men's Physical Education Department 

B.A., Ohio State University; M.A., Ph.D., Ibid. 

Carolyn Crawford Home Economics 

B.S., Columbia University; M.A., Ibid. 

Clarence E. Dean Chairman, Department of Agricultural Education 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., Iowa State University. 

12 



Officers of Instruction 13 

Lewis C. Dowdy Dean of Instruction, Education and Psychology 

A.B., AUen University; M.A., Indiana State Teachers College; Litt. D., Allen University. 

Samuel J. Dunn Chairman, Department of Plant Science 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., Michigan State University; Ph.D. Oregon State College. 

Cecile H. Edwards Nutrition and Research 

B.S., Tuskegee Institute; M.S., Ibid; Ph.D., Iowa State University. 

Donald A. Edwards Chairman, Department of Physics 

A.B., Talladega College; M.S., University of Chicago; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 

Gerald A. Edwards Chairman, Department of Chemistry 

B.S., North Carolina College; Ph.D., University of Buffalo. 

Clara V. Evans Chairman, Department of Home Economics 

B.S., West Virginia State College; M.A., Columbia University. 

*Charles A. Fountain Plant Science and Technology 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., Michigan State University; Ph.D., Ibid. 

Robert C. Freeman Chemistry 

B.S., North Carolina College; M.S., Ibid., Ph.D., Wayne State University. 

Warmoth T. Gibbs President-Emeritus, Social Sciences 

A.B., Harvard University; Ed.M., Ibid; LL.D., Wiley College. 

William Goode Lt. Col-Military Science 

B.S., Knoxville College. 

Alfonso E. Gore Education and Psychology 

B.S., Bluefield State College; M.A., West Virginia University; C.A.G.S., Boston Uni- 

Artis P. Graves Chairman, Department of Biology 

B.S., Bluefield State College; M.S., University of Iowa; Ph.D., Ibid. 

Charles L. Hayes Chairman, Department of Education and 

Psychology and Director of Teacher Education 

A.B., Leland College; Ed.M., Loyola University; Ed.D., Colorado State College. 

Alfred Hill Entomology 

B.S., Prairie View College; M.A., Colorado A. and M. College; Ph.D., Kansas State 

University 

Willis J. Hubert Major — Air Science 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.A., New York University; Ph.D., Ibid. 

Arthur F. Jackson Director, The Guidance Center, Education 

and Psychology 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.A., Columbia University; Ed.D., Ibid. 

Wadaran L. Kennedy Chair?nan, Department of Animal Industry 

B.S., University of Illinois: M.S., Ibid.; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State College. 

Frenise A. Logan Chairman, Department of Social Sciences 

A.B., Fisk University; M.A., Western Reserve University; Ph.D., Ibid. 

T. Mahaffey Chairman, Department of Business 

B.S., Ohio State University; M.B.A., Ph.D., Ibid. 

Eugene Marrow Biology 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., The Catholic University of America; Ph.D., Ibid. 

Jerald M. Marteena Dean, The School of Engineering, 

Mechanical Engineering 

B.M.E., Ohio State University; M.S., University of Michigan, 
versity; Ed.D., Ibid. 

John C. McLaughlin Rural Sociology 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Cornell University. 

Howard T. Pearsall Chairman, Department of Music 

B.S., Fisk University; M.A., Western Reserve University. 

James Pendergrast Chemistry 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Howard University; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 



* On Leave 



14 The Agricultural and Technical College 

Charles W. Pinckney . . Chairman, Department of Industrial Education 

B.S., South Carolina State College; M.S., University of Illinois; Ed.D., Pennsylvania 
State College. 

Samuel D. Proctor President of the College, Humanities 

A.B., Virginia Union University; B.D., Crozer Theological Seminary; Th.D., Boston 
University. 

Dorothy Prince Education and Psychology 

A.B., Oberlin College; M.A., Syracuse University; Ed.D., Indiana University. 

Glenn F. Rankin Dean of Students, Education 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Pennsylvania State University; Ed.D., Ibid. 

Waverlyn N. Rice Chairman, Department of Foreign Languages 

A.B., Morehouse College; Docteur d'Universite', University of Toulouse. 

Armand Richardson . Chairman, Department of Electrical Engineering 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh; M.S., Ibid. 

Howard F. Robinson . . Chairman, Department of Agricultural Economics 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., University of Illinois; Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Leonard H. Robinson Dean, The School of Education and 

General Studies, Social Sciences 

B.S., Wilberforce University; M.A., Atlanta University; Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

George C. Royal, Jr Dean, The Graduate School, Bacteriology 

B.S., Tuskegee Institute; M.S., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D.. University of Penn- 
sylvania. 

Gladys W. Royal Chemistry 

B.A., Dillard University; M.S., Tuskegee Institute; Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Randa D. Russell, Chairman, Department of Women's Physical Education 

A.B., Kentucky State College; B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., University of Michigan; 
M.P.H., University of Minnesota; Ed.D., University of Michigan. 

Samuel C. Smith Dean, The Technical Institute, Industrial Arts 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., University of Michigan. 

Albert W. Spruill Education and Psychology 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Iowa State University; Ed.D., Cornell University. 

Calvin R. Stevenson Director, The Summer School, Education 

and Psychology 

B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University; M.A., Ibid. 

William A. Streat . Chairman, Department of Architectural Engineering 

B.S., Hampton Institute; B.S., University of Illinois; S.M., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. 

Virgil C. Stroud Acting Chairman, Department of Social Sciences 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., New York University; Ph.D., Ibid. 

Theodore Sykes Chairman, Department of Mathematics 

B.S., Virginia Union University; M.A., Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., Ibid. 

Juanita 0. D. Tate Economics 

A.B., Howard University; M.A., Ibid; Ph.D., New York University. 

Darwin T. Turner Chairman, Department of English 

B.A., University of Cincinnati; M.A., Ibid; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Joseph Warner Visiting Professor of Education and Psychology 

A.B., Northeastern University; M.A., University of California; Ph.D., Ibid. 

Samuel von Winbush Chemistry 

A n Tennessee A. and I. State University; M.S., Iowa State College; Ph.D., University 
of Kansas. 

Alfreda J. Webb Biology 

B.S., Tuskegee Institute; M.S., Michigan State University; D.V.M., Tuskegee Institute. 

Burleigh C. Webb Dean, The School of Agriculture, Plant Science 

and Technology 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., University of Illinois; Ph.D., Michigan State University. 

Frank H. White History 

B.S., Hampton Institute; A.M., New York University; Ph.D., Ibid. 



Officers of Instruction 15 

Frederick A. Williams Agricultural Economics 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., Michigan State University, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Ralph L. Wooden Education and Psychology 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., Ohio State University; Ph.D., Ibid. 

Naomi W. Wynn Dean, The School of Nursing 

R.N., Hampton Institute School of Nursing; B.S., New York University; M.A., Ibid. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

J. Niel Armstrong Education and Psychology 

B.S., A. and T. College; A.M., University of Michigan. 

Arthur P. Bell Agricultural Education 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Pennsylvania State University. 

Mildred J. L. Bonner Medical Nursing 

R.N., Meharry Medical College; B.S., Tennessee A. and I. State University; M.S., Ibid. 

Pearl G. Bradley English 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., University of Michigan 

*Isaiah H. Brown Education and Psychology 

B.S., Howard University; M.A., Columbia University. 

C. R. A. Cunningham Biology 

B.S., University of Illinois; M.S., Ibid. 

Thomas A. Clark History-Geography 

B.S., College of the City of New York; M.S., Ibid.; M.A., Columbia University. 

Ann L. Davis Clothing 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., University of Pennsylvania. 

Maria Diaz Physics 

Doctorate in Physics and Mathematics, University of Havana. 

Octavio Diaz Mathematics 

Doctorate in Mathematics and Physics, University of Havana. 

Sidney H. Evans Economics 

B.S., Virginia State College; M.S., Iowa State University. 

George C. Gail Industrial Arts 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., University of Minnesota. 

Warmoth T. Gibbs, Jr English 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., New York University. 

Ruth M. Gore Educational Counselor, Guidance Center 

B.S., Livingstone College; M.A., West Virginia University. 

Gerard E. Gray Architectural Engineering 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., University of Illinois. 

LeRoy F. Holmes, Jr Chairman, Department of Art 

B.A., Howard University; M.A., Harvard University. 

Mahesh C. Jain Business 

N.D., Com., B.Com. Delhi Polytechnic; L.L.B., Mission College Law School; M.B.A., 
Atlanta University; F.S.A.A. (C.P.A.), Society of Incorporated Accountants and Audi- 
tors of India. 

Elouise McKinney-Johnson English 

A.B., Spelman College; A.M., Boston University. 

Wendell P. Jones Mathematics 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., University of Iowa. 

Joshua W. Kearney Dairy Manufacturing 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Michigan State University. 

Carrye H. Kelley English 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania; M.A., New York University. 



On Leave. 



16 The Agricultural and Technical College 
Hardy Liston, Jr Chairman, Department of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., Howard University. 

Cleo M. McCoy Director of Religious Activities, Humanities 

A.B., Paine College; B.D., Howard University. 

Edmund T. Moore Mathematics 

B.S., Johnson C. Smith Universityy; M.A., Trinity College. 

Bert C. Piggott Football Coach, Physical Education 

B.S., University of Illinois; M.S., Ibid. 

Anita M. Rivers Mathematics 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.A., University of Michigan. 

Julia Spight Public Health Nursing 

R.N., Hampton Institute School of Nursing; B.S., North Carolina College at Durham; 
M.S., Catholic University. 

John M. R. Stevenson English and Dramatics 

A.B., Arkansas A.M. & N. College; A.M., University of Arkansas. 

Arthur S. Totten Poultry 

B.S., West Virginia State College; M.S., Michigan State University. 

Gladys H. White Director, Reading Laboratory 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University. 

William M. White Educational Counselor, Guidance Center 

A.B., University of Kansas; M.A., Ibid. 

Leo Williams, Jr Electrical Engineering 

B.S., University of Illinois; M.S., Ibid. 

Charles R. Wyrick English 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., New York University. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Donald P. Addison Sociology 

B.S., North Carolina College; M.A., Boston University. 

Melvin T. Alexander Electrical Technology 

B.S., A. and T. College. 

Worth L. Barbour Sociology 

A.B., Shaw University; B.D., Crozer Theological Seminary; In-Service Training, Phila- 
delphia County Board of Public Welfare. 

Charles Blue Music 

B.S., Virginia Union University; M.S.M., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. 

Evans Booker Chemistry 

B.S., Saint Augustine's College; M.S., Tuskegee Institute. 

Thelma E. Bradford Mathematics 

A.B., Tougaloo College; M.A., Atlanta University. 

Talmage Brewer Animal Husbandry 

B.S., Prairie View College; M.S., Michigan State University. 

Jean M. Bright English 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., Columbia University. 

William Campfield, Jr Captain — Air Science 

B.S., Tuskegee Institute. 

Walter F. Carlson Band Music 

B.S., A. and T. College; M. Mus. University of Michigan. 

Ethbert S. Carr Agricultural Engineering 

B.S., Ohio State University. 

Marquis L. Cousins Automotive Technology 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ibid. 

Clarence Cummings, Jr Captain, Military Science 

A.B., South Carolina State College. 



Officers of Instruction 17 

James F. Dawkins Building Construction Technology 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., University of Pennsylvania. 

Katie G. Dorsett Business Education 

B.S., Alcorn College; M.S., Indiana University. 

Grace Dunlap Medical-Surgical Nursing 

R.N., St. Agnes School of Nursing; B.S., Saint Augustine's College. 

Dorothy M. Eller English 

B.S., Boston University; M.A., Ibid. 

Evelyn L. Gadsden Research Assistant — Foods and Nutrition 

B.S., Virginia State College; M.S., Western Reserve University. 

Joe E. Grier Animal Husbandry 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., University of Illinois. 

Anne C. Graves Education and Psychology 

A.B., Morris Brown College; M.A., University of Chicago. 

Melvin H. Groomes Baseball Coach, Physical Education 

B.S., Indiana University; M.S., A. and T. College. 

David M. Hall Captain — Air Science 

A.B., Howard University. 

Eddie Hargrove . Tailoring 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., A. and T. College. 

Amos W. Harper, Jr. Captain — Air Science 

B.A., Johnson C. Smith University. 

B. W. Harris Director, Short Courses 

B.S., A and T. College; M.S., Pennsylvania State University. 

Thomas Heritage Mechanical Engineering 

B.C.E., North Carolina State College; B.Arch. E., Ibid. 

Herbert M. Heughan Mathematics 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.A., Ibid. 

David M. Hinton Mathematics 

B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College; M.S., DePaul University. 

Geneva J. Holmes Advisor, Foreign Students, History 

A.B., Howard University; M.A., Columbia University. 

Cheng-Chang Hu Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., National Northeastern University. 

Calvin C. Irvin Basketball Coach, Physical Education 

B.S., University of Illinois; M.A., Columbia University. 

Harold L. Lanier Major, Military Science 

Hattye H. Liston Education and Psychology 

B.S., North Carolina College; M.A., New York University; Certificate, Yale University. 

Nan P. Manuel Mathematics 

B.S., Morgan State College; M.S., Howard University. 

Loreno M. Marrow English 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., New York University. 

Harold E. Mazyck, Jr Educational Counselor, Guidance Center 

B.S., Talladega College, M.A., New York University. 

James McCoy Art 

B.S., North Carolina College; M.A., Columbia University. 

Helen McCullough Medical-Surgical Nursing 

R.N., St. Agnes School of Nursing; B.S., Saint Augustine's College. 

W. I. Morris Placement Officer 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., New York University. 

Murray L. Neely Track Coach, Physical Education 

B.S., Florida A. and M. University; M.A., Ohio State University. 



18 The Agricultural and Technical College 
Katrina Porcher Home Economics 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.A., Columbia University. 

Marguerite E. Porter English 

A.B., Allen University; M.A., Atlanta University. 

Barbara M. Reid Obstetric Nursing 

R.N., Meharry Medical College; B.S., Ibid.; B.A., Knoxville College. 

Catherine H. Robinson English 

A.B., Shaw University; M.S., A. and T. College 

*William Robinson English 

B.A., New York University; M.A., Boston University. 

*Gordon T. Saddler History 

A.B., West Virginia State; M.A., West Virginia University. 

Shirley Sharpe Medical-Surgical Nursing 

R.N., St. Agnes School of Nursing; B.S., Saint Augustine's College. 

S. Joseph Shaw Education 

B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College; M.A., North Carolina College. 

Florentine V. Sowell Business 

B.S., University of Omaha; M.B.A., University of Chicago. 

Veda S. Stroud Business 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., Columbia University. 

Morrell Thompson Plant Industry 

B.S., University of Wisconsin; M.S., Ibid. 

Robert L. Turman Major, Military Science 

B.S., Tuskegee Institute; M.S., A. and T. College. 

T. S. Wadhwa Electrical Engineering 

B.E.E., University of Delhi. 

Carrie Walden Medical-Surgical Nursing 

R.N., St. Agnes School of Nursing; B.S., Saint Augustine's College. 

Leonard White Art 

A.B., University of North Carolina; M.A., Ibid. 

Andrew W. Williams Mechanical Technology 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ibid. 

Forrest H. Willis Physical Education 

B.S., Johnson C. Smith University; M.A., New York University. 

Walter G. Wright Chemistry 

B.S., North Carolina College; M.S., Ibid. 

INSTRUCTORS 

Thomas H. Avery Electrical Technology 

Certificate, Southeastern Signal Institute; B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., A. and T. 
College. 

Zoe R. Barbee English 

A.B., Smith College; M.A., New York University. 

Elihue Barden Mechanical Drawing 

B.S., A. and T. College; Certificate, Institute of Physics. 

Isaac Barnett Driver Education 

B.S., A. and T. College. 

Robert P. Belle Business 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ibid. 

E. Bernardine Booker Music 

B.A., Fisk University; M.Ed. University of North Carolina. 

Lovie K. Booker Chemistry 

B.S., Arkansas A. M. and N. College; M.S., Tuskegee Institute. 
* On Leave. 



Officers of Instruction 19 

Nathan Brown Building Construction Technology 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ibid. 

Noah Brown Biology 

B.S., North Carolina College at Durham; M.S., Ibid. 

Gwendolyn H. Cherry Stat., Mathematics 

B.S., A. and T. College. 

Elizabeth P. Clark Biology 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ibid. 

Anna J. Coble Physics 

B.S., Howard University; M.S., Ibid. 

Ernestine Compton Physical Education 

B.S., Central State College; M.A., Temple University. 

Portia Crawford English 

B.A., Atlanta University; B.Mus., Syracuse University. 

Catherine A. DeBose Medical-Surgical Nursing 

R.N., A. and T. College; B.S., Ibid. 

Clyde DeHuguley Leathercraft 

Graduate, Tuskegee Institute. 

Rubye T. Davis Business 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.Ed., Woman's College, University of North Carolina 

Margaret E. Falkener English 

A.B., Talladega College; M.S., A. and T. College. 

Sampson W. Foster, Jr Mechanical Technology 

Certificate, U. S. Army Training School. 

'Tiney Garrison Medical-Surgical Nursing 

R.N., Good Samaritan School of Nursing. 

J. W. R. Grandy Horticulture 

B.S., A. and T. College. 

Leon H. Hardy Electrical Technology 

B.S., A. and T. College. 

Willie C. High Mathematics 

B.S., North Carolina College; M.S., A. and T. College. 

Major B. Hollow ay Automotive Technology 

Certificate, A. and T. College; Certificate, General Motors Institute and Carter Car- 
buretors. 

Pauline Hollow ay English 

A.B., Allen University; M.A., University of Pittsburgh. 

Willie L. Hunter Electrical Technology 

B.S., Virginia State College; Certificate, Hampton Institute; M.S., A. and T. College. 

James L. Jenkins Drafting Technology 

B.S., Hampton Institute. 

Junia A. Jenkins Public Health Nursing 

R.N., Hampton Training School for Nurses; B.S., North Carolina College. 

Lucille Jewell English 

A.B., Butler University; M.S., Ibid. 

Gertrude A. Johnson English 

A.B., Shaw University; M.S., A. and T. College. 

Lois Kinney English 

A.B., Wilberforce University; A.M., Ohio State University. 

Paul E. Leacraft Physics 

B.S., A. and T. College. 

Mansel P. McCleave Horticulture 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ibid. 



* On Leave. 



20 The Agricultural and Technical College 
Cardoza McCollum Mathematics 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ibid. 

William H. Mitchell Biology 

B.S., West Virginia State College; M.A., Purdue University. 

John H. Morris Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., A. and T. College. 

Sandra B. M. Motz English and Dramatics 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., New York University. 

Forrest J. Parks Building Construction Technology 

B.S., Hampton Institute. 

Lewis Richards Building Construction Technology 

B.S., Hampton Institute. 

Nathan Sanders Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ibid. 

Myrtle L. Smith Home Economics 

B.S., North Carolina College; M.S., Ohio State University. 

A. Knighton Stanley Director of United Southern Christian 

Fellowship Foundation 

A.B., Talladega College; B.D., Yale University. 

Isaiah Trice Physical Education 

B.S., University of Illinois; M.S., University of Colorado. 

Patricia J. Trice Music 

B.A., Oberlin College; M.A., University of Illinois. 

Margaret C. Warren Medical-Surgical Nursing 

R.N., The A. and T. College; B.S., Ibid. 

Katye Watson Director, Nursery School 

B.S., A. and T. College; Certificate, Eliot-Pearson Nursery School; M.Ed., Tufts Uni- 
versity. 

Annette Williams Foreign Languages 

A.B., Howard University; M.A., Ibid. 

Annie L. Williams Physical Education 

B.S., Florida A. and M. University. 

Cleophas Williams Education and Psychology 

■ B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., Michigan State University. 

Ellen Williams Foreign Languages 

B.S., University of Illinois; M.A., Ibid. 

Iris Williams Foreign Languages 

A.B., North Carolina College; M.A., Atlanta University. 

* James Williams Biology 

A.B., Talladega College; M.S., Atlanta University. 

Jimmie J. Williams Music 

B.S., Florida A. and M. University; M.A., University of Illinois. 

Raymond P. Williams Mechanical Technology 

Certificate, American Bureau of Shipping Surveyors. 

Lee A. Yates Agricultural Engineering 

B.S., A. and T. College. 



* Away on Leave. 



Related Service Staff 21 

RELATED SERVICES STAFF 

Ruth W. Addison, B.S. Stenographer, Chemistry Department 

Sabina Alexander, B.S Library Assistant 

Monnie Allen, B.S Stenographer, College Bookstore 

Jacquetta Armstrong, A. A Library Assistant 

Patsy Arvin Switchboard Operator 

Catherine D. Banks, B.S Secretary, College Guidance Center 

Sadie A. Bennett Typist, Cafeteria 

Claytee M. Blackwell Food Service Supervisor 

Catherine T. Bonner Secretary to Director of Physical Education 

George W. Bonner, B.S Dormitory Supervisor 

Philip D. Boone, B.S., M.S Assistant Dean of Men 

Gloria M. Boyd, B.S. . .Secretary to Dean, Sch. of Educ. and Gen. Studies 

Nina Bridges Secretary to Dean, Graduate School 

James F. Bright Manager Commissary 

Mavis K. Brimage, B.S Assistant Dean of Women 

Virginia W. Brown, B.S Typist, Office of Admissions 

Lillian Bryant Stenographer, School of Engineering 

Geneva C. Bullock, B.S Clerk, Office of Admissions 

Anna Bynum, A.B. Dormitory Supervisor 

Julia B. Caldwell Secretary to Supervisor of Voc. Agri. 

Jacqueline Camack, B.S Typist, Business Departmnt 

Beulah Campbell, R.N General Duty Nurse 

Doris D. Canada, B.S Personnel Assistant, 

Office of the Administrative Assistant to the President 

Ernest R. Canada, B.S. . . Janitor Supervisor, Buildings & Grounds Dept. 

Mabel Cole, B.S Stenographer, Bursar's Office 

William Cooley, B.A., M.L.S. Librarian 

Katie L. Cozart, B.S Stenographer, Director of Short Courses 

Albert Crawford, B.S Laundry Manager 

Bynum Crews, A.B., M.L.S Librarian 

Thelma Culbreth, B.A Dormitory Supervisor 

Cecelia Cunningham, B.S Typist, Registrar's Office 

Estell Cubley, B.S Library Assistant 

Louise C. Davis, B.S Secretary to Director of Information Services 

Maxine D. Davis, B.S. Secretary to the Business Manager 



22 The Agricultural and Technical College 

Prentiss L. Davis Clerk, Bookstore 

Virginia Dawkins, B.S Library Assistant 

Frances Debnam, B.S Secretary to Dean, School of Engineering 

Clyde DeHuguley Property Custodian 

Ruth Dillard, B.S. Secretary, Agriculture Education Dept. 

Doris Downing, B.S Stenographer, Education Department 

Virginia Durham, B.S Secretary to the President 

Bernice M. Edwards Accounting Clerk, Business Manager's Office 

Margaret L. Evans, B.S Accounting Clerk, Office of the 

Administrative Assistant to the President 

Annie G. Foster, B.S Secretary to the Director of Admissions 

Donnie J. Freeman, A.B., M.L.S Librarian 

Wilton Freeman Janitor Supervisor, Buildings and Grounds Dept. 

Martha Gardner, B.S Secretary to the Dean, School of Nursing 

James E. Garfield, B.S., M.S Manager, Bookstore 

Carmen Goins Food Service Supervisor 

Allison Gordon, B.S College Postman 

Marvin B. Graeber, B.S., M.S. . .Superintendent, Build, and Grounds Dept. 

Josephine Gray, B.A Clerk, College Guidance Center 

John Griffin Police Chief 

Marilyn Y. Griffin, B.S Dormitory Supervisor 

Mary L. Hampton, B.S Food Service Supervisor 

Carrie W. Harper, B.S Accounting Clerk, Bursar's Office 

James Harrell, B.S Dormitory Supervisor 

Julia C. Harris, B.S Stenographer, Home Economics Department 

Arthur Headen, B.S Dormitory Supervisor 

Mary G. Hardy, R.N General Duty Nurse 

LaJoie M. Howard, B.S Typist, Office of Admissions 

Hornsby Howell, B.S Gymnasium Director and Athletic Trainer 

Mary J. Howell Library Assistant 

Elizabeth S. Hudgens, B.S Library Assistant 

Mildred L. Hunter, B.S Nursery School Assistant 

Kathryn W. Irvin, B.S Stenographer, Biology Department 

Gladys Jeffries, B.S Typist, Registrar's Office 

DeOla W. Johnson Accounting Clerk, Business Manager's Office 

Harvey A. Johnson, B.S., M.S Superintendent of Farm 



Related Service Staff 23 

Loretta L. Johnson, B.S. . .Stenographer, School of Educ. and Gen. Science 

Dorothy G. Jones, B.S Stenographer, Army ROTC 

Gladys D. Jones, B.S Secretary, Sebastian Infirmary 

Ruby W. Jones, B.S Accounting Clerk, Business Manager's Office 

Ethel Keith Key Punch Operator, College Guidance Center 

Ernestine Kinsey, B.S Secretary to the Dean of Men 

Phyoncia H. Lee, B.S Food Service Supervisor 

Dorothy Lightford, B.S Stenographer, Bluford Library 

Barbara G. Little Typist, Business Manager's Office 

Marion T. Logan, B.S Stenographer, School of Nursing 

Mary K. Marks Dormitory Supervisor 

M. Catherine Matier, B.S Library Assistant 

Joan B. Martin, B.S Secretary to Director of Summer School 

Ernest A. McCoy, B.S. Dormitory Supervisor 

Mabel McCoy, A.B., A.M., B.L.S Librarian 

Pauline G. McLaughlin, B.S Accounting Clerk, Office of the 

Administrative Assistant to the President 

Charles McLean Stock Room Clerk 

Margie T. Moore Food Service Supervisor 

Alma I. Morrow, A.B., B.S., ML.S Librarian 

Madeline H. Nash Clerk, Library 

Mae H. Nash, B.S Secretary to the Dean, School of Agriculture 

Joyce G. Neal, B.S Secretary to Supervisor of Trade and 

Industrial Education 

Mary G. Neal, R.N General Duty Nurse 

T. E. Neal, B.S Superintendent, Power Plant 

Myrtle L. Nesbitt, B.S Dormitory Supervisor 

Zadie Norris, R.N General Duty Nurse 

Madie Oliver, B.S Accounting Clerk, Bursar's Office 

Thelma Pearsall, B.S., B.L.S., M.L.S Librarian 

Evangeline B. Pendergrast, B.S Typist, Office of Admissions 

Norma Pennix, B.S Secretary to Air Force ROTC 

Daphine H. Peoples, B.S Stenographer, Buildings and Grounds Dept. 

Sadie Phillips, B.S Clerk, Library 

Lucille Piggott, B.S Secretary to the Dean of Instruction 

Correne A. Poole, B.S Secretary to the Librarian 



24 The Agricultural and Technical College 

Isaiah H. Prince, B.S Cashier, Bursar's Office 

Blondell L. Reid, B.A Secretary to the Dean of Students 

Tiyette N. Rogers, B.S Accounting Clerk, Business Manager's Office 

Bessie Sampson, B.S. Typist, English Department 

Edgar Shephard, B.S. Assistant Property Custodian 

Elsie Simmons Secretary to the Dean of Women 

Annie R. Simpson, B.S Dormitory Supervisor 

Ella M. Small, B.S Assistant Director, Nursery School 

Bertha H. Smith, B.S Secretary to the Dean, Technical Institute 

Florine I. Stafford, B.S Library Assistant 

Anne G. Swygert, B.S Key Punch Operator, College Guidance Center 

Evelyn A. Taylor Typist, Buildings and Grounds Department 

Allie L. Thompson, B.S Secretary to the Director of Placement 

Mary L. Thompson, B.S Library Assistant 

Eula K. Vereen, B.S Dietitian 

Thelma Vines, B.S., R.N., M.T. . .Supervisory Nurse, Sebastian Infirmary 

Ethel R. Wallace, B.S Stenographer, Vocational Agriculture 

Latham Wallace, B.S Assistant Property Custodian 

Ida Pearl White, B.A Typist, Office of Admissions 

Ethel Whitsett Typist, Office of Admissions 

Erma T. Williams Dormitory Supervisor 

Robert A. Williams, B.S Assistant Property Custodian 

Madessa L. Willoughby, B.S Dormitory Supervisor 

Zollie Wilson Assistant Farm Supervisor 

Tommy W. Woodard, B.S Chemist 

Rosalie M. Wooden Secretary to Director of Evening Classes and 

Freshman Studies 

Alene C. Young, A.B., M.L.S Librarian 

Katy S. Zachary, B.S Library Assistant 

NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS OF THE 
UNITED STATES ARMY ADMINISTRATION 

Jimmie Cuby, Sergeant First Class Heavy Weapons Instructor 

Henry L. Davis, Sergeant First Class Supply NCO 

Harold L. Jordan, Sergeant First Class Light Weapons Instructor 

Joseph W. Sharpe, Master Sergeant Administrative NCO 



Related Service Staff 25 

NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS OF THE 
UNITED STATES AIR FORCE ADMINISTRATION 

Obie Calton, Airman First Class Administrative Specialist 

Frederick N. Smith, Technical Sergeant Personnel Technician 

Administrative Supervisor 

Jesse L. Suggs, Staff Sergeant Administrative Specialist 

James J. Ware, Jr., Master Sergeant Supply Supervisor 

STATE AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE PERSONNEL 

R. E. Jones State Extension Agent 

Minnie M. Brown Assistant State Home Economics Agent 

L. R. Johnson District Agricultural Agent 

John A. Spaulding District Agricultural Agent 

Harold M. McNeill District Agricultural Agent 

Helen W. Branford District Home Economics Agent 

Josephine S. Weaver District Home Economics Agent 

Frances W. Corbett District Home Economics Agent 

Genevieve K. Greenlee Home Economics Specialist 

Bessie B. Ramseur Home Economics Specialist 

W. C. Cooper District U-H Club Leader 

Gwendolyn H. Blount District U-H Club Leader 

P. P. Thompson Extension Poultry Specialist 

T. W. Flowers Extension Horticulture Specialist 

Samuel J. Hodges Agronomy Extension Specialist 

*R. L. Wynn Extension Dairy Specialist 

Annabelle K. Gamble Secretary, District Home Economics Agents 

Rubye F. Garfield Secretary, District U-H Club Leaders and 

Extension Poultry Specialist 

Mildred H. Parker Secretary, State Extension Agent 

Roberta M. Bruton Secretary, Men Specialists 

Doris H. Harshaw Secretary, District Agricultural Agents 

Mary F. Walker Secretary, Assistant State Home Economics 

Agent and Home Economics Specialists 

* On Leave 



f/'-" - : 



GENERAL INFORMATION 




Location 

Institutional Memberships 

The Physical Plant 

The Audio-Visual Center 

Evening Classes 

Summer School 

Student Personnel Services 

Guidance Services 

Health Services 

Housing 

Food Services 

Placement Services 

Student Organizations and Activities 

Loans, Scholarships, and Prizes 

Deportment 

Financial Information 

Refunding Schedule 



General Information 29 

LOCATION 

The College is located only nine blocks from the center of Mid-town 
Greensboro — a city of 129,000 — noted for its friendliness and hospitality. 
This excellent urban location of the College has many distinct advantages 
since business establishments, transportation depots, theaters, and churches 
are all within reasonable walking distance. It is a further advantage to 
students who seek part-time employment in the business district of the city. 

Greensboro offers may cultural and educational advantages because of 
the six senior colleges which are located there. The student attending 
A. and T. College may take advantage of the scholarly programs presented 
by these six colleges. 



INSTITUTIONAL MEMBERSHIPS 

The Agricultural and Technical College is a fully accredited member 
of the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, and holds 
institutional membership in the following associations: 

American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education 

American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admission Officers 

American Association of Land-Grant Colleges and State Universities 

American College Public Relations Association 

American Council on Education 

American Public Welfare Association 

Association of American Colleges 

Association of Collegiate Deans and Registrars 

Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture 

College Language Association 

Council of Member Agencies, Department of Baccalaureate and Higher 

Degree Programs (Nursing) 
Nat ; onal Association of Business Teacher Education 
National Association of College and University Food Service 
National Commission on Accrediting 
Nat ; onal Institutional Teacher Placement Association 
National League for Nursing 
North Carolina College Conference 
North Carolina League for Nursing 



THE PHYSICAL PLANT 

The A. and T. College campus comprises modern, fire resistant buildings, 
all thoroughly maintained for the highest level of efficiency, located on 
land holdings in excess of 700-acres. 

Additional facilities to be procured during the current academic year 
include: The Lutheran College Property which contains several buildings; 
two tracts of land on Dudley Street, being purchased from the Redevelop- 
ment Commission of Greensboro, and the new Hines Hall Annex, a half 
million dollar structure, to be constructed this year to expand instruction 
in chemistry. 



30 The Agricultural and Technical College 

BUILDINGS 

Dudley Memorial Building (Administration) 

F. D. Bluford Library 

Harrison Auditorium 

Charles Moore Gymnasium 

Coltrane Hall (Headquarters for N. C. Agricultural Extension Service) 

INSTRUCTION 

Carver Hall School of Agriculture 

Cherry Hall School of Engineering 

Hodgin Hall School of Education and General Studies 

Noble Hall School of Nursing 

Price Hall Technical Institute 

Benbow Hall Home Economics 

Garrett House Home Economics 

Nursery School Home Economics 

Hines Hall Chemistry 

Sockwell Hall Agricultural Engineering 

Ward Hall Dairying 

Reid Greenhouses 

Graham Hall Business 

Frazier Hall Music- Art 

Price Hall Annex Technical Institute 

Campbell Hall ROTC Headquarters 

RESIDENCE HALLS 
For Women 

Holland Hall (150) Residence for Nurses 

Morrison Hall (130) For Men 

Vanstory Hall (92) gcott H&u {im) 

Curtis Hall (148) Cooper M (400) 
Gibbs Hall (200) 



Service Buildings 

Murphy Hall Cafeteria 

Brown Hall Cafeteria, Post Office, bookstore, and snack-bar 

Sebastian Infirmary 

Power Plant 

Laundry-Dry Cleaning Plant 

Miscellaneous Facilities 

College Farms — containing modern farm buildings and stocked lakes. 
Athletic field — including three practice fields for football, quarter mile 
track, baseball diamond and field house. 

The Oaks President's residence 



General Information 31 

THE AUDIO-VISUAL CENTER 

The Audio-Visual Center is a resource pool of materials, services and 
facilities. It purports to assist in the improvement of instruction by pro- 
viding means of facilitating the communication of ideas, attitudes, and 
facts in the teaching-learning process. The Center is located on the first 
floor of Bluford Library. It includes an office area, film inspection area, 
storage area, browsing area, preview room, and a room for group showings. 
The Audio-Visual Center provides the following services for the campus: 

Circulation of audio-visual materials 

Procurement of free loan 16mm films from outside sources 

Information on rental films from other sources 

Projectionists for audio-visual showings 

Projection room with equipment 

Previewing facilities 

Assistance in the selection and preparation of materials 

Production of tape recordings, charts, and graphs 

THE EVENING CLASSES 

The Evening Classes is a program which has been developed at the col- 
lege for the convenience of those persons interested in pursuing a college 
degree on a part-time basis or for those who wish to take courses for per- 
sonal improvement, but for one reason or another are unable to attend col- 
lege on full time. 

Admission requirements are identical to those for regular day classes. 

Credits earned may be applied at full value toward the bachelor of sci- 
ence degree. 

Expenses include: Registration and initial fees, $25.00 per quarter; tui- 
tion for college credit courses, $5.00 per quarter hour and book rental, 
$4.00 per quarter. 

For further information, please write or contact: Director of Evening 
Classes, A. & T. College, Greensboro, North Carolina. 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

The Summer Sessions of the A. and T. College Summer School will be 
held for six weeks, beginning the second week in June. A second session 
will begin in July and continue for four weeks. A ten-week session con- 
current with these two enables undergraduate students to complete a 
quarter of study. 

Aside from the splendid opportunity which the Summer School offers 
teachers-in-service to raise their certificates and thereby obtain better 
salaries, the College makes it possible for the ambitious teacher to obtain 
a standard degree by attending the summer school. 

College students may shorten their stay in college by attending summer 
school. Students from other institutions may enter the summer session for 
credit in their respective institutions, by permission from either the presi- 
dent or dean of their respective colleges. Such students will not be re- 
quired to present a complete record of their previous training, but will be 



32 The Agricultural and Technical College 

required to present a signed statement from the president or dean indi- 
cating the summer courses for which credit will be allowed. 

College graduates may use their time in summer school meeting require- 
ments for the Master of Science degree. Persons interested in earning this 
degree should make application for candidacy early in order that their pro- 
gram may be arranged with this end in view. 

Inquiries should be addressed to: Director of Summer School, A. & T. 
College, Greensboro, North Carolina. 

STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES 

The broad objective of the program of Student Personnel Services is 
to aid the student in developing the attitudes, understandings, insights 
and the skills which will enable him to express himself as a socially com- 
petent person. The program places special emphasis on campus relation- 
ships and experiences which complement formal instruction. 

More specifically the aims of the program of Student Personnel Services 
are as follows: 

1. To help the student to become better acquainted with himself and 
the various problems confronting him. 

2. To help the student to develop the ability to make satisfactory 
choices and solve problems as they arise. 

3. To aid the student in making desirable adjustments in group rela- 
tionships. 

4. To provide cultural and social experiences which will help the student 
to develop an appreciation for the best in our culture. 

5. To promote the physical, mental, moral and spiritual development 
of the student. 

A number of college officials, faculty and staff members are responsible 
for various phases of the program of Student Personnel Services. These 
include the Dean of Students, the Dean of Men, the Dean of Women, the 
Director of Guidance Services, the Director of Student Health Services, 
the Director of Food Services, the Director of Religious Activities, the Di- 
rector of Placement, the Advisor to Foreign Students, faculty advisors, 
and other individuals and agencies. 

GUIDANCE SERVICES 

Provision is made for testing, counseling, and guiding all students 
through the College Guidance Center. It is located on the ground floor of 
Dudley Building. 

The Center is staffed with trained counselors who are prepared to deal 
with educational and vocational problems, problems of social adjustment 
and minor personal problems of the student. The staff is trained in both 
group and individual testing covering the areas of intelligence, aptitude, 
personality, interest, and achievement. 

The Guidance Center conducts a testing program for all freshmen. The 
results of this program are used to assist freshmen in the planning of 
their educational and vocational careers. The Center conducts other test- 



General Information 33 

ing programs as are required or desired by departments of the college, 
also. In addition to these duties, the Center cooperates with the Director 
of Placement in the placement of graduates. 

HEALTH SERVICES 

The college maintains a Health Service for students. The purposes of 
the health program are to safeguard the health of the students, to promote 
health habits among them, and to protect and improve the health environ- 
ment of the college community. 

The Health Service Center carries a staff of doctors, dentists, and nurses 
who are qualified to give professional attention to the health problems of 
students. The basic components of the health service program are as 
follows: 

1. Medical Services: 

The College Physician, who is the Medical Director of the Health 
Services, is in attendance in the infirmary daily — morning and eve- 
ning — and is "on call" for any emergency situations. 

2. Dental Services: 

A dentist is in attendance weekly — Tuesday mornings and Thursday 
afternoons. 

3. Nursing Services: 

Registered nurses, under the direction of a head nurse, are in at- 
tendance daily on a twenty-four hour basis. 

4. Follow-up and Consultation Services: 

Follow-up services are given, and referrals to specialists are made 
upon recommendation of the College Physician. 

5. Physical Examinations: 

a. Athletes, nursing students, advanced ROTC cadets and other spe- 
cial groups of students are given complete physical examinations 
at the Student Health Center each quarter or whenever necessary. 

b. All freshmen and transfer students are required to secure a com- 
plete physical examination, a blood test and a chest X-ray and 
send the examination reports to the College Physician before 
they are admitted to the college. The blood test and chest X-ray 
reports must be secured within 60 days prior to the date of en- 
rollment. Follow-up examinations are made at the Health Center 
when necessary. 

c. All upperclassmen are required to get a physical examination 
from a doctor prior to the beginning of the quarter in which they 
plan to enroll and send the examination report to the College 
Physician. A blood test and X-ray report are not required. 

HOUSING 

The residence halls provide opportunities for personal, social, and in- 
tellectual companionship as well as experiences in group living. Each 



34 The Agricultural and Technical College 

dormitory is organized and it conducts programs for the development of 
the student. 

Housing facilities for women are provided in Curtis, Gibbs, Holland, 
Morrison, and Vanstory Halls. Men are housed in Cooper and Scott Halls. 

Rooms are furnished with twin beds, dressers, study tables, and straight 
chairs. Each student who has been approved for living in one of the resi- 
dence halls should bring his blankets and bed linen or come prepared to 
rent it. 

All students, except those who are residents of Greensboro or those who 
commute from nearby communities, are required to live in one of the 
dormitories unless given permission to live elsewhere by the Dean of 
Students. 

FOOD SERVICES 

The college provides food service for students at a reasonable cost. Two 
well equipped cafeterias and a snack bar are operated at convenient loca- 
tions on the campus. Murphy Hall, located on the main campus, is re- 
served for freshmen and sophomores. The New Cafeteria, located in Brown 
Hall on the corner of Laurel and Lindsay Streets, is open to juniors and 
seniors. The snack bar in Brown Hall serves all students. 

Students who live in the residence halls are required to eat in the cafe- 
terias. Students who live in the city may purchase meals also. 



PLACEMENT SERVICES 

The Placement Office helps special students, seniors and alumni to se- 
cure positions for which they are qualified. It provides counseling and 
follow-up services and arranges interviews between prospective employees 
and employers. 

Graduating seniors and graduate students are required to register with 
the Placement Office which is located in Room 104, Dudley Building. The 
services of this office are free to students and alumni of the college. 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND ACTIVITIES 

The college provides a well-balanced program of activities for moral, 
spiritual, cultural and physical development of the students. Religious, 
cultural, social and recreational activities are sponsored by various com- 
mittees, departments, and organizations of the college. Outstanding artists, 
lecturers and dramatic productions are brought to the campus also. 

Student Government 

The Student Government, the key student organization, shares with 
the administration in planning and regulating student affairs. It recom- 
mends student representatives to serve on college committees, stimulates 
student participation in campus life and helps to make decisions which 
affect the welfare of the students and the college community. 



General Information 35 

Student Publications 

The REGISTER, a weekly publication of the student body, endeavors 
to keep students informed concerning the activities of college and it pro- 
vides an opportunity for the expression of student ideas and opinions. 

The AYANTEE is the College Yearbook. 

The Athletic Program 

Varsity Athletics — The intercollegiate athletic program is under the 
supervision and direction of the Athletic Director and the Athletic Com- 
mittee. The committee includes faculty, alumni and students. The sports 
included in the program are football, basketball, baseball, track and swim- 
ming. The college is a member of the Central Intercollegiate Athletic 
Association, the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, and the 
National Collegiate Athletic Association. 

The varsity letter is awarded to members of the football, baseball, bas- 
ketball, track and swimming teams for outstanding performance and 
active participation. 

The Lettermen's Club — The purpose of the Lettermen's Club is to bring 
about a union between college athletes and to promote the ideals of leader- 
ship, sportsmanship, and fair play. Membership in the organization is 
limited to varsity lettermen of The Agricultural and Technical College. 

Intramural Athletics — A Program of intramural athletic activities is con- 
ducted throughout the school year. Schedules and tournaments are ar- 
ranged, and equipment is made available by league managers and physical 
education majors. All students are encouraged to participate in intramural 
activities. 

The Women's Athletic Association — The Women's Athletic Association is 
a member organization of the Women's Sports Day Association. It is open 
to all women students who desire to participate in competitive and leisure 
time athletic activities, such as hockey, soccer, softball, basketball, volley 
ball, badminton, and archery. Members of the association are selected to 
engage in competitive activity and fellowship with women students of 
other colleges during semi-annual Sports Day meetings. Appropriate 
awards are given for outstanding performance and active participation. 

Religious Organizations and Activities 

The college is a non-denominational state supported institution, but 
opportunities are provided for students to recognize the resources of re- 
ligion and to develop a desirable philosophy of life. The religious organiza- 
tions and activities of the college include the Chapel, Sunday School, 
YMCA, YWCA, Baptist Student Union, Methodist Student Movement, Can- 
terbury Club, Newman Club, Westminster Fellowship, and the Southern 
Christian Fellowship. 



36 The Agricultural and Technical College 

HONOR SOCIETIES 

Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society 

The Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society is a national scholarship organiza- 
tion with local chapters established in accredited colleges. The local chap- 
ter is known as Gamma Tau Chapter of the Alpha Kappa Mu Honor So- 
ciety. The qualifications for Gamma Tau are the same as those of the na- 
tional organization. They are as follows: 

1. Candidates must have completed ninety quarter hours, with an aver- 
age of not less than 3.30. These must include all required courses 
listed for freshmen and sophomores. 

2. Membership is open to all students of the College, provided that they 
meet scholastic requirements; in the case of transfer students, there 
must have been a chapter of Alpha Kappa Mu or some other honor 
society with equivalent standards, rules and regulations at the insti- 
tution from which they transferred. 

3. Candidates must have a clear record in deportment. 

The Society encourages participation in at least one extra-curricular 
activity. All students recommended by the Registrar and the Dean of Stu- 
dents as having the qualifications listed above are eligible for membership. 

The Sophist Society is composed of regular college students of freshmen, 
sophomore, and junior classification who maintain a minimum average of 
3.30. The purpose of this organization is to encourage high scholarship 
among these students. Members who qualify for membership in the Sophist 
Society may join Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society during their junior or 
senior year. 

Sigma Rho Sigma Recognition Society 

Sigma Rho Sigma Recognition Society is a national honor society for 
social science majors. Its membership is open to graduates and under- 
graduates. Chapters of the Society are located in the various colleges 
represented in the membership of the Association of Social Science Teach- 
ers in Negro Colleges. The purposes of the Society are the following: 

1. To encourage study, promote research, and to recognize achievement 
in the field of social science. 

2. To promote the cooperation of students in the field of human relations. 

3. To promote professional growth and development among the members. 

To be eligible, one must be a junior concentrating in the social sciences, 
must have an average of 3.00, and must have a minimum credit of twenty- 
five hours in the social sciences. 

Beta Kappa Chi 

The purpose of this society shall be to encourage and advance scientific 
education through the following: (a) original investigation, (b) the dis- 
semination of scientific knowledge, and (c) the stimulation of high scholar- 
ship in pure and applied science. 



General Information 37 

Kappa Pi 

Kappa Pi, National Honorary Art Fraternity was installed at the col- 
lege in 1962. Membership is opened to art majors of high scholastic stand- 
ing. Its purposes are: 

To promote art interest among college students. 

To bring art departments of various schools closer together. 

To stimulate higher scholarship. 

To recognize potential professional ability. 

Kappa Delta Pi 

Kappa Delta Pi is an honor society in education which admits both men 
and women to membership. The Society is international and is composed 
of laureate, honorary, institutional, and alumni chapters. Membership is 
open to undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty members. 
Undergraduates must be of junior classification. They are required to have 
an average above the upper quartile of the institution and at least nine 
quarter hours of course work in education. Candidates must possess de- 
sirable personal habits and leadership attributes. Membership is by initia- 
tion only. 

Pi Delta Phi, National French Honor Society 

The Pi Delta Pi Honor Society is open to all French majors and minors. 
Its purpose is to stimulate greater interest in French language and cul- 
ture. The Society elects those students who have displayed a keen interest 
in the language and culture and have demonstrated their admiration for 
French. 

Candidates must have completed twenty or more hours of French, in- 
cluding phonetics. They must have a cumulative average of 2.50 and an 
average of 3.00 in all French courses. 

The local chapter is known as Beta Lambda, and is affiliated nationally. 

Pi Omega Pi, National Business Education Fraternity 

The local chapter of Pi Ornega Pi is known as Gamma Phi and is open 
to students who have entered upon a teacher-training program in either 
typing and shorthand and in general business and bookkeeping. They 
must have reached the third quarter of the sophomore year with twenty- 
four quarter hours in business and in education subjects, with a superior 
rating (3.00); and they must have at least a medium rating (2.50) in all 
other subjects. The purpose of Pi Omega Pi are stated below: 

1. To create, encourage, promote, and extend interest in scholarship. 

2. To aid in activities for civic betterment in schools. 

3. To encourage and foster high ethical standards in business and pro- 
fessional life. 

4. To teach the ideal of service as the basis of all worthy enterprise. 

Kappa Epsilon Society 

The Kappa Epsilon Society is an organization whose purpose is to 
stimulate interest in home economics, encourage high attainment in scholar- 



38 The Agricultural and Technical College 

ship, promote satisfying family relationships, and provide opportunities 
for awareness of current trends in home economics. 

Membership is open to students majoring in home economics who main- 
tain a scholastic average of 2.0. Entering freshmen are accepted in the 
society on a two-quarter probationary basis. 

Fraternities and Sororities 

The following national fraternities have chapters at the College: 

Alpha Phi Alpha 
Kappa Alpha Psi 
Phi Beta Sigma 
Omega Psi Phi 
Alpha Phi Omega 

The following national sororities have chapters at the College: 

Alpha Kappa Alpha 
Delta Sigma Theta 
Zeta Phi Beta 
Iota Phi Lambda 
Sigma Gamma Rho 

Pan-Hellenic Council 

The Pan-Hellenic Council is a federation of all fraternities and sororities 
on the campus. Its membership is composed of elected representatives 
from each Greek-letter organization. The main purpose is joint action for 
maintaining high standards in fraternity and sorority life at the institution. 

OTHER ORGANIZATIONS 
College 4-H Club 

The Collegiate 4-H Club is composed of students who have had previous 
experiences as 4-H Club members in high school. An informal meeting of 
a business and social nature is held monthly. Honorary members may be 
elected to the club from time to time. 

The Collegiate NFA Club 

The Collegiate Chapter of the New Farmers of America is composed of 
agricultural students who are former NFA members or who are trainees 
enrolled in the teacher-training department of the School of Agriculture. 
The purpose of the collegiate chapter is to give training and experience to 
students who will later become teachers of vocational agriculture. Honor- 
ary members may be elected to the collegiate chapter of the New Farmers 
of America. 

The Agricultural Association 

The Agricultural Association is composed of agricultural students. It 
meets twice monthly for business and social purposes. Honorary members 
may be elected to the association from time to time. 



General Information 39 

The College Bands 

The several college bands occupy an important place in the life of the 
institution. The Band Department is complete with full instrumentation 
and equipment for the many varied activities of marching and concert 
organizations. Expert instruction in all band instruments is given by a 
staff of trained bandmasters. The organizations in the Band Department 
are as follows: 

1. Senior Bands — The 100-piece marching group for the many athletic 
events that take place in the fall. This is open to those students who 
have four or more years of experience on a band instrument. Also, 
the 80-piece symphony concert group is open only to those qualified 
students who successfully audition for entrance. 

Foreign Language Clubs 

Le Cercle Francais and El Circulo Espanol meet once a month during 
the academic year. 

The Fortnightly Club 

The Fortnightly Club offers its members an opportunity to discuss some 
of the literary works which have influenced the intellectual, spiritual, and 
cultural development of Western Civilization. Interested students will be 
encouraged to present their creative endeavors for discussion and evaluation. 

The Debating Society 

The Kappa Phi Forensic Society, better known as the Debating Society, 
is designed to stimulate interest in public speaking and debate. It is com- 
posed of college students who have distinguished themselves in public 
performances in these fields. The Society awards a certificate of merit 
to any graduating senior who has participated in non-varsity debates or 
who has otherwise rendered meritorious service to the Kappa Phi Kappa 
Forensic Society for at least two years. 

The Richard B. Harrison Players 

The drama society of the Agricultural and Technical College offers its 
members experience in writing, staging, and directing plays as well as 
experience in acting. The opportunity is advantageous not only to those 
who are interested in the theatre but also to those who, at some time in 
the future, may be asked to direct a play. 

The Stylus 

The Stylus is an organization composed of students interested in creative 
writing, has as its primary purpose the opening of new and wider avenues 
to the student who wishes to share his creative experience with others. 

Choral Organizations 

The College Choir, the Men's Glee Club, the Women's Glee Club, and the 
Concert Choir have won for themselves an enviable reputation for the gen- 
uine artistry of their work. These organizations, open to all qualified stu- 



40 The Agricultural and Technical College 

dents, offer extra-curricular activity which is at once instructive and en- 
joyable. 

The P.EM. Club 

The P.E.M. Club is an organization to promote professional growth and 
to encourage fellowship among physical education major and minor stu- 
dents. Membership is open to all students who have successfully completed 
preliminary requirements and have been accepted as majors or minors in 
the Department of Health and Physical Education. 

The Dance Group 

The Modern Dance Club presents an opportunity for students to learn 
and create various types of dances. Members of the group participate in 
local and regional programs annually. This organization is open to all in- 
terested students. Dance Club members are eligible for intramural awards. 

The Student Nurse Organization 

The Student Nurse Organization is called the TELOCA, (TEnder-LOving- 
CAre), and functions in conjunction with the North Carolina Student Nurses 
Association. Its objectives are as follows: 

1. To assist the student in her growth as a member of a democratic 
society. 

2. To serve as a channel of communication between student nurses and 
faculty members. 

3. To plan social and professional activities for the students. 

4. To cooperate with the State Student Nurse Association of North 
Carolina and the American Nurses' Association in working for the 
professional and educational advancement of nursing. 

Art Circle 

The Art Circle is a student professional organization for those who are 
majoring or minoring in the Fine Arts. Its purpose is the development of 
further interest in the visual arts through study and application. 

College Usher Board 

The College Usher Board is composed of students. They serve at re- 
ligious services and on special occasions such as Founder's Day, Christmas, 
and Easter Programs, Baccalaureate and Commencement Exercises. 

Army ROTC Cadet Welfare Council 

The Army ROTC Cadet Welfare Council is an organization composed of 
all students enrolled in the Army ROTC program. The purpose of this 
organization is to promote a spirit of cooperation among the cadets and 
to promote civic activities in the interest of the college and the ROTC. 
Annual dues are $4.00 payable upon initial registration for the school year. 



General Information 41 

Pershing Rifles 

An expert drill team composed of ROTC cadet volunteers from the fresh- 
man and sophomore classes. It improves the coordination and precision 
drill ability of its members. The team performs at football games and 
gives other public exhibitions. In addition it functions for visiting digni- 
taries and provides an advertising media for A. & T. College. The Pershing 
Rifles Drill Team reflects the high standard and Esprit de Corps of the 
A. & T. College Army ROTC. 

A&T College Rifle Team 

An organization to teach members proper firing techniques for record 
firing with the .22 caliber rifle. This team represents the college in com- 
petition with other ROTC units throughout the southeast and several trips 
are planned each year to nearby schools. It operates under the auspices of 
the central Intercollegiate Athletic Association. An Army ROTC rifle team 
is maintained for competition within the Army ROTC program. 

ROTC Band 

Membership is confined to freshman and sophomore cadets who play 
band instruments. The Band plays for drill periods and ceremonies. 

National Society of Scabbard and Blade 

National Society of Scabbard and Blade: Company B, 10th Regiment of 
the National Society of Scabbard and Blade is a professional military fra- 
ternity with membership restricted to cadet officers. The fraternity has 
the mission of developing unity and Esprit de Corps within the cadet 
organization. The Scabbard and Blade Society assists the college and De- 
partment of Military Science in many activities. 

ROTC Officer's Club 

The cadet officers' club provides cadets with an opportunity to demon- 
strate organizational leadership ability and to promote social and cultural 
activities. Each advanced cadet is automatically a member of the club. 
The cadet officers' annual formal ROTC Banquet is one of the highlights 
of the college social season. This club is composed of both the Army and 
Air Force ROTC. 

LOANS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PRIZES 

KAPPA ALPHA PSI FRATERNITY SCHOLARSHIP— Alpha Nu Chap- 
ter of the Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity annually awards a scholarship of 
$50 to the highest ranking freshman during the fall quarter. In the event 
of a tie, the two top-ranking freshmen are awarded scholarships of $25 each. 

A. AND T. COLLEGE ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIPS— Four scholarship 
grants of $1,000 each are given annually by the Agricultural and Technical 
College Alumni Association to entering freshmen students who earn the 
highest scores in special competitive college entrance examinations. The 
grants are made in annual installments of $250 each, renewable upon the 
condition that the student maintains a certain minimum standard each year. 



42 The Agricultural and Technical College 

The examinations are administered during the spring at several testing 
centers throughout the State of North Carolina. Announcement of time 
and place of the examinations is made through the high schools and pub- 
licity media. Prospective graduates of accredited high schools in or out of 
state, ranking in the upper fourth of their classes, are eligible to take the 
examinations without charge. 

KROGER SCHOLARSHIPS— The Kroger Scholarship Plan provides two 
scholarships per year of $250 each. One scholarship offers aid to a fresh- 
man majoring in home economics, and the other to a freshman majoring 
in agriculture. Awards are made on the basis of scholastic achievement 
in high school, leadership qualities demonstrated, and financial need. 

SEARS, ROEBUCK FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIPS— The Sears, Roe- 
buck Foundation makes available each year nine scholarships worth $200 
each to freshman students who enroll in the School of Agriculture. These 
scholarships are awarded to majors in agriculture and in home economics, 
on the basis of scholastic aptitude of the applicants. Preference is also 
given to those who would be unable to attend college without this aid. 

SMITH-DOUGLAS N.F.A. SCHOLARSHIPS— Two scholarships are given 
annually to aid incoming freshmen who major in agriculture. They are 
worth $500 each. Recipients receive $150 during their freshman and sopho- 
more years, and $100 during their junior and senior years, provided they 
maintain a satisfactory scholastic record. Applicants must be residents of 
North Carolina, and must have been active members of a local chapter of 
the New Farmers of America. These scholarships are awarded on the 
basis of need, scholastic aptitude, potentialities for leadership, and achieve- 
ment in farming. Applications should be filed with the Executive Secretary 
of the N.F.A. by June of each year. 

BURLINGTON INDUSTRIES FOUNDATION— The Burlington Indus- 
tries Foundation provides two $1,000 scholarships for students in engineer- 
ing. These are paid over a period of two years at the rate of $500 each 
for the junior and senior years of college. The students are selected by 
the engineering faculty on the basis of scholarship, leadership, and financial 
need. 

THE CHARLES L. COOPER AWARD— Mu Psi Chapter of the Omega 
Psi Phi Fraternity presents annually this award in memory of Dr. Charles 
L. Cooper, a former professor of industrial education at the Agricultural 
and Technical College. It is presented to the student in industrial arts 
with the highest average above two points. (2.00) 

THE REGISTER AWARD— As a means of promoting a wider interest 
and greater activity on the part of the students in the field of journalism, 
the College Register awards a gold key to those members of the graduating 
class who complete a period of at least two years of meritorius service as 
members of the Register staff. 

ALUMNI ATHLETIC AWARD— The Philadelphia branch of the Agri- 
cultural and Technical College Alumni Association awards a gold medal 



General Information 43 

each year to the student of the graduating class making the best record 
in major intercollegiate sports. 

ALUMNI SERVICE AWARD— The Gate City Chapter (Greensboro) of 
the Agricultural and Technical College Alumni Association makes an 
award each year to that member of the graduating class, voted by the 
Executive Committee of the Faculty as having rendered the "most dis- 
tinctive service to the College and to the community." 

KAPPA PHI KAPPA KEY— The Kappa Phi Kappa Key was first 
awarded in 1928 by the Debating Society. The key is awarded to each mem- 
ber of the graduating class who has been a speaker on the College varsity 
debating team for two years. 

DEBATING TROPHY— The Rand-Hawkins-McRae debating trophy was 
provided by Messrs. J. M. Rand, J. A. Hawkins and S. D. McRae, graduates 
of the College, Class of 1906, and is awarded annually to the members of 
the graduating class who have completed at least three years of varsity 
debating 

FRESHMAN-SOPHOMORE DEBATING TROPHY— The College pre- 
sents to the winning team at the annual Freshman-Sophomore debate, a 
debating trophy with the name of the class and the year of the debate. 
This trophy signifies the increasing interest in oratory and research, and 
serves as an incentive for freshman and sophomore achievement in the 
forensic arts. 

BROTHERHOOD AWARD— The Brotherhood Award of $50 is presented 
by Mr. Ralph Johns of Greensboro to the student who has done most to 
promote brotherhood and goodwill. 

THE HOME ECKERS SCHOLARSHIP— A scholarship award of $25 will 
be given to the home economics student who has maintained a grade aver- 
age of 3.00 and has completed 100 quarter hours. She must also have met 
other standards set up by the club. This scholarship is to be used to assist 
in defraying her college expenses. 

THE RALPH JOHNS ATHLETIC SCHOLARSHIP— The Ralph Johns 
Athletic Scholarship of $100 is presented by Mr. Ralph Johns of Greens- 
boro, North Carolina, to foster sportsmanship, leadership, and manliness 
in competitive sports. 

MEDALS 

The John Merrick Medal will be awarded to the student completing the 
four-year mechanical course with the best record in the college department. 

The William Andrew Rhodes Medal will be awarded to the student hav- 
ing good character and making the best record in musical activities during 
the school year. This award is sponsored by Dr. William Andrew Rhodes, 
composer, teacher, and conductor. 

The M. F. Spaulding Medal will be awarded to the student completing 
the full four-year course in agriculture with the best record. 



44 The Agricultural and Technical College 

The Saslow's, Inc. Medal will be awarded (a) to the member of the 
graduating class who completes the four-year course in the School of Edu- 
cation and General Studies with the best record, and (b) to the student who 
graduates with the best record in social sciences. 

STUDENT LOAN FUND 

The Agricultural and Technical College Student Aid Fund was estab- 
lished by the Student Council of 1946-1947 to provide a source of revenue 
for loans to deserving students. This fund is supported by contributions 
from students, faculty members, and campus organizations. Any regular 
term student, duly registered, is eligible to apply for aid through this fund. 

THE NATIONAL DEFENSE STUDENT LOAN PROGRAM 

The Agricultural and Technical College participates in the National De- 
fense Student Loan Program. This program was authorized by Public Law 
85-864, the National Defense Education Act of 1958. It provides a loan 
fund from which undergraduate and graduate students may borrow on 
reasonable terms for the purpose of completing their higher education. A 
student must be a citizen of the United States, enrolled as a full-time 
undergraduate or graduate student in order to be eligible for a loan. Ap- 
plication forms and additional information may be obtained from the Ad- 
ministrative Assistant to the President, The Agricultural and Technical 
College, Greensboro, North Carolina. 

NORTH CAROLINA RURAL REHABILITATION CORPORATION 
STUDENT LOAN PROGRAM 

Loans under this program are available to needy and worthy North 
Carolina farm boys and girls who plan to study agriculture or home eco- 
nomics. The loans bear interest at the rate of four percent per annum. 
Application forms and additional information may be obtained from North 
Carolina Rural Rehabilitation Corporation, Post Office Box 2403, Raleigh. 
North Carolina. 

DEPORTMENT 

Students will be expected to conduct themselves properly at all times. 
Any student who shows an unwillingness to conform to the rules and regu- 
lations that are prescribed or that may be prescribed to govern the stu- 
dent body will be asked to withdraw from the institution. Furthermore, 
any student whose deportment or behavior is not in harmony with the 
ideals or interests of the College will be suspended or expelled. 

A student automatically forfeits his privilege of working for pay at the 
College when, for any reason, he is placed on probation because of mis- 
conduct. 



General Information 



45 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

GENERAL EXPENSES 

The average quarter's expenses, for a full-time student — graduate, undergraduate, or 
special, amount to $114.20 for day students, $199.70 for boarding only students, and $246.70 
for boarding and lodging students. Out-of-State Students pay an additional $83.34. Travel, 
clothing, and personal expenses will vary according to the individual's spending customs 
and habits. 

TUITION FEES & CHARGES FOR REGULAR SESSION NINE MONTHS TERM 



Regular Student Fees Day 

Tuition, North Carolina Students $150.00 

(Tuition — Out-of-State Students) (400.00) 

Registration Fee 6.60 

Course Fee 25.50 

Library Fee 3.00 

Lecture — Lyceum Fee 3.90 

Guidance Fee 15.00 

Day Student Occupancy Fee 49.50 

Lodging 

Board 

Laundry and Dry Cleaning 

Medical Fee 18.00 

Book Rental Fee 36.00 

Athletic Fee 24.00 

Student Activity Fees : 

College Register 3.00 

College Annual 4.50 

General Activities 3.00 

Student Aid .60 

Total— North Carolina Students 342.60 

(Total— Out-of-State Students) (592.60) 



Boarding 


Boarding 


Only 


Lodging 


$150.00 


$150.00 


(400.00) 


(400.00) 


6.60 


6.60 


25.50 


25.50 


3.00 


3.00 


3.90 


3.90 


15.00 


15.00 


36.00 






150.00 


270.00 


270.00 




27.00 


18.00 


18.00 


36.00 


36.00 


24.00 


24.00 


3.00 


3.00 


4.50 


4.50 


3.00 


3.00 


.60 


.60 


599.10 


740.10 


(849.10) 


(990.10) 



SPECIAL FEES AND DEPOSITS 



Admission Reservation Deposit (non-refundable— payable with application 

and yearly thereafter ; applied on account after entrance) $10.00 

R.O.T.C. Uniform Deposit — Male Students (payable upon registration 

in military classes) 10.00 

High School Deficiency Fee Per Course Per Quarter (payable in 

advance of course registration) 4.00 

Late Registration Fee 5.00 

Practice Teaching Fee (other than Vocational Agriculture) 35.00 

Driver Education Laboratory Fee Per Course — Regular Session or 

Summer School 6.00 

Senior Engineering Inspection Tour Fee 50.00 

Dormitory Key Deposit — Refundable 1.00 

Master's Thesis Binding Fee — Three Copies 20.00 

Certificate Fee — Trades 4.00 

Diploma Fee — Bachelor's 5.00 

Diploma Fee — Master's 15.00 

Cap and Gown Rental Fee — Bachelor's 5.25 

Cap and Gown Rental Fee — Master's 8.25 

Lost Meal Tickets Replacement Fee (per month) 5.00 

Lost Activity Tickets Replacement Fee (per quarter) 1.00 

Transcript of Record (after first one) 1.00 

Day Student Infirmary Meal Charges (per meal taken while confined) 50 

Ambulance Service (each trip) 2.00 

Auditing Course Fee — North Carolina Students (per quarter hour) 5.00 

Auditing Course Fee — Out-of-State Students (per quarter hour) 13.34 

Part-Time Student Fee Rates (same as regular full-time students 

except as follows:) 

Tuition — North Carolina Students (per quarter hour — maximum 

$50 per quarter) 5.00 

Tuition — Out-of-State Students (per quarter hour — maximum 

$133.34 per quarter) 13.34 

Course Fee (per quarter hour — maximum $8.50 per quarter) 85 

Day Student Occupancy Fee (per quarter hour — maximum 

$16.50 per quarter) 1.65 

Boarding — Day Student Occupancy Fee (per quarter hour — 

maximum $12.00 per quarter) 1.20 

Book Rental Fee (per quarter hour — maximum $12.00 per quarter) 1.20 

Guidance Fee (per quarter hour — maximum $5.00 per quarter) 50 

Athletic Fee (per quarter hour — maximum $8.00 per quarter) 80 

Medical Fee (per quarter hour — maximum $6.00 per quarter) 60 



46 



The Agricultural and Technical College 





Part-Time 


; 5.00 


Per Qtr. Hour 


13.34 


Per Qtr. Hour 


2.20 


Per Registration 


.85 


Per Qtr. Hour 


1.00 


Per Registration 


1.30 


Per Registration 


.50 


Per Qtr. Hour 


4.25 


Per Week 


.50 


Per Meal 


2.40 


Minimum 


1.20 


Per Qtr. Hour 


1.00 


Minimum 



SUMMER SCHOOL FEES— GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

4 weeks 6 weeks 10 weeks 

Tuition — North Carolina Students ... $ 30.00 $ 45.00 $ 50.00 

(Tuition— Out-of-State Students) (80.04) (120.06) (133.34) 

Registration Fee 2.20 2.20 2.20 

Course Fee 5.10 7.65 8.50 

Library Fee 1.00 1.00 1.00 

Lecture — Lyceum Fee 1.30 1.30 1.30 

Guidance Fee 3.00 4.50 5.00 

Lodging 17.00 25.50 42.50 

Board 42.00 63.00 106.50 

Medical Fee 2.40 3.60 6.00 

Book Rental Fee 7.20 10.80 12.00 

Student Activity Fee — Entertainment 1.00 2.00 3.00 

Total North Carolina Student 112.20 166.55 238.00 

(Total Out-of-State Student) (162.24) (241.61) (321.34) 

PAYMENTS 

Remittances of money for school expenses should be made by certified check, bank draft, 
postal money order, or cash if paid in person or by registered mail and made payable to 
A. & T. College. All such payments should be addressed to Bursar's Office, A. & T. College, 
Greensboro, North Carolina. It is necessary that all payments be made promptly to avoid 
great inconvenience to the student. The College cannot extend credit in anticipation of 
expected funds from any source. 

All accounts are payable in full on or before registration in each quarter. However, a 
student may elect to pay his account in accordance with the following schedule of install- 

Boarding Boarding & 

North Carolina Students Day Only Lodging 

ment payments. 
Entrance Payments: Fall, Winter & Spring 

Quarters Each $114.20 $114.70 114.70 

Second Installment : 10th of 1st month following 

registration 42.50 66.00 

Third Installment: 10th of 2nd month following 

registration 42.50 66.00 

Total for each quarter— N. C. Student $114.20 $199.70 $246.70 

Out-of-State Student 

Add to entrance payment each quarter 83.34 83.34 83.34 

Total for each quarter — Out-of-State Students ....$197.54 $283.04 $330.04 

Summer school students enrolling for either the six week or 10 week session may elect 
to pay their accounts in two equal installments. The first installment must be paid upon 
registration. The second installment is due and payable one month after registration. 

Diplomas and transcripts of record are withheld until the student has paid in full all 
fees and charges due the college. Further, a student in debt to the college in any amount 
will not be admitted to final examinations in any course, nor will he be permitted to 
register for any subsequent quarter until his obligations are paid. Failure to make sched- 
uled payments when due will cause the student to be dropped from school for non-payment 
of fees. 

AUDITORS 

Auditing of courses is open to any person, without credit, upon the payment of tuition 
fees required at the rate of $5.00 per quarter hour for North Carolina residents or $13.34 
per quarter hour for out-of-state residents. An auditor is not required to participate in 
class discussions, prepare assignments or take examinations. 

REFUNDS 

Refunds upon withdrawal of a student for any reason will be made less any amounts 
due the college as follows : 

1. Lodging : Days room not occupied, at the rate of sixty cents per day from time of 
official withdrawal. 

2. Board : Unused meal tickets at the rate of thirty-five cents from date of official with- 
drawal. 

3. Laundry : Value of unused laundry tickets at the time of withdrawal — not to exceed 
$3.00 per month. 

4. Tuition : Course Fee and Occupancy Fee : 90 per cent when withdrawal is within one 
week of registration date. 

75 per cent when withdrawal is within two weeks of registration date. 
60 per cent when withdrawal is within three weeks of registration date. 
45 per cent when withdrawal is within four weeks of registration date. 
30 per cent when withdrawal is within five weeks of registration date. 
15 per cent when withdrawal is within six weeks of registration date. 
None when withdrawal is after six weeks. 

5. No refunds are made on any other fees which include Registration Fee, Library Fee, 
Lecture Fee, Guidance Fee, Medical Fee, Book Rental Fee, Athletic Fee and the Stu- 
dent Activity Fees. 



General Information 47 

SPECIAL NOTICES AND EXPLANATIONS 

The College reserves the right to Increase or decrease all fees and charges as well as 
add or delate items of expense without advance notice as circumstances, in the judgement 
of the administration, may require. 

Room and board rates are based on the average cost of operations for the entire school 
year which includes provision for services only during the scheduled operational days. Al- 
lowances have, therefore, been made for holidays when these facilities are closed. 

With the exception of special cases in which permission has been obtained from the 
Dean of Students, students from outside the city of Greensboro are required to reside in 
the College dormitories and take board in the College cafeterias. 

Students' property in dormitories and other college buildings is at the sole risk of the 
owner and the College is not responsible for loss or theft of, or damage to such property, 
arising from any cause. 

Students are -required to pay for any loss of, or damage to college property at replace- 
ment cost due to abuse, negligence or malicous action, in addition to being subject to 
disciplinary action. 

SELF-HELP 

The institution cannot guarantee jobs to students who expect to work their way 
through college. Many students find work in private families and in other occupations, 
and thereby defray a portion of their expenses. A person of ability and energy who can 
do work of any kind can generally find employment, but prospective students are cau- 
tioned against depending upon such unreliable sources of income. 

*SPECIAL NOTICE TO KOREAN VETERANS 
(Payment of Fees) 

Public Law 550, 82nd Congress, differs from the law which provided educational benefits 

to veterans of World War II. One difference is the fact that under the law, the Veterans' 

Administration pays no money to the school for veterans' training. All money is paid 

directly to the veteran in the form of a monthly subsistence allowance as follows : 

Veteran with no dependents $110 

Veteran with one dependent 135 

Veteran with two or more dependents „ 160 

The veteran, therefore, is responsible for the meeting of all of his expenses. Usually two 
or three months elapse befor the veteran receives his first check, so the veteran should be 
prepared to meet his expenses for the first three months. It is advisable to have, in addi- 
tion to the money for regular College fees, enough to purchase supplies, and incidentals. 

Public Law 550 allows only one change in program. Therefore, the veteran should obtain 
vocational and educational counseling through the Veteran's Administration or through 
the College before enrolling in college. The veteran may obtain counseling through the 
Veterans' Administration by simply checking item No. 14 "yes" on the Application for 
Program of Education and Training form. Guidance may be obtained at the College by 
visiting the College Guidance Center. 



* This does not apply to disabled Korean Veterans. 



GENERAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 




Mu&jikJL fc ** 



.^ .mi il- * 



Admission Procedure 

Admission Requirements 

Admission to the School of Nursing 

Transfer Students 

Special Students 

Filing of Credentials 

Re-Admission of Former Students 

Registration 

Classification of Students 

Student Load and Scholastic Standards 

Scholastic Requirements 

Class Attendance 

Quarterly Examinations 

Changes in Schedules 

Changing Schools 

Failures 

Incompletes 

Withdrawal From College 

Honor Roll 

Degrees and Graduation Requirements 

Graduation With Honors 

Out-of-State Students 

Graduation Under a Particular 

Catalog 



General Academic Regulations 51 

GENERAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

Admission Procedure 

A student who wishes to enter The Agricultural and Technical College 
of North Carolina for the first time will be considered for admission if: 

1. The student has graduated from high school with not less than 16 
units of credit. 

2. The student is transferring from another accredited college or uni- 
versity and is in good standing and has a cumulative average equiva- 
lent to "C" or above. 

3. The student has graduated from an accredited college or university 
and wishes to enter the Graduate School. 

Procedure for New Students 

1. Write to the Director of Admissions for an application for admission. 
Fill it out properly and return it to the Office of Admissions. 

2. Arrange for the transcript the academic records from high school 
and/or college or university previously attended to be sent directly to 
the Director of Admissions. 

3. All candidates for admission to the freshman class must take the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test prior to official registration. This test is 
administered by the College Entrance Examination Board several 
times each year at centers throughout the United States and many 
foreign countries. Testing dates are regularly scheduled in December, 
January, March, May, and August. Applicants should obtain Bul- 
letins of Information, including application blanks, directly from 
their high school principals or guidance counselors. If these are not 
available in the school, applicants should write directly to the Col- 
lege Entrance Examination Board, Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey, 
for a list of testing dates and centers so that assignments may be 
made to the center nearest to the applicant's residence. 
Out-of-State applicants must have graduated from an accredited high 
school and be in the upper two-thirds of their class. 

4. After the completed application form, transcripts, and test results 
are received, they will be evaluated, and if approved, the student 
will receive a letter of admission and a permit to register. If the ap- 
plication for admission is not approved, the applicant will be notified 
accordingly with a statement about his deficiencies. 

5. Each candidate for the Freshman Class, to reside on the campus, is 
expected to arrive on the campus the day preceding the date designated 
on the college calendar for freshman orientation. All freshmen should 
be present by 8:00 A.M. on the first day. 

The permit to register furnished beforehand by the Director of Ad- 
missions indicating the School or Department in which the applicant 
wishes to register must be ready for presentation to proper authori- 
ties. The dates indicated in the college calendar for freshman orienta- 



52 The Agricultural and Technical College 

tion and registration as well as those for upper-classmen must be 
strictly observed. Those seeking registration after the scheduled date 
must pay a late registration fee of $5.00. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Entrance Units 

High School graduates should present the following entrance credits, 
distributed as shown below: 

Subject Number of Units 

English 4 

*Mathematics 2 

Social Studies (Preferably U. S. History) 1 

Natural Science 1 

Electives 8 

Total 16 

The elective units may be selected from any other high school courses. 
However, students may not present more than two (2) units in activity 
courses, such as music and physical education, and not more than four 
(4) units in vocational courses. 

Students who plan to major in science or business must have one unit 
of algebra and one unit of plane geometry. 

Students who plan to major in engineering, mathematics and physics 
must have one and one-half units of algebra, one unit of plane geometry, 
and one-half unit of solid geometry. 

Conditional Admission 

Students who present sixteen (16) acceptable entrance units but do not 
meet the entrance requirements in mathematics listed immediately above 
must take special non-credit courses to meet these deficiencies. This de- 
ficiency removal must begin immediately upon enrollment in the first year 
of study. 

, Admission to the School of Nursing 

Applicants for admission to the School of Nursing should write directly 
to the Dean, School of Nursing. 

1. These applicants will receive special application forms and instruc- 
tions. 

2. These forms must be returned to the Dean, School of Nursing, and 
two (2) transcripts of the high school and any college record must 
be sent directly from the school or college previously attended to 
the Dean. 



* Students who plan to major in Nursing or Home Economics may enter with only one 
unit of mathematics. 



General Academic Regulations 53 

3. In addition to the credentials mentioned above, all applicants are 
required to take the Pre Nursing and Guidance Examination and must 
make a satisfactory score on this examinatior. 

4. Upon receipt of the completed application form and the required 
credentials, the Dean of the School of Nursing will send to the appli- 
cant a schedule of dates and places where the Pre-Nursing and Guid- 
ance Examination may be taken. Successful candidates will receive 
their admission papers from the Dean, and other candidates will be 
informed as to why they are not admitted to the nursing program. 

5. Candidates who fail the Pre-Nursing and Guidance Examination, but 
who present satisfactory high school records and pass the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test, may request that their application papers be trans- 
ferred to the Director of Admission and request consideration for 
admission to another specified School of the College. 

Transfer Students 

1. Applications from transfer students cannot be considered until all 
credentials are received from the high school and each other institu- 
tion previously attended. In addition, there must be a statement of 
good standing and honorable dismissal from these institutions. 

2. Previous college records must show a cumulative average not below 
"C". Even with a cumulative average of "C" or above, no course is 
accepted in which a grade below "C" was originally earned. 

3. Accepted courses are recorded to the student's credit, but grade 
points are not calculated on the transferred courses. The grade points 
for a transfer student are calculated only on the courses taken here 
and a student must do more than half of his required studies here 
in order to be considered an honor graduate. 

Special Students 

In exceptional cases, an applicant of mature years, with special training 
along particular lines or of long experience in special fields of knowledge, 
may be admitted to the college to pursue a non-degree program or to study 
certain subjects as special students. Even though they do not satisfy 
regular entrance requirements, such persons must submit evidence of 
ability to profit from such a program and must do a passing grade of work 
or forfeit the privilege accorded them. These persons must: 

1. Request of the Director of Admissions an application form, fill it in 
and return it with : 

(A) Records of previous educational experiences. 

(B) Other documentary evidence of ability to pursue the courses 
desired. 

(C) A statement of the applicant's objectives or purposes in pur- 
suing studies chosen. 



54 The Agricultural and Technical College 

Filing of Credentials 

Applicants should take the proper steps to see that their credentials, 
(transcripts, etc.). are sent to the Director of Admissions as early as 
possible, preferably not less than thirty (30) days before the beginning of 
the quarter in which they plan to enroll. 

Re-Admission of Former Students 

Former students who interrupted their studies for one or more quarters 
before graduation need not fill out another application form, but must 
write to the Director of Admissions, properly identify themselves, and re- 
quest re-admission except in cases of dismissal for disciplinary or scholastic 
reasons. 

Students who were dismissed for scholastic reasons are to write to the 
Dean of Instruction and request processing for possible re-admission and 
await a reply with a permit to register before presenting themselves for 
registration. 

Students whose attendance has been interrupted by the College for dis- 
ciplinary reasons must apply to the Dean of Students if they wish a re- 
study of their cases for possible re-admission. 

Registration 

The registration dates for each quarter are listed on the college calendar 
at the beginning of this catalog. Students are urged to register promptly 
on the dates shown and avoid the penalty of paying the LATE REGISTRA- 
TION FEE of $5.00. 

The full payment of fees is a part of the registration process and no 
student is registered and entitled to go to classes until the prescribed fees 
are paid. 



CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

(Freshmen) 

To be classified as a freshman, a student must have met the minimum 
standards for admission to A. and T. College. All entering freshmen will 
be required to take placement tests in English and Mathematics and Read- 
ing. All who fail will be assigned a remedial course. Students will be 
assigned to the Reading Classes on the bases of their performance on the 
Reading Test. 

(Sophomore) 

To be classified as a sophomore, a student must have completed a mini- 
mum of fifty hours of work open to freshmen and must have earned at 
least a 1.50 average. 

(Junior) 

To be classified as a junior, a student must have completed one hundred 
quarter hours of work required of sophomores, with at least a 1.70 average. 
No student will receive junior classification until all required freshman 
and sophomore courses have been completed. 



General Academic Regulations 55 

(Senior) 

To be classified as a senior, a student must have completed at least one 
hundred and fifty hours of required and major work, with at least a 1.90 
average. For graduation, a student must have an overall average of 2.00. 



STUDENT LOAD AND SCHOLASTIC STANDARDS 
(Quantitative) 

The unit of credit is the quarter hour. 

Full-time students are those who enroll for a minmium of twelve (12) 
hours of credit per quarter. 

The maximum load a student may carry is twenty-one (21) hours per 
quarter, including non-credit courses or evening courses. At least a "C" 
average is required to take more than 18 hours. 

SCHOLASTIC REQUIREMENTS 

(Qualitative) 

Students are expected to earn and maintain a general average of at least 
"C", having a grade point average of 2.00 on the four-point (4.00) system 
shown below: 

(Grading System) 

Grade Points 

93-100— A Excellent 4 

82- 92— B Good 3 

71- 81— C Fair 2 

60- 70— D Poor, but Passing 1 

Below 60 — F Failure 

W Withdrew 

I Incomplete 

To continue at The Agricultural and Technical College, a student must 
meet the qualitative standards that are required. The qualitative averages 
are computed on work attempted and on a cumulative basis. The following 
graduated scale of cumulative grade point averages must be maintained: 

Periods Averages 

At the end of three (3) quarters 1.50 

At the end of six (6) quarters 1.70 

At the end of nine (9) quarters 1.90 

At the end of twelve (12) quarters 2.00 

If at the end of any quarter a student's grade point average falls below 
the accepted minimum for his period of residence, he will be sent a de- 
scriptive report of his performance and a "warning" by the Director of 
Admissions. The parents or guardians will be notified. At the end of the 
next quarter, he will be placed on academic probation if he has not met 
the minimum requirements of the institution. At the end of the following 
quarter, such a student will be suspended from the institution if his aver- 
age has not been met. After one quarter's suspension, the student may 



56 The Agricultural and Technical College 

return to the college on probation. Failure to attain the minimum average 
required, however, will result in permanent dismissal from the college. 

CLASS ATTENDANCE 

It is the regulation of the College that teachers keep accurate records 
of class attendance. Regular and punctual attendance is required of all 
students. A student who fails to attend classes regularly may be subject 
to disciplinary action. The following regulations will be observed with 
respect to class attendance: 

When a student is absent from class without approved excuse, more 
times than the number of quarter hour credits of the course, three 
(3) quarter hours will be added to his graduation requirements as a 
penalty. A student who receives a penalty for being absent in more 
than two classes will be dropped and will lose credit for the quarter. 
The second time a student is dropped for being absent from class, he 
will receive a permanent dismissal from the College. 

In order to receive credit for a course, a student must be present for 
two-thirds of the class session, regardless of excused absences. All excuses 
must be approved by the Dean of Students. 

QUARTERLY EXAMINATIONS 

A final examination will be required as a part of every course. An ex- 
amination schedule showing time and place of meeting of each course and 
section will be published quarterly. Schedules so published will be followed 
without variation except by special permission of the dean of the school 
in which the course is offered. 

CHANGES IN SCHEDULES 

A change in a student's class program may be made only with the con- 
sent of the Dean of the School in which the student is enrolled. The stu- 
dent must obtain written permission from his Dean, stipulating the spe- 
cific changes to be made, then report to the Office of the Director of Ad- 
missions to execute the proper forms in making the change. 

Students are allowed a period of one week at the beginning of each 
quarter for making these changes. 

CHANGING SCHOOLS 

Students may transfer from one School of the College to another with 
the written approval and acceptance of the Deans of the Schools involved. 
The proper forms on which to apply for such a change are to be obtained 
at the Office of the Director of Admissions and executed at least six weeks 
prior to the beginning of the following quarter. 

FAILURES 

At the very first opportunity, a student must repeat a required course 
which he has failed, unless the Dean of his School authorizes a suitable 



General Academic Regulations 57 

substitute course. A course which is pre-requisite to another in a sequence 
must be passed before taking the next course in the series. 

INCOMPLETES 

Students are expected to complete all requirements of the particular 
course during the quarter in which they are registered. However, if at the 
end of the quarter, a small portion of the work remains unfinished and 
can be completed without further class attendance, the grade for the stu- 
dent may be reported "Incomplete", providing his standing in the course 
is "Passing." For the student to secure credit, the work must be com- 
pleted within one month after the beginning of the succeeding quarter 
in residence. Otherwise, the grade automatically becomes "F". 

At the close of the quarter, each teacher will file with the Director of 
Admissions a list of names of students who have received "Incomplete" 
grades together with a statement of all work required to complete the course 
before a final grade can be reported to the Director of Admissions. 

After registration has been completed in the following quarter, and it 
has been determined that a student has registered, both he and the teacher 
will be notified by the Registrar of the outstanding "Incomplete" grade 
and of the fact that it must be removed within the prescribed period. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM COLLEGE 

A sudent who wishes, or is asked to leave the College at any time during 
the quarter shall fill in and file official withdrawal forms. These forms 
are obtained at the Office of the Dean of Students. They should be com- 
pletely executed in quadruplicate, (quintuplicate for veterans) and taken 
to the Bursar's Office. For failure to execute these forms, a student auto- 
matically incurs the penalty of receiving an "F" for each course in which 
he is enrolled that quarter. 

HONOR ROLL 

To encourage scholarship and integrity, the College publishes an Honor 
Roll at the end of each quarter. Regular students whose average grade 
in all courses is "B" shall be eligible for the Honor Roll. 

DEGREES AND GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

Graduation from The Agricultural and Technical College involves the 
satisfaction of the following requirements: 

1. The candidate for a degree must have selected a specific curriculum, 
having the approval of the Dean of the School in which he is regis- 
tered. This curriculum must have been completed. 

2. Whether registered in Agriculture, Education and General Studies, 
or Engineering, he must complete at least 200 quarter hours and 400 
grade points. 

3. The credit hours must aggregate at least 200, including the required 



58 The Agricultural and Technical College 

courses in military science and physical education. The grade points 
must equal 2 times the number of credit hours undertaken whether 
passed or failed. After securing 200 credit hours, if the student is 
deficient in grade points, he must take additional courses to secure 
these points. The student must obtain an average of 2.00 or more 
in his major field. A minimum of one year of residence is required. 

4. It is the aim of the institution to send forth men and women who 
are fit representatives. To this end, the College reserves the right to 
refuse to admit any student to the Senior Class or to graduate any- 
one who though qualified by class record may otherwise seem unfit. 

5. Payment of diploma fee of five dollars ($5.00) must be made to the 
Bursar on or before February 2, preceding graduation. 

6. Students in the graduating class must clear all conditions by the 
end of the quarter preceding graduation. 

7. Candidates for graduation must file an application for graduation 
upon the form provided in the Office of the Director of Admissions at 
least four months prior to the date they expect to graduate. 

8. Candidates for certificates in two-year or terminal programs are 
required to attain at least an over-all "C" average to fulfill require- 
ments for graduation. 

GRADUATION WITH HONORS 

Graduation honors are awarded candidates who complete all require- 
ments for graduation in accordance with the following stipulations: (1) 
Those who maintain a general average within the range of 3.00 to 3.24 
will receive CUM LAUDE, (2) those who maintain a general average 
within the range from 3.25 to 3.49 will receive MAGNA CUM LAUDE, 
and (3) those who maintain a general average within the range of 3.50 
to 4.00 will receive SUMMA CUM LAUDE. Publication of honors and 
scholarships is made at graduation and in the College Catalog. 

DEGREES 

All students successfully completing any of the four-year courses of 
study shall be entitled to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

1. Those graduating from a four-year curriculum offered in the School 
of Engineering shall be entitled to the Bachelor of Science degree in 
Architectural Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical En- 
gineering, Engineering Mathematics, Engineering Physics, Business, 
Fine Arts, and Industrial Education. 

2. Those graduating from a four-year curriculum in the School of Agri- 
culture shall be entitled to the Bachelor of Science degree in Agricul- 
tural Chemistry, Biology and Home Economics. 



General Academic Regulations 59 

3. Students successfully completing a curriculum in the School of Edu- 
cation and General Studies shall be entitled to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science. 

4. Those graduating from the four-year curriculum in the School of 
Nursing shall be entitled to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 

Nursing. 

The Master of Science degree will be awarded those meeting require- 
ments for same. 

OUT-OF-STATE STUDENTS 

The following method is to be applied by all public instiutions of higher 
education in determining the in-state or out-of-state residency status of 
students : 

1. If the student's record upon original admission shows that he grad- 
uated from (or, if not a graduate, that he last attended) a high school 
located in North Carolina, and the student claims North Carolina residency, 
such student will be presumed to be a bona fide resident of North Carolina 
unless facts suggesting the contrary appear at that time or later during the 
student's attendance. If such contrary information appears, the business 
office will inquire into the facts and will require the student to submit, in 
writing, satisfactory proof that at the time of his original registration his 
claim to North Carolina residency was based upon substantial facts exclu- 
sive of the convenience of his education. 

2. If the student's record upon original admission shows that he grad- 
uated from a high school (or, if not a graduate, that he last attended a 
high school) located outside the State of North Carolina, the student will 
be presumed to be an out-of-state student at the first and all subsequent 
registrations unless he asserts in writing a claim to North Carolina resi- 
dency supported by. satisfactory written proof that his claim is based upon 
substantial facts exclusive of the convenience of his education. 

Qualification as to Certain Facts Submitted 
as Proof of Residency 

Proof of such facts as that (a) claimant has registered to vote in North 
Carolina (b) has an established local household for his dependents (c) 
has changed his motor vehicle registration in this State (d) has been 
assessed or has paid local or State taxes or (e) is currently employed in 
North Carolina, will not be adequate proof of bona fide residency unless 
it is shown that such facts existed continuously for the six months im- 
mediately preceding original admission to a public or private institution of 
higher education in North Carolina. When such fact has developed or pri- 
vate institution of higher education in North Carolina, it is to be re- 
garded as developing in consequence of the student's being in North Caro- 
lina for the purpose of education rather than for the purpose of bona 
fide residency. It is the student's obligation to supply any proofs needed 
to support his claim. 



60 The Agricultural and Technical College 

GRADUATION UNDER A PARTICULAR CATALOG 

A student may obtain a degree according to the requirements of the cata- 
log under which he first entered the college, provided the courses are being 
offered; or, he may choose to graduate under any catalog that is in effect 
during any subsequent year in which he is registered. The above provisions, 
however, are subject to the restriction that all requirements for a degree 
must be completed in five years from the date of the catalog chosen. 

A student may always graduate under the current catalog. 



SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 




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Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural 

Sociology 

Department of Agricultural Education 

Department of Animal Industry 

Department of Biology 

Department of Chemistry 

Department of Home Economics 

Department of Plant Science and Technology 

Department of Short Courses 



School of Agriculture 63 

SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 

Burleigh C. Webb, Dean 

Objectives and Philosophy. The School of Agriculture embraces the fun- 
damental philosophy of the Land-Grant College idea and accepts its obliga- 
tion to provide a program of resident and off-campus instruction adequate 
to serve the general needs of an interdependent rural-urban society and 
the special needs of all those who stand to benefit from instruction in 
agriculture, home economics, and the natural sciences including biology 
and chemistry; to extend the frontiers of knowledge and the professional 
competencies of its faculty and academic proficiency of its students through 
research; to share its resources with its clientele through organized short 
courses, conferences, and related activities designed to meet special needs. 

Departmental Organization. The School of Agriculture is organized into 
departments involving Technical Agriculture — (1) Agricultural Education, 

(2) Agricultural Economics, (3) Animal Industry, (4) Plant Science and 
Technology; (5) the Department of Home Economics; and the departments 
of the natural sciences — (6) Biology, and (7) Chemistry. 

The Department of Short Courses (8) co-ordinates the extended services 
of the other academic departments. State Subject-Matter Specialists in 
Agriculture, Supervisory and Administrative Personnel of (9) Agricultural 
and Home Economics Extension Service, and (10) Vocational Agriculture 
comprise associate departments. 

Requirements for Admission. The requirements for admission to the 
School of Agriculture are the same as the general requirements for admis- 
sion to the College. 

Requirements for Graduation. The requirements for graduation for the 
Bachelor of Science Degree in (1) Agriculture, (2) Biology, (3) Chemistry, 
or (4) Home Economics are as follows: 

1. The student must have satisfied the course requirements of an ap- 
proved curriculum in an organized department administered by the School 
of Agriculture. 

2. The student must have earned a cumulative average quality of at least 
a "C" in his major courses and in his overall academic program. 

Curricula. The curricula of the School of Agriculture are designed to 
provide the students who pursue courses of instruction leading to the 
Bachelor of Science Degree (1) a fundamental understanding of the basic 
physical and biological sciences which are applied to their respective 
majors; (2) liberal educational experiences offered by the College; and a 

(3) knowledge and competency required for specialization in any one of the 
major offerings: 

Major offerings are as follows: 

A. Technical Agriculture 

1. Agricultural Business 



64 The Agricultural and Technical College 

2. Agricultural Science 

3. Agricultural Technology 

B. Home Economics 

1. Home Economics Education 

2. Institution Management 

3. Nursery School Education 

4. Clothing 

5. Foods and Nutrition 

C. Natural Sciences 

1. Biology (Professional Major) 

2. Biology (Teaching Major) 

3. Chemistry (Professional Major) 

4. Chemistry (Teaching Major) 

A. The curricula and courses in Technical Agriculture are related to* 
career opportunities in the various fields: (1) Farm Production and Tech- 
nology, (2) Off-Farm Businesses and Industries related to farming and 
(3) Research and Education. In recognition that each of these fields re- 
quires a body of knowledge common to all, and that each has a body of 
knowledge distinctly peculiar to it, the curricula in Technology, Business, 
and Science are designed to provide certain required courses and at the 
same time provide a rather wide degree of flexibility which the student may 
use to his advantage by selecting courses in consultation with his faculty 
advisor that will meet his particular needs and objectives. These curricula 
are designed to serve the industry of agriculture specifically and the public 
in general. They provide educational opportunities for students interested 
in the many sectors of agricultural industries and the intellectual back- 
ground on which students can build satisfying lives through service. 

Agricultural Business. The Agricultural Business major is designed for 
those students interested in the business industry phase of Agriculture. 
The objective of the program of instruction in this major is to equip stu- 
dents for employment in those industries that furnish supplies and services 
to farmers and those that process, store, distribute, and merchandise the 
products of the farm. Graduates in this major are specially equipped for 
employment as salesmen, managers, public relations and technical super- 
visors with companies dealing with feed, seed, fertilizer, food processing 
and other such industries. 

Students who major in Agricultural Business will be expected to develop 
high competency in the area of Economics, Business, and Agricultural 
Economics, including selected courses that form a progressive sequence, or 
a combination that satisfies logical objectives, in Animal Industries, Plant 
Industries, and Dairy Manufacturing. 



School of Agriculture 65 

Agricultural Sciences. The Agricultural Sciences curriculum provides the 
student an opportunity to gain fundamental education and training for 
pursuing careers as animal and plant breeders, nutritionists, soil scientists, 
agricultural economists, veterinarians, and the like. The objective of this 
program is to provide an opportunity for the student to develop competency 
in the scientific disciplines essential to graduate study, scientific agricul- 
ture, and research. 

The major in Agricultural Sciences may, in the beginning of the soph- 
omore year, plan with his faculty advisor a program for specialization in 
one of the following areas: Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Engineer- 
ing, Animal Husbandry, Dairy Husbandry, Poultry Husbandry, Horticul- 
ture, Farm Crops, Soil Science, and Dairy Products. The students program 
will include appropriate supporting courses in Biology, Chemistry, Physics, 
Engineering, and Mathematics. 

Agricultural Technology. The curriculum in Agricultural Technology 
offers the student a program of study in Agricultural Education designed 
for developing competency in teaching and related types of work. The cur- 
riculum is especially suited for the student who aspires to become a teacher 
of Vocational Agriculture or Agricultural Extension. 

The student who wishes to major in Agricultural Education should, 
preferably at the beginning of the sophomore year or before his junior 
year, plan with his faculty advisor a course of study which will meet the 
certification requirements of teachers of Vocational Agriculture in North 
Carolina. If he does not plan to teach Vocational Agriculture, he may 
qualify for graduation by satisfying other professional education require- 
ments as approved by his departmental chairman and dean. 

The curriculum in Agricultural Technology also provides an opportunity 
to develop knowledge and skills in a specialized area of agricultural pro- 
duction. The program of instruction for the student who pursues this pro- 
gram places emphasis on the development of competency in the management 
and operation of commercial farms or in related fields that require spe- 
cialized knowledge and technical skills. 

The major in Agricultural Technology should, at the beginning of the 
sophomore year, plan in consultation with his faculty advisor courses of 
study for specialization in one of the following areas: Agricultural Educa- 
tion, Agricultural Engineering, Animal Husbandry, Dairying, Poultry Hus- 
bandry, Horticulture, Agronomy, and Dairy Manufacturing. 

B. The curricula leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Home 
Economics are offered in the area of (1) Clothing, (2) Foods and Nutrition, 
(3) Home Economics Education, (4) Institution Management, and (5) 
Nursery School Education. 

Outlines and curricula are carried in this Bulletin under the heading of 
Department of Home Economics. 

C. Two curricula are offered leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Biology. The Professional Curriculum is designed especially for the stu- 
dent who plans to study medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, or do 
graduate work and research. 



66 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



The Teaching Curriculum is designed to prepare science teachers for 
secondary schools. 

The Freshman program and course requirements for majors in Biology 
are listed in this Bulletin under the heading of the Department of Biology. 

The Professional Major and the Teaching Major are offered leading to 
the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemistry. 

The Professional major is for the student who plans to do graduate work 
and research and make a career in the field of Chemistry. 

The Teaching Major is designed to develop competency in the area of 
Chemistry and in education for certification as science teachers in secondary 
schools. 

The Freshman program and course requirements are outlined in this 
Bulletin under the Department of Chemistry. 

Graduate Instruction. The School of Agriculture offers the Master of 
Science Degree in Chemistry and in Agricultural Education. In addition, 
students seeking the Master of Science Degree in Education may be cer- 
tified in biology or chemistry. Graduate level courses that support the 
graduate programs in Agricultural Education are offered by the several 
departments in Technical Agriculture. 

Persons interested in the graduate programs should refer to the graduate 
bulletin. 



Suggested Programs in Technical Agriculture 

AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS 

Freshman Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Botany 101 — — 4 

Crop Science 111 — — 3 

English 101, 102, 103 5 5 5 

General Agriculture 101, 102, 103 1 1 1 

Mathematics 111, 112 5 5 — 

Physical Education 1 1 1 

Physical Science 101, 102 5 5 — 

ROTC 1 1 1 

18 18 18 
Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Agricultural Economics 222 4 — — 

Animal Husbandry 201 ; Dairy Husbandry 201 ; 

Horticulture 111; or Poultry Husbandry 211 — 3 3 

Economics 310, 312 — 5 5 

Humanities 201, 202 3 3 — 

Physical Education 1 1 1 

ROTC 2 2 2 

Social Science 3 3 3 

Technical Agriculture (other than 

Agricultural Economics) — — 6 

Zoology 101 4 — — 

17 17 20 



School of Agriculture 



67 



Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Agricultural Economics 3 4 3 

Business 201, 202, 203 5 5 5 

Economics 420 — — 5 

English 210 — 3 — 

Rural Sociology 331 3 — — 

Electives (Major Area) 3 — — 

Electives — 3 — 

18 15 17 
Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Agricultural Economics 448 — 3 — 

Business 302, 303, 403 3 3 3 

History 310 5 — — 

Political Science 211 5 — — 

Electives (Major Area) — 3 3 

Electives 3 6 6 

16 15 12 



AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE 
Freshman Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Chemistry 101, 102, 103 5 5 5 

English 101, 102, 103 5 5 5 

General Agriculture 101, 102, 103 1 1 1 

Mathematics 111, 112, 113 5 5 5 

Physical Education 1 1 1 

ROTC 1 1 1 

18 18 18 
Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Botany 101 — — 4 

Chemistry 221, 222 5 5 — 

English 210 — — 3 

Humanities 201, 202 3 3 — 

Physical Education 1 1 1 

ROTC 2 2 2 

Social Science 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

Zoology 101 — — 4 

Electives (Major Area) 3 6 6 

17 20 20 
Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Bacteriology 202 4 — — 

Chemistry 331 — — 5 

Economics 310 5 — — 

Mathematics 218 — 5 — 



68 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



Zoology 303 — 

Zoology 404 or Botany 202 — 

Electives (Major Area) 6 

Electives 3 

18 
Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Physics 201, 202 5 

Electives (Chemistry, Physics, 

or Mathematics) — 

Electives (Major Area) 4 

Electives (Bacteriology, Botany or Zoology) 4 

Electives — 

13 



6 
3 

19 



Winter 
5 



4 
3 

12 



3 
4 
6 
3 

16 



Spring 



15 



NOTE : Students in Agricultural Economics who pursue the curriculum in Agricultural 
Sciences should consult the chairman of Agricultural Economics Department for course 
requirements in the natural sciences. 



AGRICULTURAL TECHNOLOGY 
Freshman Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter 

Biological Science 101 — — 

Crop Science 111 — — 

English 101, 102, 103 5 5 

General Agriculture 101, 102, 103 1 1 

Mathematics 111, 112 5 5 

Physical Education 1 1 

Physical Science 101, 102 5 5 

ROTC 1 1 

18 18 

Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter 

Agricultural Economics 222 4 -— 

Agricultural Engineering 122 — 3 

Botany 101, Animal Husbandry 201 4 3 

English 210 — — 

Horticulture 111 — — 

Humanities 201, 202, 203 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Poultry Husbandry 211 3 — 

ROTC 2 2 

Social Science 101, 102; Economics 310 3 3 

Zoology 101; Social Science 223 — 4 

20 19 

Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter 

Bacteriology 202 — — 

Dairy Husbandry 201 ; Zoology 304 3 — 

Physics 111, 112 5 5 

Rural Sociology 331 — — 



Spring 
5 
3 
5 
1 



16 



Spring 



3 
3 
3 
1 

2 
3 

4 

21 



Spring 
4 
3 

3 



School of Agriculture 



Electives (Bacteriology, Botany or Zoology) 5 — 

Electives (Major Area)** 4 10 

Electives ** — 3 



17 18 16 

Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Electives (Major Area)** 9 9 6 

Electives ** 6 6 5 

15 15 11 

Agricultural Economics 332 4 

Agricultural Education 300. Audio-visual Aids in Vocational Agriculture 3 

Agricultural Education 303. The New Farmers of America 3 

Agricultural Education 441. Materials and Methods of 

Teaching Vocational Agriculture 5 

Agricultural Education 442. Observation and Directed Practice Teaching 5 
Agricultural Education 443. Problems in Teaching 

Vocational Agriculture 5 

Agricultural Engineering 111. Agricultural Drawing 3 

Agricultural Engineering 332. Farm Power 3 

Animal Husbandry 332. Livestock Feeding 5 

Animal Husbandry 344. Livestock Judging 3 

Education 201. Introduction to the Study of Education 3 

Education 301. Principles of Secondary Education 3 

Guidance 501. Introduction to Guidance 3 

Horticulture 233. Vegetable Production 3 

Horticulture 335. Plant Materials and Landscape Maintenance 3 

Poultry Husbandry 212. Poultry Husbandry 3 

Psychology 203. Adolescent Psychology 3 

Psychology 301. Educational Psychology 3 

Soil Science 332. Soil Fertility 3 

66 



** Students seeking a major in Agricultural Education must elect the following courses: 



70 The Agricultural and Technical College 

GENERAL COURSES FOR AGRICULTURE MAJORS 

GENERAL AGRICULTURE 
Undergraduate 

101. General Agriculture. Credit 1(1-0) 
A student of the broad base of modern agriculture with emphasis on 

current trends and opportunities in agriculture. 

102. General Agriculture. Credit 1(1-0) 
A continuation of General Agriculture 101 with special emphasis on the 

development of agriculture as a modern technology and the impact of 
science on its development. 

103. General Agriculture. Credit 1(1-0) 
A continuation of General Agriculture 102. A study of the agricultural 

economy and certain inter-relationships with the non-agricultural industries 
and business. 

211. Supervised Job Experience. Credit 9(0-45) 
Designed to provide students pursuing the two-year terminal curricula 

with an apprenticeship experience in the special vocation they plan to 
enter. Each student required to spend a minimum of twelve weeks working 
full time in an approved job situation. 

212. Supervised Job Experience. Credit 3(1-4) 
Registration concurrently with General Agriculture 211; assigned read- 
ing; record of observations and personal experiences; personal evaluation 
of own work, and reports. 



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
AND RURAL SOCIOLOGY 

Howard F. Robinson, Chairman 

The Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology offers 
courses in farm management, marketing, land economics, agricultural sta- 
tistics, agricultural prices, financing and credit arrangements, agricultural 
legislation, and rural sociology. 

Courses are designed to develop techniques for analyzing technical and 
social problems of agriculture to help prepare students for farming careers, 
and to lay a groundwork for those who wish to do graduate study. 

The Department assumes major responsibility for guidance and counselling 
of students who major in Agricultural Business. 

Employment opportunities: 

Federal and State governments employ many agricultural economists for 
domestic and foreign research and educational work. There is also a good 
possibility for employment with business organizations as salesmen, pur- 
chasing agents and marketing specialists. Opportunities for trained farm 
managers and farm operators are likely to increase as farming becomes 
more complex. 



School of Agriculture 71 

COURSES IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
Undergraduate 

222. Introduction to Agricultural Economics. Credit 4(4-0) 
(Formerly Ag. Econ. 122.) 

An application of the fundamental principles of economics to agricultural 
production, marketing, land tenure, leasing arrangements, financing and 
related economic problems. 

223. Elements of Farm Management. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Ag. Econ. 123.) 

Principles which govern the effective organization and operation of the 
farm firm. 

331. Marketing Agricultural Products. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ag. Econ. 131.) 
Principles and practices of marketing as applied to farm commodities. 
Form, place, time and possession utility, the ultimate consumer's market, 
the agricultural industries market, the middleman system, exchange market 
operation and future contracts, price determination, reducing marketing 
costs and Federal Legislation as it applies to agricultural marketing. Visits 
will be made to local markets. Prerequisite: Ag. Econ. 222. 

334. Agricultural Prices. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Ag. Econ. 505.) 
Information regarding agricultural price changes, index numbers, price 
determination, seasonal and cyclical price movements, storage problems, and 
other methods of controlling extreme price fluctuations, government price 
policy. 

407. Intermediate Economic Theory. Credit 3(3-0) 

Allocation of resources and distribution of income within various market 
structures, with emphasis on analytical tools. 

441. Farm Records and Accounts. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Ag. Econ. 141.) 
Methods and practices employed in taking farm inventories, filing income 
tax returns, receipts and expenditures, preparing financial statements. Single 
enterprise accounts and the use of farm accounts as a method of indicating 
the efficiency of farm operations. Prerequisite: Ag. Econ. 222. 

445. Land Economics. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Ag. Econ. 145.) 

Isolates land as a factor of production, historical implications of land 
policies in the United States, land classification, land utilization, rights in 
land and the extent of public land ownership. Prerequisite: Ag. Econ. 222. 

446. Land Income. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Ag. Econ. 146.) 

Historic and present theories of rent, the role of the landlord, principles 
of land evaluation, appraisal and taxation. Prerequisites: Ag. Econ. 222, 
445. 

447. Cooperative Marketing. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Ag. Econ. 147.) 

Early cooperative movements, principles of cooperatives, importance of 
cooperatives in the United States, problems of organization, management 
and operation of cooperative endeavors by farmers in buying and selling. 
Prerequisites: Ag. Econ. 222, 331. 



72 The Agricultural and Technical College 

448. Agricultural Legislation. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Ag. Econ. 148.) 

The relationship between agriculture and government since the North- 
west Ordinance of 1787 to the present; how this relationship has affected 
the farm business, price supports and other policy which has an impact 
upon agriculture. Prerequisite: Ag. Econ. 222. 

449. Marketing Dairy Products. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Ag. Econ. 149.) 

Economic problems in procuring milk and cream, in processing and dis- 
tributing fluid milk, cream and manufactured dairy products; marketing 
legislation, market news, market methods, including cooperation, consumer 
demand and price policy. Prerequisite: Ag. Econ. 331. 

451. Economics of Food Distribution. Credit 3(3-0) 

Description of market structures and operations in the processing, whole- 
sale and retail distribution of food. The effect of industrial organization and 
government regulations on the efficiency of the market and consumers de- 
mand for food. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

551. Southern Resources in a Changing Economy — A Seminar. 

Credit 3(3-0) 
Trends and the formulation of economic and social problems in the South, 
and particularly in North Carolina; labor and capital mobility, agriculture 
as compared with industry, the problem of underemployment, and important 
phases of current economic development. Prerequisites: Economics 310, 
Sociology 231 or Ag. Econ. 222. 

502. Agricultural Policy. Credit 3(3-0) 
The place of agriculture in a national and international economy; the 

impact of public policy on agriculture, an analysis of policy as it relates to 
the price support program, farm credit, international trade, aid to low 
income farmers, and resources development. 

503. Farm Cost Accounts. Credit 3(2-2) 
A study of records needed to determine the relative profitability of various 

agricultural enterprises, setting up and keeping running accounts of the 
farm business, interpretation and use of accounts in farm management. 

504. Commodity Marketing Problems. Credit 3(3-0) 
Economic problems arising out of the demand, supply and distribution of 

specific agricultural commodities; the price making mechanism, marketing 
methods, grades, values, price, cost, and governmental policy. Not more than 
two commodities will be studied in any one quarter. Selection of commodities 
and emphasis on problem areas will be made on the basis of current need; 
commodities studied will be cotton, tobacco, fruits and vegetables, and 
grains. Prerequisite: Ag. Econ. 331. 

506. Seminar in Marketing Farm Products. Credit 2(2-0) 

Discussion, reports, consultation and research efforts which throw light 
on marketing problems of low income farmers in North Carolina, including 
National and International importance of locally grown products such as 
tobacco and cotton. 

508. Special Problems in Agricultural Economics. Credit 3(3-0) 

Designed for students who desire to work out special problems in the field 
of agricultural economics; problem definition and formulation; developing 
thesis proposals. 



School of Agriculture 73 

509. Advanced Farm Management. Credit 3(2-2) 
Methods of research, plans, organization, and the application of principles 

as they relate to farm management. Part of the students' time will be spent 
on the college farm. 

510. Seminar in Agricultural Economics. Credit 2(2-0) 
Discussion reports and an appraisal of current literature on agricultural 

problems. Consent of instructor. 

511. Agricultural Economics Research. Credit 3(3-0) 
Review of different types of research methodology used in the field of 

Agricultural Economics. 

532. Agricultural and Social Statistics. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Ag. Econ. 132a.) 

Making use of census data, statistical methods, calculating machines used 
extensively. Prerequisites: Ag. Econ. 222, Econ. 310, or Soc. 231. 

533. Agricultural and Social Statistics. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Ag. Econ. 132b.) 

This course is a continuation of Ag. Econ. 532. 

542. Financing Agriculture. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ag. Econ. 142.) 
Risks and uncertainty as applied to agriculture, the role of agricultural 
credit in a money economy, classification of credit, principles underlying the 
economic use of farm credit, primary lending agencies in North Carolina, 
and the growth of Federal Lending agencies in the farm credit field. Pre- 
requisite: Ag. Econ. 222. 

COURSES IN RURAL SOCIOLOGY 

Undergraduate 

311. Principles of Rural Sociology. Credit 3(3-0) 

Social systems, cultural patterns and institutional arrangements of people 
in rural environments in relation to those of towns and cities. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

501. Rural Social Problems. Credit 3(3-0) 
Population, education, religion, health, land tenure, parity income, farm 

labor and mechanization, and housing. 

502. Rural Leadership. Credit 3(3-0) 

Opportunities and needs for rural leadership; educational and psychologi- 
cal requirements for various types of rural leaders. 

503. The Rural Family. Credit 3(3-0) 
The institutional nature of the rural family, etc., role in the community 

including its relations to educational, religious, welfare and other com- 
munity organizations. 

504. Community Organization. Credit 3(3-0) 
Planning and organizing educational, health, recreational and religious 

activities for rural people. 

505. Rural Standards of Living. Credit 3(3-0) 
Consumption behavior in the main community groups of our society. 

506. Special Problem in Rural Sociology. Credit 2 to 4 hours 
Work on a problem in rural sociology under the guidance of a member of 

the faculty. 



74 The Agricultural and Technical College 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

C. E. Dean, Chairman 



The Department of Agricultural Education offers professional courses 
to prepare persons for teaching vocational agriculture and related fields. 
The program has been designed to meet the certification requirements of 
vocational agriculture teachers in North Carolina. The Department offers 
courses leading to the Master of Science Degree in the field of Agricul- 
tural Education. 

COURSES IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

Undergraduate 

111. Orientation. Credit 1(1-0) 

Lectures and discussions designed to acquaint the student with the gen- 
eral field of agriculture. This course should acquaint him with many areas 
of the general field of agriculture, methods of studying, taking notes, and 
using the library. 

300. Audio-visual Aids in Vocational Agriculture. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Agricultural Education 500). 
Techniques in preparing, using and evaluating audio-visual aids. It also 
includes the operation and adjustment of such equipment as projectors, 
recorders, film strip machines, and other units found in departments of 
vocational agriculture. 

303. The New Farmers of America. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Agricultural Education 503). 
The practices and procedures of setting up local, district and state or- 
ganizations. Emphasis will be placed on training officers and members. 

337. Secondary Education in Agriculture. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Agricultural Education 137). 
The course is designed to acquaint the student with the historical ob- 
jectives of vocational agriculture, the problems in the area of secondary 
education and some solutions. 

401. Materials and Methods of Teaching Out-of-School Groups. 

Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Agricultural Education 501a.) 
Methods and materials used in teaching young farmers and adult groups. 
Course includes developing various teaching devices and aids for instruct- 
ing out-of-school groups. 

402. Teaching Out-of-School Groups. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Agricultural Education 501b.) 

Organizing, planning and teaching out-of-school groups, including work- 
ing with community committees and organizations and evaluating the out- 
come with such groups. Prerequisites: Agricultural Education 401 and 441. 

441. Materials and Methods of Teaching Vocational Agriculture. 

Credit 5(5-0) 
(Formerly Agricultural Education 141.) 
Principles of teaching as applied to vocational agriculture; preparing 
lesson plans, and organizing teaching aids to meet community needs. Pre- 
requisites: Education 202, 301, Guidance 501, Psychology 203, 301. 



School of Agriculture 75 

442. Observation and Directed Practice Teaching. Credit 5(5-0) 
(Formerly Agricultural Education 142.) 

Students will be required to spend eight weeks in an approved training 
center doing observation and directed practice teaching. Prerequisite: Ag- 
ricultural Education 441. 

443. Problems in Teaching Vocational Agriculture. Credit 5(5-0) 
(Formerly Agricultural Education 143.) 

The discovery and analysis of problems in the field, program building, 
and evaluation of instruction in vocational agriculture. Prerequisite: Agri- 
cultural Education 442. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

502. Adult Education in Vocational Agriculture. Credit 3(3-0) 
Principles and problems of setting up and directing adults with emphasis 

on conducting organizing instruction. 

503. Adult Education in Agricultural Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
The latest techniques and methods of teaching adults in agricultural 

education. 

504. The Principles of Agricultural Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
The principles and practices in agricultural education as revealed by 

research and new trends. 

505. Guidance and Group Instruction in Vocational Agriculture. 

Credit 3(3-0) 
Guidance and group instruction applied to agricultural occupations and 
other problems of students in vocational agriculture. 

506. Problem Teaching in Vocational Agriculture. Credit 3(3-0) 
Setting up problems for teaching unit courses in vocational agriculture. 

507. Public Relations in Vocational Agriculture. Credit 3(3-0) 
The means and methods of promoting and publicizing the local program 

of vocational agriculture. 

Graduate 

These courses are open only to graduate students. For descriptions of 
them see bulletin of the Graduate School. 

601. Administration and Supervision. Credit 3(3-0) 

602. Program Planning in Vocational Agriculture. Credit 3(3-0) 

603. History of Vocational Agriculture. Credit 3(3-0) 

605. Public Relations in Agriculture. Credit 3(3-0) 

606. Research in Vocational Agriculture. Credit 3(3-0) 

607. Philosophy of Vocational Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

608. Seminar in Agricultural Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

609. Methods and Techniques of Supervisors of Agricultural Education. 

Credit 3(3-0) 

610. Recent Developments and Trends in Agricultural Education. 

Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Agricultural Education 610a.) 

611. Recent Developments and Trends in Agricultural Education. 

Credit 3(3-0) 

612. Community Problems in Agriculture. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Agricultural Education 604a.) 



76 The Agricultural and Technical College 

DEPARTMENT OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY 

W. L. Kennedy, Chairman 

The Department of Animal Industry offers courses designed to meet 
the diverse interests of students by offering a choice of several options 
of study in which the students may specialize. Students wishing a major 
in Agricultural Sciences or Agricultural Technology may concentrate in 
either of the following fields of specialty: Animal Husbandry, Dairy Hus- 
bandry, Dairy Manufacturing, or Poultry Husbandry. 

The specialized options of the students are particularly well suited 
to equip them as owners and managers of general farms where livestock 
is handled, for specialized types of dairy and poultry farming, and as 
instructors and investigators in Animal Industry. 

A two-year course in Animal Industry is offered for those students who 
desire a terminal program. 

COURSES IN ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Undergraduate 

201. Breeds of Livestock. Credit 3(3-2) 

(Formerly A. H. 111.) 
Breeds of farm animals with reference to their origin and development. 

222. Types and Market Classes of Livestock. Credit 3(3-2) 

(Formerly A. H. 122.) 
The economic importance, classification and grading of cattle, sheep, 
swine, horses, and livestock products. 

224. Swine Production. Credit 3(3-2) 

(Formerly A. H. 124.) 
The place of swine in the farm program; their selection, breeding, care 
and management. 

331. Physiology of Domestic Animals. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly A. H. 131.) 

Designed to acquaint students with structure and function of tissues, 
organs and systems of animals. 

332. Livestock Feeding. Credit 5(5-0) 
(Formerly A. H. 132.) 

Principles of feeding and the composition of feeds. 

334. Animal Breeding. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly A. H. 134.) 
A study of the principles of genetics as applied to the improvement of 
farm animals, and some of the methods and problems of the breeder. 

336. Sheep Production. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly A. H. 136.) 
The place of sheep in the farm program; their selection, breeding, care, 
and management. 



School of Agriculture 77 

337. Livestock Marketing. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly A. H. 137.) 
A study of the development of livestock markets, methods of marketing 
and seasonal trends will be considered. Field trips will be made to local 
livestock markets and slaughtering plants. 

344. Livestock Judging. Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly A. H. 144.) 
Special training in points of selection of farm animals. 

433. Diseases of Farm Animals. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly A. H. 133.) 

The common diseases of livestock with reference to causes, prevention, 
and treatment. 

435. Beef Production. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly A. H. 135.) 
Breeds of beef cattle, their selection, care, and management. 

442. Farm Meats. Credit 4(2-4) 

(Formerly A. H. 142.) 
Meat production from a market standpoint with laboratory work in the 
slaughtering, curing, and marketing of meat products. Special training 
in points of selection of farm animals. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

501. Animal Nutrition. Credit 5(5-0) 

Metabolism of carbohydrates, fats, proteins and minerals; net energy 
values and application to new theories of feeding. 

502. Seminar. Credit 1(1-0) 
A review of current literature related to Animal Husbandry. 

503. Seminar. Credit 1(1-0) 
A continuation of Animal Husbandry 502. 

504. Special Problems. Credit 3(3-0) 
Formerly A. H. 503.) 

Special assignments in the advanced phases of any of the lines of animal 
production and meats. Students will elect work in desired subjects after 
conference with the instructor in charge. Prerequisite: Three courses in 
Animal Husbandry. 

513. Advanced Livestock Management. Credit 3(3-0) 
Special work in problems dealing with feeding, breeding, and manage- 
ment in the production of beef cattle. 

514. Advanced Livestock Management. Credit 3(3-0) 
A continuation of Animal Husbandry 513 with emphasis on sheep. 

515. Advanced Livestock Management. Credit 3(3-0) 
A continuation of Animal Husbandry 514 with emphasis on swine. 

Graduate 

These courses are open only to graduate students. For descriptions of 
them see bulletin of the Graduate School. 

607. Meat Selection. Credit 3(3-0) 

(For Home Economics Teachers and Home Demonstration Agents.) 



78 The Agricultural and Technical College 

618. Meat Production. Credit 3(3-0) 

619. Advanced Livestock Marketing. Credit 3(3-0) 

620. Sheep Production and Management. Credit 3(3-0) 

COURSES IN DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Undergraduate 

201. Principles of Dairying. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly D. H. 111.) 
The fundamental principles of dairying; type in dairy cattle; the com- 
position of milk, its chemical and physical properties; sampling and test- 
ing of milk; selection and herd management. 

222. Dairy Technology. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly D. H. 122.) 

The composition of milk and milk products; study of the Babcock test 
for fat in milk and cream and use of modified Babcock test for fat in 
other dairy products. Prerequisite: Dairying 201. 

223. Dairy and Food Plant Sanitation. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly D. H. 123.) 

Principles and procedures, sanitary standards and regulations for milk 
and food products; equipment cleaning and detergents used for an effec- 
tive job. 

246. Dairy Plant Practice. Credit 3(0-6) 

(Formerly D. H. 146.) 
Assigned practice work at the college dairy and the mlik and ice cream 
laboratories of the college dairy plant; given for both dairy manufactur- 
ing and dairy husbandry majors. Prerequisite: Three dairy subjects. 

330. Dairy Plant Management. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly D. H. 130.) 
The organization and management of a dairy plant; procurement of 
raw supplies; plant layout, equipment for plants, distribution of products, 
costs and operation, and record keeping. 

334. Dairy Cattle and Milk Production. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly D. H. 134.) 
Breeds of dairy cattle, their development, care, and management. 

340. Dairy Products Judging. Credit 2(0-4) 

(Formerly D. H. 140.) 
Standards and grades of dairy products; practice in judging milk, cream, 
butter, and ice cream. 

342. Market Milk. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly D. H. 142.) 

The Market Milk industry, milk ordinances, city milk supply, transpor- 
tation, grading, pasteurizing, bottling, and distribution. Prerequisite: 
Dairying 201, 222. 

343. Advanced Dairy Technology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly D. H. 143.) 

Theory of and practice in analytical methods used for control in dairy 
manufacturing plant. Prerequisite: Dairying 342. 



School op Agriculture 79 

344. Ice Cream Making. Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly D. H. 144.) 

The principles involved in the manufacturing of commercial ice cream 
and ices. 

441. Dairy Management. Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly D. H. 141.) 
Designs and construction of dairy buildings; problems of economical 
milk production; fitting and showing dairy cattle. 

447. Dairy Breeds and Pedigrees. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly D. H. 147.) 

A study of dairy pedigrees and breed families; official testing and dairy 
herd improvement, and association method. 

448. Dairy Cattle Judging. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly D. H. 148.) 

Characteristics of the dairy breeds and score-card requirements; rela- 
tion of type, form and function to the value of selection. Practice judging. 
Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

501. Dairy Seminar. Credit 1(1-0) 
Assignment of papers on subjects relating to the dairy industry and 

methods in preparing and presenting such papers. 

502. Dairy Seminar. Credit 1(1-0) 
Continuation of D. H. 501. 

504. Special Problems. Credit 3(3-0) 

Assignment of work along special lines in which a student may be in- 
terested, given largely by the project method for individuals either in 
Dairy Manufacturing or Dairy Husbandry. Prerequisite: Three dairy 
subjects. 

Graduate 

This course is open only to graduate students. For description of it, 
see bulletin of the Graduate School. 

610. Advanced Dairy Farm Management. Credit 3(3-0) 



COURSES IN POULTRY HUSBANDRY 
Undergraduate 

211. Poultry Husbandry. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly P. H. 111.) 

The industry; origin and classification of breeds, selection, improvement 
and management of laying and breeding flocks. 

212. Poultry Husbandry. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly P. H. 112.) 

Incubation; brooding, housing, feeding, and management of young grow- 
ing stock. 

221. Poultry Plant Practice. Credit 9(0-18) 

(Formerly P. H. 121.) 
A laboratory course designed to develop and improve practical skills in 
poultry management and production. 



80 The Agricultural and Technical College 

222. Incubation and Hatchery Management. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly P. H. 122.) 

A study of the operation incubators and managements of commercial 
hatcheries including sanitation, egg sources, hatchability, records and the 
National Poultry Improvement Plan. Prerequisite: Zoology 402. 

323. Turkey Management. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly P. H. 123.) 
History, origin, development and management of the turkey flock. Pre- 
requisite: Poultry Husbandry 212. 

331. Poultry Judging. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly P. H. 131.) 

Standard and utility judging of fowls, selection and preparation for shows 
and organization and supervision of poultry shows, judging and laying 
contests. Prerequisite: Poultry Husbandry 212. 

332. Poultry Nutrition and Feeding. Credit 4(3-2) 
(Formerly P. H. 132. , 

Nutritive requirements and metabolism of poultry; feed ingredients, com- 
pounding rations and feeding standards for breeding, fattening, growing 
and producing stock. 

334. Poultry Anatomy-Physiology. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly P. H. 134.) 
A course which deals with the structure and function of tissues, organs 
and systems of the domestic fowl. Prerequisite: Poultry Husbandry 212. 

441. Poultry Diseases and Parasites. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly P. H. 141.) 

Poultry hygiene; causes of diseases; symptoms and control of diseases 
and parasiste. Prerequisite: Poultry Husbandry 334. 

442. Poultry Farm Management. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly P. H. 142.) 

Principles of farm management as applied to poultry production; records 
and factors influencing economic returns. Prerequisite: Poultry Husbandry 
212. 

443. Processing and Marketing Poultry Products. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly P. H. 143.) 

Methods of killing, dressing, grading and storage of poultry meats and 
the grading and storage of eggs; transportation poultry products and fac- 
tors influencing price. Prerequisite: Poultry Husbandry 212. 

444. Poultry Breeding. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly P. H. 144.) 

Inheritance of certain significant morphological and physiological char- 
acters in the fowl; systems of mating, breeding patterns, trap nesting, 
pedigrees and artificial insemination. Prerequisite: Zoology 303. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

501. Poultry Seminar. Credit 1(1-0) 
Special articles and reports on subjects relating to the poultry industry 

will be assigned each student with round table discussion. 

502. Poultry Nutrition. Credit 3(2-2) 
Techniques for determining the nutritive requirement of poultry and the 

biological analysis of feedstuffs for poultry. 



School of Agriculture 81 

503. Marketing Poultry Products. Credit 3(2-2) 
Function of marketing agencies and relation to marketing costs. Types 

and location of markets with respect to production. Function of storage, 
market reporting, and marketing controls. 

504. Poultry Plant Management. Credit 3(2-2) 
Consideration involved in establishing a poultry enterprise. Economics 

and management factors involved in the operation of specialized poultry 
breeding, egg, and meat farms. 

Graduate 

This course is open only to graduate students for description of it see 
the bulletin of the Graduate School. 
601. Poultry Research. Credit 3 to 5(0-6-10) 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

Artis P. Graves, Chairman 



The program of the Biology Department is designed to serve the needs 
of the college as a whole in the area of the biological sciences. The under- 
graduate courses of instruction are organized to provide training necessary 
for specialization in agricultural sciences, home economics, nursing, horti- 
culture, and the teaching of Biology. The Department offers courses de- 
signed to meet the general education requirement of the college and a pro- 
fessional program for entrance into graduate, medical, dental and veteri- 
nary schools. A Master of Science degree with concentration in Biology is 
also offered by the Biology Department. 

A student may earn the Bachelor of Science degree in Biology by pur- 
suing either of the two curricula offered by the department. The profes- 
sional major is designed to meet the needs of students planning a vocation 
in industry, dentistry, medicine, veterinary medicine, or further graduate 
studies. The teaching major is designed for Biology majors who desire to 
meet the requirements for certification as secondary school teachers. 

The curricula of the two programs are similarly structured in the fresh- 
man and sophomore years and the biological credit hour requirements of 
the programs are identical. Each, however, is geared toward its specific goal. 

A graduate student may earn the Master of Science degree with concen- 
tration in Biology by pursuing the thesis or the non-thesis program as de- 
scribed in the graduate college program. 

Professional Major. The professional major requires the student to com- 
plete a minimum of 48 quarter hours in the major field consisting of the 
following courses: Botany 101, 102; Microbiology 202; Zoology 101, 102, 
201, 301, 302, 303, 306, 402, 404. The professional major is further required 
to complete the following courses in related sciences and other areas: 
Chemistry 101, 102, 103, 221, 222, 223; Physics 201, 202, 203; Mathematics 
111, 112, 113; English 101, 102, 103, 201, 210; Education 101, 201, 202; 
French or German 101, 102, 103; Humanities 201, 202, 203; Psychology 



82 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



201; Social Science 101, 102, 103; Physical Education, 6 hours; Air or 
Military Science, 9 hours; and 12 hours of free electives. 

Teaching Major. This program requires a minimum of 48 quarter hours 
in Biology. These credits must include the following courses: Botany 101, 
102; Microbiology 202; Zoology 101, 102, 201, 301, 303, 304, 305, 402, 404. 
Related science requirements consists of: Chemistry 101, 102, 103, 221; 
Physics 201, 202. Teacher certification requirements consist of the following 
courses: Psychology 203, 301; Education 201, 202, 301, 311, 402, 501. Other 
requirements include Education 101; English 101, 102, 103, 201, 210; French 
or German 101, 102, 103; Humanities 201, 202, 203; Mathematics 111, 112, 
113; Psychology 201; Physical Education, 6 hours; Social Science 101, 102, 
103; and 9 hours of Air or Military Science. 

A minimum of 32 quarter hours in Biology is required of students who 
minor in Biology. The minor consists of the following courses, or their 
equivalent: Botany 101, 102; Zoology 101, 102, 201, 301, 302, 402. 

It is suggested that persons planning to apply for admission to medical 
schools should pursue a major in Biology, or a major in Chemistry and 
a minor in Biology. 



Suggested Program for Biological Science Majors* 

PROFESSIONAL MAJOR CURRICULUM 

Freshman Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Air or Military Science 101, 102, 103 1 1 1 

Education 101 — — 

English 101, 102, 103 5 5 5 

Mathematics 111, 112, 113 5 5 5 

Physical Education 101, 103, 131 (Men) ... 1 1 1 

Physical Education 102, 104, 106 (Women) . . 1 1 1 

Social Science 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

Zoology 101, 102, Botany 101 or 

Botany 101, 102, Zoology 101 4 4 4 

19 19 19 

Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Air or Military Science 201, 202, 203 2 2 2 

Botany 102, Zoology 201, Bact. 202 or 

Zoology 102, Zoology 201, Bact. 202 4 4 4 

Chemistry 101, 102, 103 5 5 5 

English 201, 210 3 — — 

Humanities 201, 202, 203 3 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 1 

Psychology 201 — 5 — 

18 20 18 
Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Education 201, 202 3 3 — 

Chemistry 221, 222, 223 5 5 5 



School of Agriculture 



83 



French or German 101, 102, 103 5 

Zoology 301, 302, 303 4 

Electives — 

17 
Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Physics 201, 202, 203 5 

Zoology 306, 402, 404 4 

Electives 3 

12 



17 



Winter 

5 

4 
3 

12 



5 

4 
3 

17 



Spring 

5 

4 



12 



TEACHING CURRICULUM 
Freshman Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Air or Military Science 101, 102, 103 1 

Education 101 

English 101, 102, 103 5 

Mathematics 111, 112, 113 5 

Physical Education 101, 103, 131 (Men) ... 1 

Physical Education 102, 104, 106 (Women) . . 1 

Social Science 101, 102, 103 3 

Zoology 101, 102, Botany 101 or 

Botany 101, 102, Zoology 101 4 

19 
Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Air or Military Science 201, 202, 203 2 

Botany 102, Zoology 201, Bact. 202 or 

Zoology 102, Zoology 201, Bact. 202 4 

Chemistry 101, 102, 103 5 

English 201, 210 3 

Humanities 201, 202, 203 3 

Physical Education 1 

Psychology 201 — 

18 

Junior Year 

Education 201, 202, Guidance 501 3 

Chemistry 221 5 

French or German 101, 102, 103 5 

Psychology 203, 301 — 

Zoology 301, 303, 304 4 

Zoology 305 — 

17 



Winter 


Spring 


1 


1 


5 


5 


5 


5 


1 


1 


1 


1 


3 


3 


4 


4 


19 


19 


Winter 


Spring 


2 


2 


4 


4 


5 


5 


— 


3 


3 


3 


1 


1 


5 


— 



20 



5 
3 

4 
4 

19 



18 



15 



* The3e programs are effective for persons enrolling after September 1, 1962. 



84 The Agricultural and Technical College 

Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Education 301, 311, 402 3 5 10 

Physics 201, 202 5 5 — 

Zoology 402, 404 4 4 — 

12 14 10 



COURSE IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 

Undergraduate 

101. Biological Science. Credit 5(4-2) 

This is a general education course that stresses the objectives presented 
under the general education program of the School of Education and Gen- 
eral Studies. It is structured to meet the needs of students who plan to teach 
(a) at the pre-school level, (b) at the elementary school level, (c) at the 
secondary level in a non-science mathematics area, and (d) in the area of 
music. In addition, this course is designed for freshmen who plan to con- 
centrate in the divisions of the Humanities or the Social Sciences. 



COURSES IN BACTERIOLOGY 
Undergraduate 

201. Microbiology. Credit 5(3-4) 
(Formerly Bacteriology 112.) 

A survey of the principles and techniques of microbiology and immu- 
nology with special emphasis on their application to nursing. 

202. General Microbiology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly General Bacteriology 123.) 

A general course designed to orient the student within the world of 
microscopic living things, including yeasts, molds, bacteria, and rickettsiae. 
Viruses are also considered. Detailed study will be given to bacteria as the 
prototypes of all microorganisms. Relationships among microorganisms and 
selected microorganisms are emphasized; a prerequisite to all other course 
in bacteriology above the sophomore level. 

301. Food Bacteriology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Bacteriology 134.) 

A study of the role of microorganisms in the preparation, preservation, 
and decomposition of various food products. Some consideration is given to 
the Public Health problem regarding the spread of some diseases from con- 
taminated foods. 

302. Dairy Bacteriology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Bacteriology 144.) 

A general course which considers some of the common organisms asso- 
ciated with normal, and abnormal fermentations of milk; the role of micro- 
organisms in the production and decomposition of various dairy products 
is also considered. 

303. Soil Bacteriology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Bacteriology 145.) 

The role of microorganisms in soil fertility. Special emphasis is on the 
activity of the nitrogen-fixing bacteria and also those concerned in the de- 
composition of organic waste materials. 



School of Agriculture 85 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

501. Principles and Practices of Immunology. Credit 3(3-0) 

In this course the fundamental mechanism of immunological reactions and 
their theoretical foundations will be studied. Selected lectures will deal with 
antigenic and chemical composition of certain microorganisms and methods 
of laboratory practice, including some clinical applications. Prerequisite: 
Bacteriology 202. 

COURSES IN BOTANY 
Undergraduate 

101. General Botany. Credit 5(3-4) 
(Formerly Botany 111.) 

Plants as living organisms constituting an integrated part of man's en- 
vironments; general plant structure, general classification, evolutionary 
tendencies and living processes. 

102. General Botany. Credit 4(2-4) 
Flowering plants as living organisms constituting an integrated part of 

man's environment, general plant structure, cells, tissues, organs, and living 
processes; general classification; heredity in plants and evolutionary ten- 
dencies. 

201. Plant Taxonomy. Credit 5(3-4) 
(Formerly Botany 112.) 

The systematic organization of the plant kingdom; emphasis on identi- 
fication and classification of important plant genera and families. 

202. Plant Physiology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Botany 202.) 

An analysis of complex living processes occurring in plants and an at- 
tempt to explain them in terms of chemistry and physics. 

301. Plant Pathology. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Botany 133.) 
Basic factors governing the development of plant diseases including 
host-parasite relationships, effect of environment on disease development 
and the nature of disease resistance. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

504. Special Problems in Botany. Credit 3(3-0) 
Open to advanced students in botany for investigation of specific problems. 

505. Plant Biology. Credit 3(3-1) 
A presentation of fundamental botanical concepts to broaden the back- 
ground of high school biology teachers. Bacteria, fungi, and other micro- 
scopic plants will be considered as well as certain higher forms of plants. 
This course will consist of lectures, demonstrations, projects, and field trips. 

Graduate 

These courses are open only to graduate students. For descriptions of 
them, see the bulletin of the Graduate School. 

611. Essentials of Plant Anatomy. Credit 4(3-2) 
Prerequisite: Botany 505 or equivalent. 

612. Applied Plant Ecology. Credit 4(3-2) 
Prerequisite: Botany 505, 611 or equivalent. 



86 The Agricultural and Technical College 

COURSE IN GENERAL SCIENCE 

506. General Science for Elementary Teachers. Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will consider some of the fundamental principles of the life 
and physical sciences in an integrated manner in the light of present society 
needs. 

COURSES IN ZOOLOGY 

Undergraduate 

101. General Invertebrate Zoology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Zoology 111.) 

A general concept of the basic principles of Zoology and a brief survey of 
the animal kingdom. Various areas of animal biology are studied, including 
cellular organizations, classification, morphology, and physiology of repre- 
sentative forms from the protozoa through the phylum arthropoda. 

102. General Zoology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Zoology 112.) 

The continuation of Zoology 102 which gives the more fundamental train- 
ing required for Biological Science Majors. Consideration is given to repre- 
sentative members of Mollusca, Echinodermata and Chordata, with more 
detailed emphasis on organ systems of frog, foetal pig and man. 

201. Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Zoology 123.) 

A comparative study of chordate organ systems with rather detailed 
emphasis on the primitive vertebrates, dogfish shark and the turtle. Pre- 
requisite: Zoology 102. 

202. Advanced Invertebrate Zoology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Zoology 122.) 

Comprehensive consideration of the morphology, function, phylogeny, 
classification and the life histories of representative forms of lower and 
higher invertebrate groups exclusive of insects. Prerequisites: Zoology 101, 
102. 

203. Human Anatomy and Physiology. Credit 5(3-4) 
(Formerly Zoology 121.) 

A study of the general structure and function of the organ systems of 
man. The laboratory work shall consist of the dissection of the foetal pig 
and a study of the human skeleton. Required of Home Economics majors. 
Prerequisite: Zoology 102. 

301. Mammalian Anatomy. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Zoology 124.) 

Lectures and detailed laboratory dissections on the cat, dog, or foetal 
sheep and other related mammals as the basis for an understanding of 
human anatomy. Prerequisite: Zoology 201. 

302. Histology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Zoology 132.) 

An intensive study of the cell and cellular organization of the tissue and 
organs of various animals. Prerequisite: Zoology 102 or its equivalent. 

303. Principles of Genetics. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Zoology 142.) 

An introductory experimental course treating with elementary principles 
of genetics and their operation, significance in plants, animals, and human 
populations. Prerequisites: Zoology 101, 102 or equivalent. 



School of Agriculture 87 

304. General Entomology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Zoology 134.) 

Elementary structure, description, and habits of the principal orders of 
insects. Laboratory work will consist of collecting, mounting, preserving, 
and classification of principal insect representatives. Recommended for 
general science and biological science majors. Prerequisite: Zoology 101. 

305. Economics Entomology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Zoology 133.) 

Elementary structure, life histories, classification, and control of insect 
pests and related arthropods. Recommended for students majoring in one of 
the agricultural sciences. Prerequisite: Zoology 101. 

306. General Microtechnique. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Zoology 505.) 

Designed to develop skills in the preparation of cells, tissues and organs 
for microscopic observation and study. Prerequisites: Zoology 101, 102 or 
equivalent. 

401. Human Physiology. Credit 5(5-0) 
(Formerly Zoology 141a.) 

Lectures and laboratory demonstrations of certain organ activity of com- 
mon laboratory animals. This introductory course correlates these physio- 
logical principles with the performance of the integrated organ systems of 
the human. Prerequisite: Zoology 307. 

402. Vertebrate Embryology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Zoology 143.) 

Study of the developmental stages of selected vertebrates. The materials 
are treated comparatively and consist of amphibian, bird, rodent, and refer- 
ences to mammalian forms. Prerequisite: Zoology 201 or special consent 
of instructor. 

403. Vertebrate Embryology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Zoology 144.) 

Stresses variations in rodent and mammalian development and applica- 
tions of experimental embryological procedures. Prerequisite: Zoology 402. 

404. General Physiology. Credit 4(2-2) 
A treatment of the fundamental physiological processes of living systems. 

Laboratory work involves selected experiments on physiology of movement, 
respiration, blood and circulation, digestion, excretion and nervous trans- 
mission. Prerequisites: Zoology 101, 102 and one year of General Chemistry. 

405. Human Physiology. Credit 5(3-4) 
(Formerly Zoology 141b.) 

Lectures and laboratory exercises on certain organ activity of common 
laboratory animals. This introductory course correlates these physiological 
principles with the performance of the integrated organ systems of the 
human. Required of majors in the School of Nursing. Prerequisite: Zoology 
307. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

501. Special Problems in Zoology. Credit £(3-0) 
Open to students qualified to do research in Zoology. 

502. Mammalian Biology. Credit 3(3-0) 
Study of the evolutionary history, classification, adaptation and variation 

of representative mammals with special emphasis on the prenatal variations 
in prototherian, metatherian and eutherian types. Prerequisites: Zoology 
101 and Botany 101. 



88 The Agricultural and Technical College 

503. Biology of Sex. Credit 3(3-0) 
Lectures on the origin and development of the germ cells and reproduc- 
tive systems in selected animal forms. Prerequisites: Zoology 101, 102 or 
equivalent. 

504. Cytology. Credit 3(3-0) 
Study of the cell with lectures and periodic student reports on modern 

advances in cellular biology. Prerequisite: Zoology 302 or special consent 
of instructor. 

506. Nature Study. Credit 3(3-0) 
A study of diversified organisms, their habits, life histories, defenses, sex 

relationships, periodic activities and economic values designed to acquaint 
the student with fundamental knowledge that should lead to a fuller appre- 
ciation of nature. 

507. Experimental Embryology. Credit 3(3-0) 
A comprehensive lecture-seminar course covering the literature of ex- 
perimental embryology and development physiology. Experimental studies 
treating with amphibian, chick and rodent development are designed as 
laboratory projects. Prerequisite: Zoology 402, 403 or equivalent. 

508. Animal Biology. Credit 3(3-0) 
A lecture-demonstration course stressing fundamental concepts and prin- 
ciples of biology with the aim of strengthening the background of high 
school teachers. Emphasis is placed on the principles of animal origin, 
structure, function, development, and ecological relationships. 

Graduate 

These courses are open only to graduate students. For descriptions of 
them, see the bulletin of the Graduate School. 

601. Projects in Biology. Credit 2(0-4) 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

602. Seminar in Biology. Credit 1(1-0) 

611. Applied Invertebrate Zoology. Credit 4(3-2) 
Prerequisite: Zoology 508 or equivalent. 

612. Fundamentals of Vertebrate Morphology. Credit 4(3-2) 
Prerequisite: Zoology 508 or equivalent. 

613. Basic Protozoology. Credit 4(3-2) 
Prerequisite: Zoology 508. 

614. Introductory Experimental Zoology. Credit 4(2-2) 
Prerequisite: Zoology 612 or equivalent. 

615. Invertebrate Biology for Elementary and 

Secondary School Teachers. Credit 3(3-0) 



School of Agriculture 89 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

Gerald A. Edwards, Chairman 

The Department of Chemistry offers two major curricula leading to the 
Bachelor of Science degree. The curriculum of the professional major is 
designed to meet the needs of students planning either to begin profes- 
sional careers in chemistry upon graduation, or to engage in further study 
in the field at the graduate level. The teaching major is designed to give 
the student a thorough foundation in chemistry while meeting the require- 
ments for certification as a teacher at the secondary school level. This 
curriculum differs from the customary teaching major in that it also pro- 
vides sufficient training to allow the student to do bonafide work at the 
graduate level in chemistry, as well as in education. 

The two curricula are identical in the freshman and sophomore years. 
The student, therefore, need not reach a final decision regarding his choice 
of a profession until the beginning of his third year. 

Professional Major. This program requires that the student complete 70* 
quarter hours in chemistry consisting of the following courses: 101, 102, 103, 
108, 221, 222, 223, 301, 302, 331, 332, 401, 402, 431, 441 442 443 and five 
quarter hours in advanced chemistry courses, including 403. Other require- 
ments of chemistry majors are the following: Mathematics 111, 112, 113, 
221, 222, 223; English 101, 102, 103, and five quarter hours of literature; 
German 101, 102, 103, 205; Physics 201, 202, 203; Botany 101; Zoology 101; 
Education 101; 15 quarter hours of social science (History 210, 310; and 
Economics 310 are recommended) ; and six quarter hours of physical educa- 
tion. While the College does not require a minor for graduation, the above 
requirements in mathematics are equivalent to a minor in that area. For 
graduation, a student must maintain a grade point average of 2.0 or more 
in his major field. 

Teaching Major. The teaching major requires a minimum of 56* quarter 
hours credit in chemistry including Chemistry 101, 102, 103, 108, 221, 222, 
223, 331, 332, 441, 442, 443. Other requirements include Mathematics 111, 
112, 113, 221, 222, 223; Physics 201, 202, 203; Botany 101, Zoology 101; 
German 101, 102, 103; Psychology 201, 203, 301, 302; Education 201, 202, 
301, 311, 402; English 101, 102, 103 and five quarter hours of literature; 
Geography 310; and six quarter hours of physical education. The mathe- 
matics requirements of this curriculum are equivalent to a minor. Students 
may elect about 10 quarter hours in other courses of their choice without 
exceeding the normal load. Persons completing this major sequence may be 
certified as chemistry, mathematics, or science (biology, chemistry, physics, 
or general science) teachers. A grade point average of 2.5 is required in 
chemistry courses in order to enroll in this curriculum. 

Minor. A minor in chemistry requires a minimum of 35-40* quarter hours, 
consisting of the following courses: 101, 102, 103, 221, 222, 223, 331, 332. 



* Students transferring into the Department after the freshman year may omit Chem- 
istry 108. 



90 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



Suggested Programs for Chemistry Majors 
PROFESSIONAL MAJOR CURRICULUM 

Freshman Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter 

Chemistry 101, 102, 103 5 5 

Chemistry 108 — 1 

Education 101 — 

English 101, 102, 103 5 5 

Mathematics 111, 112, 113 5 5 

Military or Air Science 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

17 18 
Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter 

Chemistry 221, 222, 223 5 5 

German 101, 102, 103 5 5 

Mathematics 221, 222, 223 5 5 

Military or Air Science 2 2 

Physical Education 1 1 

18 18 
Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter 

Botany 101, Zoology 101 — 5 

Chemistry 301, 302 — 1 

Chemistry 331, 332, 441 5 5 

English 330 or 321 5 — 

German 205 3 — 

Physics 201, 202, 203 5 5 

Electives — 3 

18 19 

Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter 

Chemistry 401, 402 1 1 

Chemistry 442, 443, 431 5 5 

Chemistry Electives 2-5 2-5 

Economics 310 — — 

History 210, 310 5 5 

Electives 3-5 3-5 

15 to 21 16 to 21 



Spring 
5 



17 



Spring 

5 
5 
5 
2 
1 



18 



Spring 

4 
1 
5 



5 
3 

18 
Spring 



5 

2-5 
5 

3-5 

16 to 20 



School of Agriculture 



91 



TEACHING MAJOR CURRICULUM 

The Freshman and Sophomore years of the curriculum for those enrolled 
in the teaching major are identical with those for students enrolled in the 
professional major curriculum. 

Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Botany 101 — — 5 

Education 201, 202 3 3 — 

Chemistry 331, 332, 441 5 5 5 

Psychology 201, 203, 304 5 3 3 

Psychology 301 — 3 — 

Physics 201, 202, 203 5 5 5 

18 19 18 

Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Chemistry 442, 443 5 5 — 

Education 301 — — 3 

Education 311, 402 — 5 10 

English 330 or 321 5 — — 

Geography 310 5 — — 

Zoology 101 — 4 — 

Electives 3-5 3-5 — 

18-20 17-19 13 



COURSES IN CHEMISTRY 



101. General Chemistry. 

(Formerly 111.) 
Introduction, elements, compounds 
calculations. 



102. 



Undergraduate 

Credit 5(3-4) 

atomic structure, bonding, gases, and 



Credit 5(3-4) 



General Chemistry. 

(Formerly 112.) 
Solids, liquids, solutions, electrolytes, oxidation-reduction and the halo- 
gens. Prerequisite: Chemistry 101. 



103. 



Credit 5(3-6) 



General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis. 

(Formerly 113.) 
A continuation of general chemistry including an introduction to qualita- 
tive inorganic analysis. Prerequisite: Chemistry 102. 

104. General Chemistry. Credit 5(3-4) 
A continuation of Chemistry 102 with an emphasis on organic chemistry. 

This course is recommended as a terminal course for non-science majors. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 102. 

105. General Chemistry for Nurses. Credit 5(3-4) 
(Formerly 107.) 

Introduction to techniques and concepts in chemistry necessary for nurs- 
ing students; includes writing and interpretation of symbols, formulas, 
equations; atomic structure; composition and reactions of matter. 



92 The Agricultural and Technical College 

106. General Chemistry for Nurses. Credit 5(3-4) 
(Formerly 108.) 

A continuation of Chemistry 105; includes an introduction to organic 
chemistry. 

107. General Chemistry for Nurses. Credit 5(3-4) 
(Formerly 109.) 

A continuation of Chemistry 106; includes a study of the chemical changes 
taking place during life processes. 

108. Chemistry Orientation. Credit 1(1-0) 
(Formerly 115.) 

A series of weekly lectures and discussions on the nature and require- 
ments of the chemical profession; the application of chemistry to modern 
living; and other selected topics. 

221. Organic Chemistry. Credit 5(3-6) 
(Formerly 131.) 

Aliphatic compounds and their derivatives. Prerequisite: Chemistry 103 
or 104. 

222. Organic Chemistry. Credit 5(3-6) 
(Formerly 132.) 

Complex aliphatic compounds, introduction to aromatic compounds and 
their derivatives. Prerequisite: Chemistry 221. 

223. Organic Chemistry. Credit 5(3-4) 
(Formerly 133.) 

Complex aromatic compounds and the systematic identification of organic 
compounds. Prerequisite: Chemistry 222. 

301, 302. Current Trends in Chemistry. Credit 1(1-0) each 

(Formerly 139a,b.) 
A series of bi-weekly lectures and discussions on special problems in 
chemistry and of the chemical profession not covered in formal courses. 
The course will include introduction to the chemical literature. 

331. Quantitative Analysis I. Credit 5(2-6) 
(Formerly 122.) 

Volumetric analysis including theory and calculations associated with 
acid-base equilibria, oxidation-reduction, and precipitation-complexation 
titrimetric methods. Prerequisite: Chemistry 103. 

332. Quantitative Analysis II. Credit 5(2-6) 
(Formerly 123.) 

Continuation of Chemistry 331. This course also includes theory and cal- 
culations associated with gravimetric determinations and electro-deposition 
measurements. Prerequisite: Chemistry 331. 

401, 402. Current Trends in Chemistry. Credit 1(1-0) each 

(Formerly 140a,b.) 
A continuation of Chemistry 302, with increased student participation. 
Work will include a seminar in which students enrolled in Chemistry 403 
will report progress in their research problems. 

403. Introduction to Chemical Research. Credit 3(0-6) 

(Formerly 145.) 

Makes use of the laboratory and library facilities in studying minor 
problems of research. Prerequisite: Advanced standing and permission of 
department. May be taken for credit during more than one quarter. 



School op Agriculture 93 

431. Quantitative Analysis III. Credit 5(2-9) 

An introduction to elementary instrumental chemical analysis including 
theory and calculations associated with colorimetric, spectrophotometric 
and electroanalytical measurements. Prerequisite: One year of Physical 
Chemistry. 

441. Physical Chemistry. Credit 5(3-4) 
(Formerly 141.) 

Atomic and nuclear structure, gaseous and crystalline states, physical 
properties and molecular structure, and the laws of Thermodynamics. Pre- 
requisites: Physics 202. Math. 223, Chemistry 332, and Physics 203, con- 
currently. 

442. Physical Chemistry. Credit 5(3-4) 
(Formerly 142.) 

Studies of the liquid state, solutions, chemical equilibria, and phase dia- 
grams. Prerequisite: Chemistry 441. 

443. Physical Chemistry. Credit 5(3-4) 
(Formerly 143.) 

A study of Chemical Kinetics, electric conductance, ionic equilibria, and 
colloids. Prerequisite: Chemistry 442. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

501. Inorganic Chemistry. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 511.) 

A lecture course covering selected topics in Inorganic Chemistry; designed 
for science teachers having a limited background in Chemistry. Prerequisite; 
Chemistry 103. Not accepted for credit toward a degree in Chemistry. 

502. Organic Chemistry. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 512.) 

A lecture course covering selected topics in Organic Chemistry; designed 
for science teachers with a limited background in chemistry. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 103. Not accepted for credit toward a degree in Chemistry. 

503. Advanced General Chemistry. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 513.) 

A lecture course in which the laws and concepts of chemistry are pre- 
sented with greater depth and clarity than in customary general chemistry 
courses. 

504. Recent Advances in Chemistry. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 514.) 

A lecture-demonstration course in which recent occurrences in the major 
branches of chemistry and chemical education are presented. The course 
includes a series of student seminars resulting from library research on 
topics considered in the class. 

510. Inorganic Synthesis. Credit 1-3(0-2 to 6) 
(Formerly 153.) 

Discussion of theoretical principles of synthesis and development of ma- 
nipulative skills. Prerequisites: One year of Organic and two quarters of 

Quantitative Analysis. 

511, 512. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. Credit 3(3-0) each quarter 

(Formerly 151, 152 or 551, 552.) 
A sequence course in the theoretical approach to the systematization of 
inorganic chemistry. Prerequisite: One quarter of Physical Chemistry, prior 
or concurrent. 



94 The Agricultural and Technical College 

524. Qualitative Organic Chemistry. Credit 5(3-4) 

A course in the systematic identification of organic compounds. Pre- 
requisite: One year of Organic Chemistry. 

531. Instrumental Methods of Analysis. Credit 5(2-6) 

A study of the theory and the operational features of some of the more 
important instruments that are currently being used as analytical tools such 
as U.V., visible-light, and infrared spectrophotometers, electroanalytical 
instruments, thermometric titrators, fluorimeters, etc. 

541. Radiochemistry. Credit 5(3-4) 

(Formerly 155 or 555.) 
A study of the fundamental concepts, processes, and applications of 
nuclear chemistry, including natural and artificial radioactivity, sources, and 
chemistry of the radioelements. Open to advanced majors and others with 
sufficient background in chemistry and physics. Prerequisites: Chemistry 
441 or Physics 380. 

542. Radioisotope Techniques and Applications. Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly 156 or 556.) 
The techniques of measuring and handling radioisotopes and their use in 
chemistry, biology, and other fields. Open to majors and non-majors. Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 103 or 104. 

551. General Biochemistry. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 148.) 

A lecture course describing the chemical composition, reactions, and 
metabolic significance of lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins, hormones, 
enzymes, minerals and water. Prerequisite: Chemistry 223 and 332. 

552. Laboratory in General Biochemistry. Credit 2(0-4) 

(Formerly 148.) 
A laboratory course devoted to qualitative detection, quantitative estima- 
tion, and metabolic reactions of lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins, 
hormones, enzymes, minerals and water. Prerequisites: Chemistry 331 and 
credit or concurrent registration in Chemistry 551. 

553. Laboratory in Practical Biochemistry. Credit 2(0-4) 
A laboratory course in biochemistry for non-science majors dealing with 

more practical applications of the subject. Prerequisite: Chemistry 223. 

Graduate 

These courses are open only to graduate students. For descriptions of 
them, see the bulletin of the Graduate School. 

601. Seminar. Credit 1(1-0) 
(Formerly 645.) 

602. Chemical Research. Credit 2-6(0-4 to 12) 
(Formerly 646.) 

611. Structural Inorganic Chemistry. Credit 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 512. 

615. Special Problems in Inorganic Chemistry. Credit 2-5(1-2 to 8) 

616. Selected Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. Credit 3(3-0) 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 512 or permission of the instructor. 

621. Elements of Organic Chemistry. Credit 5(4-1) 



School of Agriculture 95 

622, 623. Advanced Organic Chemistry. Credit 3(3-0) each quarter 

Prerequisite: One year of Organic Chemistry. 

624. Organic Reactions. Credit 3(3-0) 
Prerequisite: Two quarters of Advanced Organic Chemistry. 

625. Special Problems in Organic Chemistry. Credit 2 to 5(1-2 to 8) 

626. Selected Topics in Organic Chemistry. Credit 3(3-0) 

627. Organic Preparations. Credit 1 to 3 (0-2 to 6). 
Prerequisite: One year of Organic Chemistry. 

631. Modern Analytical Chemistry. Credit 5(4-1) 
(Formerly 611.) 

632, 633. Advanced Analytical Chemistry. Credit 3(3-0) each quarter 
Prerequisite: One year of Analytical Chemistry. 

634. Electrometric Measurements. Credit 3(1-4) 
Prerequisites: One year of Analytical Chemistry or permission of the 

Chemistry Department. 

635. Special Problems in Analytical Chemistry. Credit 2 to 5(1-2 to 8) 

636. Selected Topics in Analytical Chemistry. Credit 3(3-0) 

641, 642. Principles of Physical Chemistry. Credit 10(8-6) 

(Formerly 631.) 

643. Chemical Thermodynamics. Credit 3(3-0) 
Prerequisite: Two quarters of Physical Chemistry. 

644. Chemical Spectroscopy. Credit 4(3-2) 
Prerequisite: One year of Physical Chemistry. 

645. Special Problems in Physical Chemistry. Credit 2 to 5(1-2 to 8) 

646. Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry. Credit 3(3-0) 

647. Electrochemistry. Credit 3(3-0) 
Prerequisite: One year of Physical Chemistry. 

648. Colloid Chemistry. Credit 3(3-0) 
Prerequisite: One year of Physical Chemistry. 

655. Special Problems in Biochemistry. Credit 2 to 5(1-2 to 8) 

656. Selected Topics in Biochemistry. Credit 3(3-0) 

COURSES IN PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

Undergraduate 

101, 102. The Physical Universe. Credit 5(4-2) each 

(Formerly 220, 230.) 

An integrated treatment of astronomy, chemistry, geology ("earth sci- 
ence"), and physics. Laboratories are devoted to demonstrations and student 
experiments and questions. 



96 The Agricultural and Technical College 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

501. Seminar in Physical Science for Elementary 

School Teachers. Credit 3(0-6) 

Preparation, presentation, and demonstration of subject matter for ele- 
mentary school science. This course provides opportunity for full discussion 
and for student participation. Prerequisite: Minimum of three years teach- 
ing experience in upper elementary grades. 

DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Mrs. Clara V. Evans, Chairman 

The curricular requirements of the Department of Home Economics have 
been selected to provide a background for the development of competencies 
and values which will: 

1. Make possible satisfying personal, group, and family relationships 
as a basis for active participation in a democratic society; 

2. Lead to the enrichment of home and family living through the ap- 
preciation and use of art and advances in science and technology; 

3. Develop understanding and appreciation of varying cultural back- 
grounds ; 

4. Prepare the individual for gainful employment in one of the major 
areas of the profession. 

CORE REQUIREMENTS 

The core requirements consist of courses which must be taken by all 
students who are enrolled in the Home Economics Department. 

The departmental core has been designed to enrich the basic prepara- 
tion of all home economics majors by focusing course content on the 
needs of students in adjusting as individuals and as family members 
to changes occurring in a democratic society. 

The interdepartmental core is composed of courses from other dis- 
ciplines which will provide a broad educational background by fur- 
nishing basic information in the physical, biological, social and be- 
havioral sciences, the humanities, and the communicaton skills. 

HOME ECONOMICS CORE 

Freshman-Sophomore Years 

Course and No. Title Credit Hrs. 

H. Ec. 100 Introduction to Home Economics 2 

C. T. R. A. 101 Clothing for the Family 4 

F. & N. 101 Family Foods 4 

H. Ec. 101 The Individual and His Family 3 

H. Ec. 201 Contemporary Housing 4 

Junior-Senior Years 

Personal and Family Finance 3 H. Ec. 301 

Marriage and Family Relations 3 H. Ec. 302 

TOTAL QUARTER HOURS 23 



School of Agriculture 97 

INTERDEPARTMENTAL CORE 

Freshman-Sophomore Years 

Art 217 Beginning Design 3 

Chem. 102, 102 General Chemistry 10 

Chem. 103 *Gen. Chem. and Qualitative Analysis 5 

or General Chemistry 

Chem. 104 Freshman Composition I, II, III 15 

Eng. 101, 102, 103 An Introduction to the Humanities 3 

Humanities 201 College Algebra 5 

Math. Ill Principles of Physics I 5 

Physics 111 General Psychology 5 

Psy. 201 World Civilization and Culture 3 

Soc. Sc. 101 Man and His Social Institutions 3 

Soc. Sc. 102 Contemporary Social, Economic 

Soc. Sc. 103 and Political Problems 3 

Junior-Senior Year 

Ec. 310 
Principles of Economics 5 

TOTAL QUARTER HOURS 65 

TOTAL CORE REQUIREMENTS 88 

Men who are enrolled in Home Economics should consult with their ad- 
visers in meeting the College requirement for two years of Air or Military 
Science. 

Home Economics courses are not restricted to majors in the Department. 
All core courses may be elected by any student of the college. Admission 
to major courses will be approved if permission is granted by the instructor 
of the course. 

MAJOR AREAS IN THE DEPARTMENT 

The department offers the Bachelor of Science degree with majors in 
the following areas: (1) Clothing, Textiles and Related Art; (2) Foods and 
Nutrition; (3) Institution Management; (4) Home Economics Education; 
and (5) Nursery School and Kindergarten Education. 

A student is eligible for graduation upon the completion of all major 
course requirements with electives to make 200 hours and a grade point 
average of 2.00. 

For information concerning the graduation requirements for each of 
the five areas consult the listings for the desired major under Cur- 
riculum Requirements by Major Areas. 

CLOTHING, TEXTILES AND RELATED ART 

This major leads to professional opportunities for men and women in 
clothing, textiles, fashions and interior design. 

Students majoring in clothing, textiles, and related art who are interested 



* To be taken by majors in Foods and Nutrition, and may be elected by Institution 
Management majors taking the therapeutic option. 



98 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



in men's or women's wear, fashions, textiles or interior design should con- 
sult their academic adviser beginning with the junior year and plan a 
program according to their interests. All seniors must enroll in C.T.R.A. 
402, 501, 503 and 505. 

Suggested Program for Clothing, Textiles and Related Art Major 
Freshman Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Art 217 or 111 3 — — 

C.T.R.A. 101, 205, 206 or 207 — 7 3 

English 101, 102, 103 5 5 5 

Home Economics 100, 101, 102 2 — 6 

Mathematics 111 5 — — 

Physical Education 1 1 1 

Social Science 102, 103 — 3 3 

16 16 18 

Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Art 217 or 111 3 — — 

Chemistry 101, 102, 103 5 5 5 

C.T.R.A. 201, 202, 204 5 5 5 

Foods and Nutrition 101 — 4 — 

Home Economics 201, 204 — 4 3 

Humanities 201 3 — — 

Physical Education 1 1 1 

Psychology 201 — — 5 

Social Science 101 3 — — 

20 19 19 

Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

C.T.R.A. 203, 304 and Clothing Electives ... 10 10-12 10-12 

Economics 310 5 — — 

Home Economics 301, 302 — 3 3 

Physics 111 — — 5 

Zoology 102, 203 4 4 — 

19 17-19 18-20 

Senior Year 

Arranged with major advisers. 

FOODS AND NUTRITION 

The major in foods and nutrition is designed to provide a strong scientific 
background which may be used to interpret and use creatively a knowledge 
of foods and nutrition in positions as clinical nutritionists, assistant tech- 
nicians in food testing and research, and in preparation for graduate study. 
Study on the graduate level leads to opportunities as nutrition specialists, 
food specialists in journalism, radio, and television, public health nutri- 
tionists, food technologists, college teachers, and research technicians in 
foods and nutrition. 



School of Agriculture 



99 



Suggested Program for Foods and Nutrition Major 
Freshman Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter 

Chemistry 101, 102, 103 5 5 

English 101, 102, 103 5 5 

Foods and Nutrition 101 — 4 

Home Economics Ed. 100, 101 2 — 

Mathematics 111, 112, 113 5 5 

Physical Education 1 1 

18 20 
Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter 

Bacteriology 202 — — 

Chemistry 221, 222, 223 5 5 

Foods and Nutrition 201, 202, 203 5 5 

Humanities 201 3 — 

Physical Education 1 1 

Social Science 102, 103 — 3 

18 19 
Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter 

Art 217 3 

Chemistry 331, 332, 551 & 552 . . . . 5 5 

C.T.R.A. 101 — 4 

Economics 301 — — 

Foods and Nutrition 205, 302 — 5 

Home Economics 201, 301, 302 4 3 

Psychology 201 5 — 

Social Science 101 3 — 

20 17 
Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter 

Education 204 3 — 

English 210 — 3 

Foods and Nutrition 301, 504 — 3 

Foods and Nutrition 501, 502, 503 3 2 

Home Economics 306 or Elective — 5 

Home Economics 401 5 — 

Physics 111 5 — 

Electives 3 3-5 

19 16-18 



Spring 

5 
5 

3 
5 
1 

19 



Spring 

4 
5 
5 

1 
3 

18 



Spring 



18 



Spring 



5-8 
15-1 



HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

The four-year curriculum in Home Economics Education is designed to 
prepare graduates for positions as (1) high school homemaking teachers, 
or (2) county home economics agents. 



100 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



Three options are possible for the Winter and Spring Quarters of the 
senior year. 

Option I — for students who desire to meet the State requirements for 
certification as a high school teacher. 

Option II — for students who desire to meet the requirements of the Co- 
operative Extension Service as home economics county 
agents. 

Option III — for students who desire to qualify as a teacher and county 
agent. 

The selection of electives should be made in consultation with the stu- 
dent's adviser. 

Suggested Programs for Home Economics Education Majors 

Freshman Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Chemistry 101, 102, 103 or 104 5 5 5 

English 101, 102, 103 5 5 5 

Foods and Nutrition 101 — 4 — 

Home Economics 100, 101 2 — 3 

Mathematics 111 5 — — 

Physical Education 1 1 1 

Social Science 102, 103 — 3 3 

18 18 17 
Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Art 217 3 — — 

Bacteriology 202 — — 4 

C.T.R.A. 101 — 4 — 

Education 201 — — 3 

Foods and Nutrition 201, 202, 203 5 5 5 

Home Economics 201 — 4 — 

Humanities 201 3 — — 

Physical Education 1 1 1 

Psychology 201 — — 5 

Social Science 101 3 — — 

Zoology 102, 203 4 5 — 

19 19 18 
Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

C.T.R.A. 201, 202, 204 5 5 5 

Economics 310 5 — — 

Education 202 — 3 — 

Guidance 501 — — 3 

Home Economics 202 5 — — 

Home Economics 204, 301, 302 3 3 3 

Home Economics 303 — — 3 

Physics 111 — 5 — 

Psychology 203, 301 — 3 3 

18 19 17 



School of Agriculture 



101 



Senior Year 












Winter 


Winter 


Course and No. 


Fall 


or 


or 






Spring 


Spring 


Art 111 


3 


— 





Education 312 


5 








Home Economics 306 or elective 


5 








Home Economics 401 


5 








OPTION I 








Education 301, 312 





13 





Home Economics 306 or elective 


— 





5 


Electives 


— 


— 


10-15 




15-20 


OPTION II 








Education 313 





3 





Home Economics 306 or elective 


— 





5 


Home Economics 402 


— 


10 





Electives 


— 


— 


10-15 








15-20 


OPTION III 








Education 301, 312 


— 


13 





Education 313 


— 


— 


3 


Home Economics 402 


10 




18 


13 


13 



INSTITUTION MANAGEMENT 

The Institution Management program is designed to meet the academic 
requirements of The American Dietetic Association. Graduates are eligible 
for internships in institutions that have received approval from the Asso- 
ciation. 

Institution Management offers excellent professional opportunities for 
men and women who are interested in the service of food for large groups 
of people. Two options are offered: 

1. OPTION A — for students interested in Therapeutic or Administrative 
Dietetics in a hospital or clinic. It prepares the graduate for a Clinical 
Internship or graduate study. 

2. OPTION B — for students interested in Food Service Administration in 
hospitals, business, industry or educational institutions. Selection of 
this option qualifies the graduate for (1) employment in assistant 
supervisory positions in food businesses or industrial plant cafeterias, 
(2) the operation of private businesses, (3) approved Food Service 
Administration Internships, or (4) graduate study in hotel or food 
administration. 



102 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



Suggested Programs for Institution Management Majors 

OPTION A AND B 

Freshman Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Chemistry 101, 102, 103 or 104 5 5 5 

English 101, 102, 103 5 5 5 

Foods and Nutrition 101 — 4 — 

Home Economics 100, 101 2 — 3 

Mathematics 111 5 — — 

Physical Education 1 1 1 

Social Science 102, 103 — 3 3 

18 18 17 

OPTION A 
Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Bacteriology 202 — — 4 

Chemistry 221, 222, 223 5 5 5 

C.T.R.A. 101 — 4 — 

Foods and Nutrition 201, 202, 203 5 5 5 

Institution Management 201 — — 3 

Physical Education 1 1 1 

Social Science 101 3 — — 

Zoology 102, 203 4 5 — 

18 20 18 
Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Accounting 201, 202 3 3 — 

Art 217 3 — — 

Chemistry 551 and 553 — — 5 

Economics 310 — — 5 

Foods and Nutrition 205, 302 — 5 5 

Humanities 201 3 — — 

Institution Management 301, 302, 303 10 5 — 

Psychology 201, 304 — 5 3 

19 18 18 
Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Foods and Nutrition 504 — — 5 

Home Economics 201, 301, 302 — 7 3 

Institution Management 401, 501, 502, 503 . 13 6 — 

Physics 111 — 5 — 

Psychology 403 — — 5 

Electives — 0-2 3-7 

13 18-20 16-20 



School of Agriculture 



103 



OPTION B 
Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Accounting 201, 202, 203 3 

Bacteriology 202 — 

C.T.R.A. 101 — 

Foods and Nutrition 201, 202, 203 5 

Humanities 201 3 

Institution Management 201 — 

Physical Education 1 

Social Science 101 3 

Zoology 102, 203 4 

19 
Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Accounting 301, 302, 303 3 

Art 217 3 

Business Administration 302, 305 3 

Economics 310 — 

Institution Management 301, 302, 303, 304 10 

Physics 111 — 

Psychology 201 — 

Elective — 

19 
Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Business Administration 409 — 

Home Economics 301, 302 — 

Institution Management 401 & 501, 502 & 503 13 
Electives — 

13 



Winter 


Spring 


3 


3 


— 


4 


5 


— 


5 


5 





3 


1 


1 


5 


— 


19 


16 


Winter 


Spring 


3 


3 





3 


5 


— 


5 


5 


— 


5 


5 


— 


— 


3 


18 


19 


Winter 


Spring 





3 


3 


3 


6 


— 


5-10 


10-1 



14-19 



16-2 



NURSERY SCHOOL AND KINDERGARTEN EDUCATION 

This program is designed to provide a broad educational background to 
serve as a basis for an intensive study of the developmental phases of 
children during their first five years. 

The curricular requirements listed below assist the student in understand- 
ing early childhood and provide an opportunity for the application of edu- 
cational and psychological principles to the planning and execution of pro- 
grams for nursery school and kindergarten teaching. There is a great 
demand for qualified personnel to guide the development of children during 
these early years. 

Graduates with a major in Nursery School and Kindergarten Education 
qualify (1) to become directors of or teachers in nursery schools, kinder- 
gartens, or day care centers, and (2) for admission to graduate study in 
preparation to become college teachers, clinical psychologists, teachers of 



104 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



exceptional children, or directors of collegiate nursery schools or kinder- 
gartens. 

Suggested Program in Nursery School and Kindergarten Education Major 
Freshman Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Chemistry 101, 102, 103 or 104 5 5 5 

C.T.R.A. 101 or F&N 101 — 4 — 

English 101, 102, 103 5 5 5 

Home Economics 100, 101 2 — 3 

Mathematics 111 5 — — 

Physical Education 1 1 1 

Social Science 102, 103 — 3 3 

18 18 17 
Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Art 217 3 

C.T.R.A. 101 or F&N i6i ............. . . — 4 — 

Education 201 — — 3 

Foods and Nutrition 204 — — 3 

Home Economics 202, 203 5 3 — 

Humanities 201 3 — — 

Music 100 — — 1 

N.S. & K. Ed. 201, 202, 203 — 3 6 

Physical Education 1 1 1 

Psychology 201 — — 5 

Social Science 101 3 — — 

Zoology 102, 203 4 5 — 

19 16 19 
Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Art 111, 112 3 3 — 

Education 202, 203, 204 3 3 3 

Economics 310 5 — — 

English 210, 211 — 3 3 

Home Economics 201 — 4 — 

Home Economics 301, 302 — 3 3 

N.S. & K. Ed. 301, 302 6 — — 

Psychology 301, 304 — — 8 

17 16 17 
Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

N.S. & K. Ed. 401, 402A or 402B 5 5 5 

N.S. & K. Ed. 501, 503 — 3 1 

Physics 111 5 — — 

Psychology 404 4 — — 

Special Education 501, 502 3 3 — 

Electives 0-3 4-9 10-14 

17-20 15-20 16-20 



School of Agriculture 105 

COURSES IN CLOTHING, TEXTILES AND RELATED ART 

Undergraduate 

101. Clothing for the Family. Credit 4(3-3) 

A study of the individual clothing needs of family members; wardrobe 
planning; socio-economic and psychological aspects of clothing; buying 
principles, procedures and practices. 

201. Textiles. Credit 5(3-4) 
(Formerly Clothing. 112.) 

Textile fibers, their sources, characteristics and production into fabric, the 
social, economic and hygenic aspects and care of clothing. 

202. Elementary Clothing Construction. Credit 5(2-6) 
(Formerly Clothing 113.) 

Fundamental principles of clothing construction based on the use of the 
commercial pattern. 

203. Pattern Study. Credit 5(1-8) 
(Formerly Clothing 114 and 132.) 

A study of commercial patterns and probable variations in their design 
for garment construction. Partial drafting of a foundation garment from 
which an individual flat pattern is made. Prerequisite: Clothing 202. 

204. Advanced Clothing Construction. Credit 5(3-4) 
(Formerly Clothing 122.) 

A consideration of the clothing needs of family members with laboratory 
experiences to meet individual needs. 

205. Historic Costume. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Clothing 131.) 

The history of costume and its adaptation to our modern dress. 

206. Costume Art. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly Clothing 136.) 

Application of art principles to the development of original designs in 
clothing and accessories. Prerequisites: Clothing 205 and Art 217, 111. 

207. Introduction to Workroom Techniques. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Clothing 111.) 

A study of the fundamental skills in the selection, care, and use of power 
machines, and the development of basic workroom techniques in the con- 
struction of simple garments. 

208. Elementary Construction. Credit 5(2-6) 
(Formerly Clothing 115.) 

A continuation of Clothing 207 with emphasis on the construction of more 
advanced garments. 

301. Intermediate Construction. Credit 5(2-6) 
(Formerly Clothing 116.) 

A continuation of Clothing 208 with variation in the fabrics and styles of 
garments constructed. 

302. Drafting and Pattern Making. Credit 5(2-6) 
(Formerly Clothing 128 and 129.) 

A study of the fundamentals of pattern making through the drafting 
of flat patterns to individual specifications. 



106 The Agricultural and Technical College 

303. Advanced Construction. Credit 5(1-8) 
(Formerly Clothing 138 and 139.) 

The use of workroom techniques in custom tailoring using patterns drafted 
to individual specifications. 

304. Alterations and Re-styling. Credit 3(1-4) 
A study of the techniques involved in: (1) altering ready-to-wear gar- 
ments and (2) re-styling of outmoded garments to meet present day fashion. 

305. Draping. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly Clothing 133.) 

Construction of dress forms to duplicate the student's figure; creating 
original garments by draping on the dress form and the human figure. Pre- 
requisite: Clothing 206 or consent of instructor. 

306. Millinery. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly Clothing 134.) 

An introduction to the use of various millinery equipment and materials. 

307. Home Furnishings Laboratory. Credit 5(2-6) 
(Formerly Clothing 127.) 

Laboratory experience in the making of slipcovers, draperies, and other 
fabric furnishings. Prerequisite: H. Ec. 305. 

308. Tailoring for Women. Credit 5(3-4) 
(Formerly Clothing 137.) 

A study of the principles of custom tailoring as they apply to women's 
coats and suits. Laboratory experiences in the construction of women's coats 
and suits. Prerequisite: Clothing 204. 

401. Advanced Millinery. Credit 5(1-8) 
Design and execution of more difficult millinery problems. Prerequisite: 

Clothing 306. 

402. Workroom Techniques in Clothing, 

Textiles or Related Art. Credit 10(5-10) 

A course designed to give the student practical experiences in one of the 
areas of clothing, textiles or related art. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

501. Special Problems in Clothing. Credit 3-5 hours 
(Formerly Clothing 140.) 

Independent study on special problems in clothing, textiles or related 
art. (May be taken any quarter). 

502. Fashion Coordination. Credit 3(3-0) 
A study of the factors which influence the fashion world; trends, de- 
signers, centers and promotion. Field trips to fashion centers. 

503. Seminar in Clothing, Textiles and Related Art. Credit 1(1-0) 
A study of current trends in the field of Clothing, Textiles, and Related 

Art. 

504. Economics of Clothing and Textiles. Credit 3(3-0) 
A study of the economic aspects of clothing and household textiles as they 

relate to family needs and resources in their quest for maximum satisfac- 
tion and serviceability. 

505. Advanced Textiles. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Clothing 123.) 

A study of the physical and chemical properties of textile fibers and 
fabrics with emphasis on recent scientific and technological developments. 



School of Agriculture 107 

COURSES IN FOODS AND NUTRITION 

Undergraduate 

101. Family Foods. Credit 4(3-3) 

Principles of food preparation and nutrition; laboratory experiences in 
the selection, preparation, and serving of food to meet the nutritional needs 
of the family; role of diet in the maintenance of health and well being. 

201. Nutrition and Dietetics. Credit 5(3-4) 
(Formerly F&N 123.) 

The application of the scientific principles of nutrition to the planning of 
diets for various age groups. Prerequisites: Chem. 103, 104 or 109. 

202. Food Preparation. Credit 5(3-6) 
(Formerly F&N 125.) 

The application of scientific principles to food preparation and preserva- 
tion. Prerequisites: Chem. 103 or 104. 

203. Meal Planning and Table Service. Credit 5(2-6) 
(Formerly F&N 127.) 

Planning of meals with consideration of the economic and nutritional 
needs of all family members. Laboratory experiences provide opportunity 
to develop skill in the use and judgment of the more recent food products 
and equipment as time, money, and energy-saving measures. 

204. Child Nutrition. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly F&N 128.) 

A study of the principles of nutrition and their application to the feeding 
of children in family and nursery school groups. 

205. Diet Therapy. Credit 5(3-4) 
(Formerly F&N 129.) 

A study of dietary modifications necessary in the treatment of pathologic 
conditions. Prerequisite: F&N 201. 

301. Nutrition Education. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly F&N 131.) 

A course designed to assist in the development of nutrition education 
programs in the school and community. 

302. Experimental Cookery. Credit 5(2-6) 

(Formerly F&N 132.) 
A study of the chemical and physical composition and behavior of foods. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

501. Special Problems in Foods and Nutrition. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly F&N 140.) 

Individualized work on special problems in foods and nutrition. 

502. Recent Developments in Foods and Nutrition. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly F&N 130.) 

A study of recent research in foods and nutrition through discussion of 
reports in current scientific journals. 

503. Seminar in Foods and Nutrition. Credit 1(1-0) 
History of foods and nutrition; past and present theories and methods; 

specialists in their contributions; guest lecturers. (May be taken more than 
one quarter). 



108 The Agricultural and Technical College 

504. Advanced Nutrition. Credit 4(4-0) 

Advanced discussion of the roles of vitamins, minerals, protein, fat, and 
carbohydrate in the body and their interrelationships. Prerequisites: F&N 
201. Chem. 551 and 552 or concurrent. 

COURSES IN HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 
Undergraduate 

100. Introduction to Home Economics. Credit 2(2-0) 
A course designed to assist students in making personal adjustments to 

college living; an introduction to the broad areas of home economics; a 
study of the home economics curricula and professional opportunities in 
the field. 

101. The Individual and His Family. Credit 3(3-0) 
A study of the interrelationships of the individual and his family through- 
out the life cycle, with emphasis on health as it is related to the well-being 
of the family. 

102. Social Usage. Credit 2(2-0) 
A course intended for the person who desires to enrich living with 

graciousness and accepted standards in our present day society. 

201. Contemporary Housing. Credit 4(3-2) 
Consideration of the present day housing needs of the family laboratory 

experiences in the selection, use, and care of furnishings and equipment. 

202. Child Development. Credit 5(5-0) 
(Formerly C. D. 133.) 

A comprehensive study of the physical, social, emotional, personality and 
language development of the child from birth through early childhood. 

203. Child Development. Credit 3(3-0) 
Continuation of Home Economics 202 with emphasis on the periods of 

middle childhood through adolescence. Field trips and observations of in- 
dividual children. 

204. Housing. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly H. A. 134.) 

Designed to acquaint the student with factors involved in home owner- 
ship. Class discussions of the legal aspects, financing, regulations governing 
ownership, site selection, and interpretation of blueprints. Field trips and 
guest lecturers. 

301. Personal and Family Finance. Credit 3(3-0) 
Basic principles involved in managing personal and family finance with 

emphasis on buying and consumption practices. Prerequisite: Ec. 310. 

302. Marriage and Family Relations. Credit 3(3-0) 
A study of the interpersonal relationships in contemporary family life; 

emphasis on the changing nature of family adjustments, goals, values, and 
roles. 

303. Household Equipment. Credit 3(1-4) 
The application of principles and techniques relating to selection, care, 

and use of household equipment. 

304. Interior Design. Credit 3(2-2) 
A study of residential interiors with emphasis on color, design, style, 

furniture, lighting and accessories. 



School of Agriculture 109 

305. Home Furnishings. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Clothing 127.) 

A study of the selection, arrangement and care of home furnishings. 

306. Home Management Residence. Credit 5(3-6) 
(Formerly H. A. 143.) 

Designed to give students experiences in applying the principles of man- 
agement and interpersonal relations to group living.* 

401. Demonstration Techniques. Credit 5(2-6) 
(Formerly H. Ec. Ed. 141.) 

The application of the principles of demonstration techniques to all phases 
of home economics. 

402. Field Experience in Cooperative Extension Service. Credit 10(5-10) 
(Formerly H. Ec. Ed. 154.) 

Experience in off-campus centers under the supervision of county Home 
Economics Agents. Prerequisite: Ed. 313. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

501. Special Problems in Home Economics. Credit 3(3-0) 

Problems in the various areas of Home Economics may be chosen for 
individual study. 

503. Seminar in Home Economics. Credit 1(1-0) 

Consideration of problems resulting from the impact of social change on 
the various fields of Home Economics. (May be taken any quarter). 

COURSES IN INSTITUTION MANAGEMENT 

Undergraduate 

201. Institution Organization and Management. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly I. M. 123.) 
A study of the organization, management and administration of food 
service establishments. 

301. Institution Purchasing. Credit 5(4-3) 
(Formerly I. M. 125.) 

A study of the problems involved in the purchase of food and other ex- 
pendable supplies for food service establishments. 

302. Institution Equipment. Credit 5(4-3) 
A study of the selection, care and use of equipment for quantity food 

preparation and service. Interpretation of blueprints and specifications 
will be considered. 

303. Quantity Cookery. Credit 5(2-8) 
(Formerly I. M. 121.) 

The application of the principles of cookery to the preparation and serv- 
ice of food for group feeding. Prerequisite: F&N 202. 

304. Advanced Quantity Cookery. Credit 5(3-6) 
(Formerly I. M. 122.) 

Further experiences in the preparation of food with emphasis on menu 
planning, work schedules, cost and portion control for the varying types of 
food establishments. 



110 The Agricultural and Technical College 

305. School Lunch. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly I. M. 129.) 

A study of the organization and administration of school lunch programs. 

306. Catering. Credit 5(3-6) 
(Formerly I. M. 127.) 

Designed to improve skill and technique in the preparation of specialty 
dishes and in planning, preparing and serving for entertainments. Con- 
sideration will be given to the foreign influence on gourmet cookery. Pre- 
requisite: F&N 202 or consent of instructor. 

401. Field Experience in Institution Management. Credit 10(5-10) 

Individualized experiences in off-campus food service establishments. (May 
be taken in the summer quarter). 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

501. Special Problems in Institution Management. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly I. M. 140.) 

Individual work on special problems in institution management. 

502. Readings in Institution Management. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly I. M. 142.) 

A study of institution management through reports and discussion of 
articles in current trade periodicals and scientific journals. 

503. Seminar in Institution Management. Credit 1(1-0) 
Discussion of problems involved in the organization and management of 

specialized food service areas. 

COURSES IN NURSERY SCHOOL AND KINDERGARTEN EDUCATION 
Undergraduate 

201. Introduction to Nursery School and 

Kindergarten Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

Historical background and present-day philosophies of early childhood 
education. Relationships of children, teachers, parents and students. Visits 
in schools and observation of individual children. 

202. Play and Play Materials for the Young Child. Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly N. Sch. Ed. 131.) 
Discussion of the importance of play in all aspects of child development. 
Experiences in developing creative art. Prerequisite: H. Ec. 202. 

203. Literature for the Young Child. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly N. Sch. Ed. 132.) 

A survey of prose and poetry for young children; criteria for the selec- 
tion and age placement of stories. Experiences in creating original stories 
for young children are provided. 

301. Music in the Nursery School and Kindergarten. Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly N. Sch. Ed. 133.) 
Acquisition of an initial repertoire of children's tunes; listening to songs 
and records for the young child and experiences for developing skill with 
the auto-harp and piano. Prerequisite: Music Theory 100. 



School of Agriculture 111 

302. Science in the Nursery School and Kindergarten. Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly N. Sch. Ed. 135.) 
A resume of fundamental science concepts needed for the teachers' own 
background; study of science situations most frequently of concern to young 
children; specific practice in handling and initiating such situations. 

401. Kindergarten and Nursery School Methods. Credit 5(5-0) 

(Formerly N. Sch. Ed. 141.) 
Methods and materials in daily and long-range curriculum development 
to meet the needs of 2 to 5 year olds. 

402A. Directed Teaching in the Nursery School. Credit 5(1-8) 

(Formerly N. Sch. Ed. 142.) 
Observations and guided teaching experiences in the nursery school. Stu- 
dents will have an opportunity to work in all aspects of the curriculum in 
local schools as well as our campus laboratory center. 

402B. Directed Teaching in the Kindergarten. Credit 5(1-8) 

(Formerly N. Sch. Ed. 142.) 
Observation and guided teaching experiences in the kindergarten. Stu- 
dents will have an opportunity to work in all aspects of the curriculum in 
local schools as well as our campus laboratory center. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

501. Special Problems in Nursery School 

and Kindergarten Education. Credit 3-5 hours. 

(Formerly N. Sch. Ed. Ed. 138.) 
Individual work on special problems in Nursery School and Kindergarten 
Education. 

503. Seminar in Nursery School and 

Kindergarten Education. Credit 1(1-0) 

A review of research and its influence on the educational policies of 
nursery schools and kindergartens. 



DEPARTMENT OF PLANT SCIENCE AND 
TECHNOLOGY 

Samuel J. Dunn, Chairman 



The programs in this department are designed to give the students broad 
scientific and technical training which will enable them to take advantage 
of the many job opportunities available in these fields. There is considerable 
flexibility in the various programs to allow for a choice of electives which 
may better serve the individual needs of the students. 

COURSES IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Undergraduate 

111. Agricultural Drawing. Credit 3(0-6) 

Lettering, use of instruments, multi-view projection drawing, auxiliary 
projection, selection views and dimensioning. 



112 The Agricultural and Technical College 

122. Farm Shop. Credit 3(1-4) 

Proper use of tools, woodwork, bench and vise work, pipe fitting and 
concrete work. 

223. Field Machinery. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly Ag. Engr. 123.) 

Principles, operation, adjustment, and maintenance of farm field ma- 
chinery. 

224. Farm Buildings. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly Ag. Engr. 124.) 

Fundamentals of building construction, applied to location, selection of 
materials, foundations and planning. Prerequisite: Ag. Engr. 111. 

331. Surveying and Drainage. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly Ag. Engr. 131.) 

Principles of surveying and drainage, planning of soil erosion and drain- 
age systems, based on topographical and soil requirements. Prerequisites: 
Soil Science 223, Math. Ill, 112. 

332. Farm Power. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly Ag. Engr. 132.) 

Principles of mechanical power, use, care and adjustment of internal com- 
bustion engines and electric motors. Prerequisite: Physics 111. 

440. Dairy Engineering. Credit 3(2-3) 
(Formerly Ag. Engr. 140.) 

The general engineering principles of power selection, installation and 
maintenance, refrigeration and heat transfer as they apply to equipment 
used in the dairy industry. Also plant arrangement and management. 

441. Rural Electrification. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly Ag. Engr. 141.) 

A study of electricity, electrical wiring, and electrical devices, including 
motors, with particular emphasis upon the relation of these to the home 
and farm. Prerequisites: Physics 111, 112. 

442. Water Supply and Sanitation for the Farm and Home. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Ag. Engr. 142.) 

The planning and installation of farm water and sanitation systems. Pre- 
requisites: Ag. Engr. 122, Bact. 202. 

444. Farm Shop Organization and Management. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ag. Engr. 501.) 
A course designed for prospective and in-service teachers of vocational 
agriculture; includes presentation of purpose, plans, and equipment of 
shops, organization of course of study, and methods of teaching. Prerequi- 
site: Ag. Engr. 122, Ag. Ed. 443. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

500. Conservation, Drainage, and Irrigation. Credit 3(1-4) 

Improvement of soil by use of the study of conservation practices, engi- 
neering structures, drainage and irrigation systems. Prerequisite: Ag. Engr. 
331. 

502. Advanced Farm Shop. Credit 3(0-6) 

Care, operation, and maintenance of farm shop power equipment. Pre- 
requisite: Ag. Engr. 122. 



School of Agriculture 113 

503. Special Problems in Agricultural Engineering. Credit 3(3-0) 

Special work in agricultural engineering on problems of special interest 
to the student. Open to seniors in Agricultural Engineering. 

COURSES IN CROP, SOIL, AND EARTH SCIENCE 
CROP SCIENCE 

Undergraduate 

111. General Field Crops. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Agron. 111.) 
History, classification, distribution, culture and utilization of the impor- 
tant fields crops. Emphasis is placed on factors affecting crop yield and 
principles of production. 

224. Forage Crops. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Agron. 124.) 
Grasses, legumes and other plants and their uses as hay, pasture, silage 
and special purpose forage, identification of plants and seeds and study of 
quality in hay, silage and pasture population. Prerequisite: Cp. Sc. 111. 

*341. Determining Crop Quality. Credit 4(2-4) 

(Formerly Agron. 141.) 
The recognition of high quality crop products as influenced by growth 
and maturity factors, weeds and diseases, determination of commercial 
quality through study of use and grades; identification of crops, planning 
crop exhibits. Prerequisite: Cp. Sc. 111. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

**500. Plant Chemicals. Credit 3(2-2) 

A study of the important chemical pesticides and growth regulators used 
in the production of economic plants. Prerequisite: Chem. 102. 

*501. Crop Ecology. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Agron. 501.) 
The physical environment and its influence on crops; geographical distri- 
bution of crops. 

**502. Breeding of Crop Plants. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Agron. 502.) 
Significance of crop improvements in the maintenance of crop yields; 
application of genetic principles and techniques used in the improvement of 
crops; the place of seed certification in the maintenance of varietal purity 
and production of quality seed. Prerequisite: Zoology 303 or consent of in- 
structor. 

503. Special Problems in Crops. Credit 3 to 5 hours 

(Formerly Agron. 503.) 
Designed for students who desire to study special problems in crops. By 
consent of instructor. 

505. Research Design and Analysis. Credit 3(2-2) 

Experimental designs, methods and techniques of experimentation; appli- 
cation of experimental design to plant and animal research; interpretation 
of experimental data. Prerequisite: Ag. Econ. 532 or Math. 218. 



* Courses to be taught during odd numbered years. 
** Courses to be taught during even numbered years. 



114 The Agricultural and Technical College 

634. Grass-Land Ecology. Credit 3(3-0) 

The use of grasses and legumes in a dynamic approach to the theory and 
practice of grass-land agriculture, dealing with the fundamental ecological 
principles and their application to management practices. 

SOIL SCIENCE 

Undergraduate 

223. Basic Soils. Credit 4(3-2) 

(Formerly Agron. 123.) 

The fundamental nature and properties of soils and introductory treat- 
ment of soil genesis, morphology, and classification. 

332. Soil Fertility. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Agron. 132.) 

General principles of fertility; the physical, chemical, and biological fac- 
tors affecting soil fertility and crop production. Prerequisite: Soil Science 
223; Chem. 101 or consent of instructor. 

333. Soil Fertility Laboratory. Credit 2(0-4) 
(Formerly Agron. 132.) 

Analytical and diagnostic procedures in studying soil fertility problems. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 103; Soil Science 223 and 332 or consent of in- 
structor. 

*442. Soil Genesis and Classification. Credit 4(2-2) 

(Formerly Agron. 142.) 
Soil genesis, morphology and classification of the major soil groups of the 
United States; techniques of making and using soil surveys. Prerequisites: 
Soil Science 223 and 332. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

504. Special Problems in Soils. Credit 3 to 5 hours 

(Formerly Agron. 504.) 
Research problems in soils for advanced students. By consent of instruc- 
tor. 

Graduate 

For description, see bulletin of the Graduate School. 
631. Soils of North Carolina. Credit 3(3-0) 

EARTH SCIENCE 
Undergraduate 

211. Physical Geology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Geol. 111.) 

Relation of geologic principles in the development of a balanced concept 
of the earth and earth history; identification of rocks and minerals; weather- 
ing, water and mineral resources; sediments, metamorphosis and volcanism; 
land forms. Prerequisites: Chem: 101 or consent of instructor. 

212. Elements of Weather and Climate. Credit 3(2-2) 
A study of the fundamental elements of weather. Physical principles in- 
volved in weather conditions as revealed in world patterns of climatic types. 
Processes and techniques used in gathering and interpretations of meter- 
ological data. 



School of Agriculture 115 

343. Aerial Photointerpretation. Credit 3(2-2) 

The interpretation of aerial photography as an aid to the study of ter- 
rains of all types. This course surveys the types of land forms and make 
applications to problems in engineering, military science and in the planning 
for agricultural, urban and regional developmental projects. Prerequisites: 
Earth Sci. 211, Soil Sci. 223 or consent of instructor. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

501. Principles of Astronomy for Elementary and 

Secondary School Teachers. Credit 3(3-0) 

The earth as an astronomical body, relationship between earth and sky, 
the nature of the sun and stars, and the tools and methods of the astron- 
omer. Lectures will be supplemented by night observations. 

540. Introduction to Earth Science. Credit 3(3-0) 

Forces of nature and their interaction on soil formation, its distribution 
and deterioration. The role of physical properties on conservation measures 
will be considered. Prerequisite: Ea. Sci. 211, Soil Sci. 223 or consent of 
instructor. 

602. Earth Science. Credit 3(3-0) 

The development of the earth's surface, its material composition and 
forces acting upon its surface will be considered. Specific topics include 
origin of mountains and volcanos, causes of earthquakes, work of rivers, 
wind, waves, and glaciers. Prerequisite: Ea. Sci. 211, 501 or consent of 
instructor. 

COURSES IN HORTICULTURE 
Undergraduate 

111. General Horticulture. Credit 3(2-2) 
An introduction to the basic principles underlying the production of 

fruits, vegetables, flowers, and ornamentals. Prerequisite: Botany 102. 

112. Amateur Floriculture. Credit 3(2-2) 
General principles of growing flowers on a small scale in the small green- 
house, home, school, and public buildings; growing flowers outside for land- 
scape effect and cutting. 

122. Fruit Production. Credit 3(2-2) 

Principles and practices of tree fruit production, with emphasis on plant- 
ing, soil management, pruning, spraying, pollination, harvesting, and stor- 
age. Prerequisite: Hort. 111. 

223. Greenhouse Construction and Management. Credit 4(2-4) 

(Formerly Hort. 123.) 
Location, maintenance, and operation of greenhouses. Emphasis on en- 
vironmental controls, crop rotation, production problems, and business man- 
agement. Prerequisite: Hort. 111. 

230. Plant Propagation. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Hort. 130). 
Study of the types, construction, and management of propagation struc- 
tures; fundamental principles of propagation by seed, cuttage, budding, 
grafting, and layerage. Prerequisite: Hort. 111. 



116 The Agricultural and Technical College 

233. Vegetable Production. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Hort. 133.) 
Commercial vegetable production with special emphasis on large scale 
production, harvesting, and marketing of vegetables. Prerequisite: Hort. 
Ill or consent of advisor. 

235. Principles of Landscape Planning. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Hort. 135.) 
The fundamentals of design in planning the arrangement of small prop- 
erties, such as the home, school grounds, small parks, and play grounds. 

331. Commercial Flower Production. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Hort. 131a.) 

Culture of floriculture crops in the greenhouse and out-of-doors including 
cutflowers, pot plants, conservatory plants, and bedding plants. Special em- 
phasis on seasonal operations. Prerequisite: Hort. 230. 

332. Commercial Flower Production. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Hort. 131b.) 
Continuation of Hort. 331. Emphasis on seasonal operation and production 
of crops especially for the winter and early spring seasons. 

333. Commercial Flower Production. Credit 5(3-4) 
(Formerly Hort. 131c.) 

Continuation of Hort. 332. Emphasis on the production of seasonal floricul- 
tural crops. Supervised on-the-job training with emphasis on marketing and 
record keeping. 

335. Plant Materials and Landscape Maintenance. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Hort. 136a.) 
Identification, merits, adaptability, and maintenance of deciduous shrubs, 
trees, and vines used in landscape planting; seasonal operations, such as 
lawns building, planting trees, shrubs, bulbs, and perennials. Prerequisite: 
Hort. 230 and 235. 

341. Nursery Management. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Hort. 141.) 
Planning, operations, and methods used by wholesale, retail, and land- 
scape nurseries. Emphasis on cultural practices, records, and selling tech- 
niques. Prerequisite: Hort. 230. 

442. Basic Floral Design. Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly Hort. 143a.) 
Essentials of flower arrangement and plant decorations for the home, 
office, hospital, school and church. 

443. Flower Shop Management. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Hort. 142.) 
Designing, planning, handling of merchandise, buying and selling methods, 
and general policies. 

445. Landscape Design and Construction. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly Hort. 144a.) 

Problems in design of land areas with emphasis on orientation, arrange- 
ment, and circulation. Instruction in planning, presentation, cost accounting, 
and construction. Prerequisite: Hort. 235, Ag. Engr. 111. 

446. Landscape Design and Construction. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly Hort. 144b.) 

Continuation of 445. Problems in design of larger land areas involving 
more complex features; practice in landscape model construction. 



School of Agriculture 117 

447. Landscape Design and Construction. Credit 3(0-6) 

(Formerly Hort. 144c.) 
Continuation of 446. Problems involving grading plans, drainage systems, 
cost estimating, contract specifications, and construction. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

501. Special Problems. Credit 2 to 5 hours 

Work along special lines given largely by the project method for ad- 
vanced undergraduate and graduate students who have the necessary prep- 
aration. 



DEPARTMENT OF SHORT COURSES 

B. W. Harris, Director 



The Department of Short Courses provides training in agriculture for 
persons who may noi, desire to follow a course which leads toward a degree. 
The department also plans and coordinates special educational meetings, 
conferences, workshops, and institutes for farmers, homemakers, ministers, 
and other interested persons. 

Short courses are arranged for persons who may be interested in receiv- 
ing specialized instructions for a limited period of time. It is the aim of 
these courses to increase the knowledge and improve the practices of 
people now engaged in agriculture and related occupations. 

The two-year curricula leading to a certificate are offered in the following 
areas: (1) Animal Husbandry, (2) Dairy Husbandry, (3) Floriculture, (4) 
Landscape Gardening, (5) Poultry Husbandry, (6) Farm Mechanics, and 
(7) General Agriculture. 

The two-year programs are designed to provide the students with a con- 
centration of training and experience required for successful employment 
in one of the above areas. Emphasis is placed on technical training and 
practical experience for competence in a particular vocation rather than 
preparatory work leading to a degree. A student who wishes to pursue a 
degree program will receive credit for courses he has completed that are 
equivalent to those in the degree curricula, if he has met all college entrance 
requirements. 

Request for short courses and information concerning arrangements should 
be directed to the DIRECTOR OF SHORT COURSES, SCHOOL OF AGRI- 
CULTURE, A. AND T. COLLEGE, GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA. 

TWO-YEAR PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

Courses in the two-year programs of study will be scheduled in accordance 
with demand. Interested students are advised to contact the department 
chairman in order to arrange their class schedules. 



118 The Agricultural and Technical College 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

The two-year curriculum in Animal Husbandry is designed to prepare 
students for the following positions: 

1. Livestock farm operators 

a. Tenants 

b. Owners 

2. Herdsmen 

3. Helpers in meat processing plants 

4. Salesmen for feed and livestock supplies 

Course and No. Quarter Hrs. 

Agricultural Economics 222, 331, 441 10 

Agricultural Engineering 122, 223, 224 9 

Animal Husbandry 201, 222, 224, 334, 336, 344, 433, 435, 442 28 

Crop Science 224 3 

Dairy Husbandry 201 3 

English 101, 210 8 

General Agriculture 221, 222 12 

Mathematics 111 5 

Poultry Husbandry 211, 212 6 

Social Science 101 3 

Air or Military Science 9 

Electives 8 

104 
DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

The two-year curriculum in Dairy Husbandry is designed to prepare stu- 
dents for the following positions: 

1. Dairy farm operators 

a. Owners 

b. Renters 

c. Helpers 

2. Herdsmen 

3. Salesmen for feed and dairy supplies 

Recommended Courses 

Course and No. Quarter Hrs. 

Agricultural Economics 222, 223, 331 7 

Agricultural Engineering 111, 122, 224, 332 12 

Animal Husbandry 201, 334 6 

Crop Science 224 3 

Dairy Husbandry 201, 246, 334, 342, 441 15 

General Agriculture 101, 102, 103, 211, 212 15 

General Horticulture 111 3 

English 101, 210 8 

Poultry Husbandry 211, 212 6 

Social Science 101 3 

Air or Military Science 9 

Electives 14 

101 



School of Agriculture 119 

FARM MECHANICS 

The two-year curriculum in farm mechanics is designed to prepare stu- 
dents for the following positions: 

1. Farm shop operators 

2. Farm repair services 

a. Welding 

b. Electrical wiring 

c. Plumbing 

d. Machinery and equipment 

3. Assistants in sales and service programs 

4. Farm equipment operators 

Recommended Courses 

Course and No. Quarter Hrs. 

Agricultural Economics 222, 223 8 

Agricultural Engineering 111, 122, 223, 224, 332, 441, 441 21 

Business Math. 115 5 

Botany 102 4 

Crop Science 111, 224 6 

English 101, 102 10 

General Agriculture 101, 102, 103 3 

Horticulture 111 3 

Mathematics 111, 112 10 

Physical Science 101, 102 10 

Air and Military Science 9 

Electives 17 

106 
FLORICULTURE 

The two-year curriculum in Floriculture is designed to prepare students 
for the following positions: 

1. Greenhouse operators 

a. Owners 

b. Foremen 

c. Helpers 

2. Floral Designers 

3. Helpers in wholesale and retail flower shops 

4. Salesmen 

Recommended Courses 

Course and No. Quarter Hrs. 

Agricultural Engineering 111, 122 6 

Botany 102, 202 8 

Chemistry 101 5 

Crop Science 223 4 

English 101, 102, 103 15 

General Agriculture 101, 102, 103 3 

Horticulture 111, 112, 235, 331, 332, 333, 335, 442 26 

Mathematics 111, 112 10 

Air or Military Science 9 

Electives 15 

101 



120 The Agricultural and Technical College 

GENERAL AGRICULTURE 

The two-year curriculum in general agriculture is designed to prepare 
students for the following positions: 

1. General farm operators 

2. General farm foremen 

3. Skilled helpers 

Recommended Courses 

Course and No. Quarter Hrs. 

Agricultural Economics 222, 223, 441 11 

Agricultural Engineering 122, 223, 224, 331 12 

Animal Husbandry 201 3 

Crop Science 111, 224, 341 10 

Dairy Husbandry 201 3 

English 101, 102, 103 15 

General Agriculture 101, 102, 103, 211, 212 15 

Horticulture 233 4 

Mathematics 111, 112 10 

Poultry Husbandry 211 3 

Social Science 101 3 

Soil Science 223, 332, 333 9 

Air or Military Science 9 

Electives 5 

112 
LANDSCAPE GARDENING 

The two-year curriculum in Landscape Gardening is designed to prepare 
students for the following positions: 

1. Landscape Gardener 

2. Foreman 

3. Estate Maintenance 

4. Propagator and Grower 

Recommended Courses 

Course and No. Quarter Hrs. 

Agricultural Engineering 111, 223, 331 9 

Botany 102, 202 8 

Chemistry 101 5 

English 101, 102, 103 15 

General Agriculture 101, 102, 103 3 

Horticulture 111, 112, 235, 331, 332, 333, 335, 341, 445, 446, 447 ... . 35 

Mathematics 111, 112 10 

Air or Military Science 9 

Electives 8 

102 
POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

The two-year curriculum in poultry husbandry is designed to prepare stu- 
dents for the following positions: 

1. Poultry farm operators 

2. Helpers in grading and processing plants 

3. Salesmen in equipment, feed 



School of Agriculture 121 



Recommended Courses 



Course and No. Quarter Hrs. 

Agricultural Economics 222, 223 8 

Agricultural Engineering 111, 122, 224 9 

Animal Husbandry 210 3 

Dairy Husbandry 201 3 

English 101, 102 10 

General Agriculture 3 

Mathematics 111 5 

Physical Science 101 5 

Poultry Husbandry 211, 212, 221, 222, 331, 332, 334, 441, 442, 443 ... 37 

Social Science 101 3 

Air or Military Science 9 

Electives 5 

100 



SCHOOL OF ED 
AND G 




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Department of Education and Psychology 

Department of English 

Department of Foreign Languages 

Department of Music 

Department of Health and Physical Education 

Department of Social Sciences 



School of Education and General Studies 125 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND GENERAL STUDIES 

Leonard H. Robinson, Dean 



The School of Education and General Studies extends to the students 
opportunities to prepare for teaching careers in the secondary schools of 
the State and the Nation and for several other vocational and professional 
pursuits. The various courses of study are structured so that the student 
may attain competence in both specialized and general areas of Education. 
The School aims at developing in the student not only the knowledge and 
skills that will make for successful vocational endeavor, but those under- 
standings and appreciations that will enable him to live with assurance 
among educated people. 

The School of Education and General Studies comprises the following 
departments: Education and Psychology, English, Foreign Languages, 
Music, Physical Education, and Social Science. 

Curricular Offerings and Degrees: Upon the satisfactory completion of 
one of the undergraduate curricula in the School of Education and General 
Studies the student is eligible to receive the degree of Bachelor of Science 
with a major in the following areas: Economics, English, French, Music 
Education, Physical Education, History, Social Studies, and Sociology. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

A minimum of 200 credit hours and 400 grade points is required for 
graduation. 

In addition to majors and minors, each candidate for graduation will be 
required to meet the following distribution of requirements, both as to sub- 
jects and hours. 

1. English; 18 hours. (Includes Composition; 15 hours and Fundamentals 
of Speech! 3 hours.) 

2. Foreign Language; 10 hours. (French, German, or Spanish) for stu- 
dents who present two admission units of high school credit in the 
same language. Others take the beginning courses; 15 hours. 

3. Health Education. (3 hours). 

4. Humanities; 12 hours (201, 202, 203, 204). Each course carries 3 hours 
credit. 

5. Mathematics; 10 hours. 

6. Orientation. 

7. Physical Education Activity Courses, 6 quarters. (6 hours). 

8. Psychology 201; 5 hours. 

9. ROTC, 6 quarters. (9 hours). Required for male students. 

10. Science Survey; 15 hours (includes Biological Science; 5 hours, and 
Physical Science; 10 hours.) 

11. Social Science Survey; 9 hours (includes World Civilization and Cul- 
tures, Man and His Social Institutions, and Contemporary Social, 
Economic and Political Problems. Each course carries 3 hours credit. 



126 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



SAMPLE SCHEDULE 

The following are typical examples of how normal schedules might be 
arranged. Others more in accord with the student's interest and aptitudes 
might be selected: 

Freshman Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Biological Science 101 5 — — 

Education 101 — — 

English 101, 102, 103 5 5 5 

Health Education (Women) 111 — — 3 

Humanities 201 — — 3 

Mathematics 111, 112 5 5 — 

Phy. Ed. (Men) 101, 103, 111 or 131 1 1 1 

Phy. Ed. (Women) 102, 104, 106 1 1 1 

Physical Science 101, 102 — 5 5 

ROTC (Men) 101, 102, 103 1 1 1 

Social Science 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

19-20 19-21 18-20 

Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

English 210 , 3 — — 

Foreign Language — French, German, or 

Spanish 101, 102, 103 5 5 5 

(For sophomores with no foreign 

language in high school) 
or 

French, German or Spanish 201, 202 5 5 — 

(For sophomores completing two units 

cf the same foreign language in high 

:-chool) 

Health Education (Men) 111 — 3 — 

Humanities 202, 203, 204 3 3 3 

Phy. Ed. (Men) 201 or 203, 205, 211 or 233 1 1 1 

Phy. Ed. (Women) 202, 212, 222 1 1 1 

Psychology 201 — 5 — 

ROTC (Men) 201, 202, 203 2 2 2 

Electives* 5 5 8 



19 



19 



19 



MAJORS AND MINORS 

A student upon entering his third year is expected to concentrate in two 
definite fields of study. In arranging his work he must conform to the 
following regulations. (1) At least forty-five hours of the total number 
required for graduation must be chosen from a particular subject or field, 
in which he must maintain a satisfactory major grade point average. This 
will constitute the student's major group. (2) At least 30 hours must be 
chosen from another subject or field, in which he must maintain a satisfac- 
tory grade point average. This will constitute his minor group. The major 
should represent the student's principal field of interest and the minor, 



* Suggested electives: Education 201, Psychology 203. 



School of Education and General Studies 127 

his second field. Persons preparing to teach are advised to complete majors 
in two fields. 

No student is permitted to major or minor in a subject until he has 
filed out and turned in to the dean of the School of Education and General 
Studies the special application form for majors and minors and has, 
thereby, received the written approval of the heads of the two subject- 
matter departments in which he proposes to concentrate. 

While the completion of a college major ordinarily carries with it more 
courses and credits than are needed for meeting the requirements for 
teacher certification, those students planning to qualify for a teaching 
certificate should consult the requirements of their respective states and 
take care to see that the courses needed for out-of-state certificates are 
included in their programs. This is equally important for those desiring 
certification in the minor field also. 

The following are suggested as fields for major study in this School: 

1. Economics 5. Music 

2. English 6. Physical Education 

3. Foreign Languages 7. Social Science 

4. History 8. Sociology 

9. Social Welfare 

For a minor a student may elect Health Education, Psychology, Recrea- 
tion, or any of the fields mentioned above. 

ELECTIVES 

In addition to minimum distribution requirements, and a major and a 
minor, which are required, each student is permitted to elect such additional 
courses as will be necessary to satisfy the graduation requirements. In so 
doing he is urged to exercise the greatest care in order that his choice may 
add further to the integration and coordination of his program. All such 
electives must be selected with the approval of the student's adviser. 

The elective work may be taken in any of the departments indicated 
previously or from any other department of the institution subject to the 
approval of the Dean of the School of Education and General Studies. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY 

Charles L. Hayes, Chairman 



The Department of Education and Psychology has two responsibilities in 
the educational program of the college. First, in the collaboration with the 
various academic departments, it provides a program in the education of 
secondary school teachers. Second, the department provides a program of 
a minor in applied psychology. 



128 The Agricultural and Technical College 

The Program of Teacher Education 

The program of teacher education seeks to improve the quality of educa- 
tion available to the youth of North Carolina through improved prepara- 
tion of teachers and other school personnel including administrators, guid- 
ance counselors, school secretaries and supervisors. To that end, it offers 
both undergraduate and graduate programs of professional study which 
represent a continuum with similar objectives. The program seeks therefore 
to: 

(1) prepare young people to take their places as competent members of 
the profession of education; and 

(2) Provide opportunities for advanced study for school personnel 
already established in education. 

The Department of Education and Psychology is the central agency 
vested with the authority and responsibility to certify to the State Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction, through the Office of Admission and Records, 
whenever a student is recommended by the Institution for certification in 
the following fields: 

1. Agricultural Education 8. History 

2. Art 9. Home Economics Education 

3. Biology 10. Industrial Education 

4. Business Education 11. Mathematics 

5. Chemistry 12. Nursery School Education 

6. English 13. Physical Education 

7. Foreign Languages 14. Physics 

15. Social Sciences 

In recognition of this function, the approval or endorsement of the de- 
partment providing courses in the areas in which the candidate is to be 
certified must be secured prior to the approval or endorsement of the 
Department of Education and Psychology. The College reserves the right 
to refuse to recommend applicants for certificates when they are deficient 
in mental or physical health, scholarship, character, or other qualifications 
deemed necessary for success in the profession of education. 

The program in teacher education is divided into three separate but in- 
terrelated phases: (1) general education; (2) subject-matter or certification 
specialization; and (3) professional education. 

General Education 

The General Education phase of the Teacher Education Program func- 
tions to provide experiences and learning which meet the fundamental needs 
of all teachers, both in the role of teacher and as a citizen in a democracy. 
General Education provides for the student the understandings, the knowl- 
edge, the appreciation, and the sensitivity attainable through the study of 
a broad range of materials and concepts ranging across the humanities, the 
arts, the social sciences, the natural sciences, and mathematics. It provides 
a broad understanding of the cultural heritage and of the physical and 
social environments. 



School of Education and General Studies 129 

General Education constitutes 40 per cent of the four year Teacher Edu- 
cation Program. It is recommended that the student complete the General 
Education requirements at the end of the sophomore year. 

The specific purposes of the program in General Education are to 

1. Develop competency in the ability to read, write, and speak the 
English language clearly and effectively. 

2. Develop a critical understanding of and a sensitivity to the aesthetic, 
philosophical, ethical, and imaginative values expressed in literature, 
art, music, religion, and philosophy. 

3. Develop and understanding of the development of world civilization, 
and understanding of the basic concepts of the social studies, and an 
understanding of democracy as a way of life. 

4. Develop an appreciation and understanding of the structure of science, 
of scientific inquiry, and of the main scientific principles. 

5. Develop an appreciation and understanding of the structure and appli- 
cations of mathematics. 

6. Develop the knowledge, habits, and attitudes necessary to achieve and 
maintain sound physical and mental health. 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION 

The professional education phase of the program in teacher education 
is designed to discover the prospective teacher of promise and to develop 
the competencies necessary for beginning teachers at the secondary level. 

Approximately twenty per cent of the undergraduate curriculum is de- 
voted to professional education. This phase is designed to achieve the follow- 
ing objectives: 

1. To develop understanding of human growth and development with 
special emphasis on the adolescence years. 

2. To develop understanding of the nature of learning, how it takes place, 
and some factors which may enhance or inhibit its progress. 

3. To develop understanding of materials and methods as they relate to 
learning in the student's area of specialization. 

4. To develop skills necessary for wise use of materials, methods and 
resources applicable to instruction in the student's area of specializa- 
tion. 

5. To develop understanding of the purposes, organization and adminis- 
tration of the school system, with special emphasis on the role of the 
secondary teacher in the total program. 

6. To develop understanding of the social, historical and philosophical 
foundations undergirding the American pattern of education. 

7. To develop a knowledge of the total instructional process through 
direct observation and participation in teaching under strict super- 
vision. 



130 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



8. To develop the skills necessary for the manipulation of materials and 
methods and the guidance of the learning process through direct 
observation and practice of teaching under strict and constructive 
supervision. 

Suggested Sequence in Professional Education 

Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Education 201 — 3 — 

Psychology 201, 203 — 5 3 

8 3 

Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Education 202 3 — — 

Guidance 501 — — 3 

Psychology 301, 302 — 3 3 

3 3 6 

Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Education 301, 304-313, 402 3 3-5 10 

3 3-5 10 

THE MINOR IN PSYCHOLOGY 

In addition to its program in teacher education, the Department offers a 
minor in psychology open to all students who have completed the freshman 
and sophomore or general education requirements. The minor in psychology 
requires the completion of 32 quarter hours in addition to Psychology 201. 
General Psychology. 

Suggested Sequence for Psychology Minor 
Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Psychology 202 or 203 3 — — 

Psychology 303, 304 — 5 5 

3 5 5 

Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Psychology 301, 302 3 3 — 

Psychology 401, 501, 402 or 403 5 3 5 

8 6 5 



School of Education and General Studies 131 

TEACHER EDUCATION ADMISSION AND RETENTION STANDARDS 

Admission 

1. Students who desire to be admitted to the teacher education program 
will make application to the Director of Teacher Education the third 
quarter of his sophomore year. He should be completing the sixth quar- 
ter of the general education sequence. In addition, he should have com- 
pleted (or be completing) Psychology 201-General Psychology and at 
least an additional three quarter hours of professional education. 

2. Applications seeking admission to the teacher education program should 
have in addition to No. 1 above a cumulative grade point average of 2.00. 

Retention 

To remain in the teacher education program the student must: 

1. Maintain scholarship standards in the areas in which he seeks certifica- 
tion and in professional education as determined by the Retention Sub- 
Committee of the Teacher Education Committee. 

2. Take the National Teachers Examination during the quarter when 
scheduled during the senior year. 

3. Complete prerequisite courses in areas of certification and in profes- 
sional courses prior to or concurrent with the quarter of student teach- 
ing. 

4. Have evidence of freedom from communicable diseases and such other 
mental (including emotional) and physical conditions, the possession of 
which would impair the ability to effectively perform the duties of a 
student teacher or a beginning teacher. 

COURSES IN EDUCATION 

Undergraduate 

101. Orientation. Credit none 

A familiarization with methods of improving study, taking notes, and 
using the library. Any quarter of the Freshman year. 

201. Introduction to the Study of Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
An overview of the historical background of the systems of education in 

the United States, their aims, organization and procedures, and of the 
principles and practices on all levels of the American educational system. 
Consideration given to qualifications for teaching with emphasis on the 
requirements of North Carolina. 

202. Philosophy of Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
View of the educative process, and its biological, psychological, and so- 
ciological foundations; emphasis on the philosophical bases and implications 
as they relate to the pupil, curriculum, teacher, and the institution. Pre- 
requisite: Education 201. 

203. Utilization of Audio-Visual Media. Credit 3(2-2) 
A consideration of the improvement of instruction and communications 

through the use of audio-visual media; includes the study of the general 
practices and utilization, selection, production, and evaluation of audio- 
visual media for teaching-learning or other informal education situations. 



132 The Agricultural and Technical College 

204. Audio-Visual Materials Production. Credit 3(0-6) 

The development and application of basic skills in the principles of pro- 
duction of graphic materials as media of communications. For prospective 
teachers and all students who desire to acquire a basic knowledge and 
understanding of communications as media. 

301. Principles of Secondary Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
The history, nature and function of the secondary school and its relation- 
ship to the elementary school and adult life. Prerequisite: 15 quarter hours 
in Education and Psychology. 

302. Public School Music Methods. Credit 3(3-0) 
A comprehensive study of materials and methods in the teaching of 

public school music. Fall. 

303. Vocal Methods and Materials. Credit 5(5-0) 
The teaching of vocal music in the public schools; vocal literature for 

vocal combinations in the public schools. 

304. The Teaching of Physical Education. Credit 3(2-2) 
A study of materials, methods, and practice in planning, organizing, and 

conducting physical education class activities. Prerequisites: 239 and an 
adequate number of other physical education courses. 

305. Methods of Teaching English. Credit 5(5-0) 
A study of materials and methods of teaching English in the high school. 

Required of those planning to teach English. Prerequisites: English 202, 
225, 35 additional hours of English courses above English 103, and 18 
quarter hours in Education and Psychology. 

306. Band Methods. Credit 5(5-0) 
A study of school band organization and administration. Winter. 

307. Methods of Teaching Social Sciences. Credit 5(5-0) 
A study of techniques of social science instruction on the high school 

level. Required of those planning to teach the subject. Prerequisites: 40 
hours of Social Studies and 18 quarter hours in Education and Psychology. 

308. Methods of Teaching Mathematics. Credit 5(5-0) 
An evaluation of subject matter, materials, methods and techniques, and 

objectives in the teaching of mathematics in the junior and senior high 
school. Required of those nlanning to teach the subject. Prerequisites: 30 
hours of Mathematics and 18 hours of Education and Psychology. 

309. Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages. Credit 5(5-0) 
A study of the Droblems and diffculties experienced in teaching foreign 

languages. Special attention given to the matter of classroom aids, equip- 
ment, etc. Required of those students planning to teach the subject. Pre- 
requisites: 40 hours of French and 18 quarter hours of Education and 
Psychology. Fall. 

310. Methods of Teaching Art. Credit 5(5-0) 
A study of the aims, objectives, methods and techniques of art teaching 

in the modern school. Special attention given to planning courses of study, 
presentation, selection of equipment, reference and illustrative material and 
correlation. Required of those wishing to qualify as art teachers. Prerequi- 
sites: 45 hours of Art and 18 hours of Education and Psychology. 



School of Education and General Studies 133 

311. Methods of Teaching Science. Credit 5(-0) 

A study of methods, materials, and techniques of teaching such subjects 
as biology, chemistry, physics, and general science in the high school. Re- 
quired of all those planning to teach in this field. Prerequisites: 40 hours 
of Science and 18 quarter hours of Education and Psychology. 

312. Methods of Teaching Home Economics. Credit 5(5-0) 
A course designed to acquaint the student with home and family life 

education in the elementary and secondary schools. Prerequisite: A 2.0 grade 
point average in major courses and a 2.0 grade point average in Education 
and Psychology courses. 

313. Principles of Extension Education. 3(3-0) 
Background, development, and organization of the agricultural and home 

economics extension services; principles underlying extension education; 
program building and techniques of teaching. 

314. Driver Education and Traffic Safety. Credit 3(2-3) 
This course is designed to train students who may wish to teach driver 

education in the public schools. Emphasis will be placed on the objective 
and scope of driver education, traffic laws, preventive maintenance, skill 
developing exercises and aids to teaching. 

401. Methods of Research and Evaluation in Health and 

Physical Education. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Education 250.) 
The purposes of this course are twofold: (1) to develop some competency 
in the use of various research methods as applied to health education and 
physical education, and (2) to study the methods of evaluating biological, 
social and physiological outcomes for health education and physical educa- 
tion. Elementary statistical procedures are utilized when applicable. 

402. Observation and Practice Teaching. Credit 10(2-16) 
The application and practice of methods, techniques, and materials of 

instruction in a real classroom situation under supervision; includes pur- 
poseful observation; organization of teaching materials; participation in 
other activities which will aid in developing a teacher (guidance activities, 
child accounting, co-curricular activities, parent-teacher associations, teach- 
ers meetings, and ninety or more clock hours of actual teaching. Prerequi- 
sites: overall G.P.A. of 2.00, G.P.A. of 2.00 in both the professional sequence 
and the academic sequences (major and minor areas of specialization and 
Ed. 301, Principles of Secondary Education and Ed. 304-313, Methods of 
Teaching . . . completed or taken concurrently. Maximum load, including 
Ed. 402, is 13 hours. 

403. Driver Education and Teacher Training. Credit 3(2-3) 
This course provides the student with the necessary preparation to or- 
ganize and administer the high school driver education program. Special 
emphasis will be given to methods and resources; scheduling and evaluation. 
Laboratory experience will be provided on the dual control automobile. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

504. Materials and Methods in Teaching Reading. Credit 3(3-0) 
This course deals with the application of principles of learning and child 

development to the teaching of reading and the related language arts. 

505. Introduction to Adult Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
The history, philosophy, and general organization and administrational 

problems of adult education. Prerequisite: Psychology 304. Fall and Spring. 



134 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



506. Methods in Adult Education. Credit 3(2-2) 
Methods of informal instruction, group leadership, conference planning, 

and techniques in handling various issues of interest to adults. For persons 
preparing to conduct adult education programs as well as those preparing 
to serve as instructors or leaders in the public schools and /or in various 
agencies serving adults. Prerequisite: Ed. 506. Winter. 

507. Principles of School Law. Credit 3(3-0) 
Emphasis on statutes and judicial decisions of North Carolina affecting 

public school education. Legal authority, powers, and liabilities of school 
personnel, legal control and limitations of school finance, curriculum, and 
property. 

510. Library Usage for Classroom Teachers. Credit 3(2-2) 

A consideration of the study, collection, organization and graduation of 
instructional materials for educational materials centers at all grade levels; 
also includes methods and techniques for library usage for pupils and 
teachers, central library organization, library requisition practices, and 
library-classroom coordination of the instructional program. For pre-service 
and in-service teachers. 

Graduate 

These courses are open only to graduate students. For descriptions of 
them, see the bulletin of the Graduate School. 

601. Theory of American Public Education. 

604. Introduction to Graduate Study. 

605. Principles of Teaching. 

606. The Curriculum. 

607. History of American Education. 

608. Philosophy of Education. 

609. School Planning. 

611. Audio-Visual Aids Programs. 

612. Methods and Techniques of Research. 

613. Problems of Rural Education. 

615. Problems and Trends in Teaching Social Sciences. 

616. Problems and Trends in Teaching Science. 

618. Childhood Education. 

619. School Publicity and Public Relations. 

623. Educational Sociology. 

624. Elementary School Administration. 

625. Elementary School Supervision. 

626. High School Administration. 

627. High School Supervision. 

628. Introduction to Adult Education. 

629. Methods in Adult Education. 

(Formerly 628b.) 

630. Pupil Personnel Administration. 

(Formerly 629.) 



Credit 3( 


3-0) 


Credit 3< 


3-0) 


Credit 3 


3-0) 


Credit 3 


3-0) 


Credit 3 


3-0) 


Credit 3 


(3-0) 


Credit 3 


(3-0) 


Credit 3 


(3-0) 


Credit 3 


(3-0) 


Credit 3 


(3-0) 


Credit 3 


(3-0) 


Credit 3 


(3-0) 


Credit 3 


(3-0) 


Credit 3 


(3-0) 


Credit 3 


(3-0) 


Credit 3 


(3-0) 


Credit 3 


(3-0) 


Credit 3 


(3-0) 


Credit 3 


(3-0) 


Credit 3 


(3-0) 


Credit 3 


(3-0) 



Credit 3(3-0) 



School of Education and General Studies 



135 



631. Educational Statistics. Credit 3(3-0) 

632. Seminar in Educational Problems. Credit 3(3-0) 

633. The Community College and Post-secondary Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

634. Principles of College Teaching. Credit 3(3-0) 

639. Issues in Elementary Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 639E.) 

640. Issues in Secondary Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 639S.) 

641. Current Research in Elementary Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 640E.) 

642. Current Research in Secondary Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 640S.) 

COURSES IN GUIDANCE 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

501. Introduction to Guidance. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Education 233.) 
A foundation course for prospective teachers, part-time or full-time 
counselors who plan to do further work in the field of guidance or of educa- 
tion. Special consideration will be given to the nature, scope, and principles 
of guidance services. 

Graduate 

These courses are open only to graduate students. For descriptions of 
them, see the bulletin of the Graduate School. 



602. Measurement for Guidance. 

603. Techniques of Individual Analysis. 

604. Educational and Occupational Information. 

605. Introduction to Counseling. 

606. Case Studies in Counseling. 

607. Guidance Practicum. 



Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 5(2-6) 



608. Organization and Administration of Guidance Services. Credit 3(3-0) 



COURSES IN PSYCHOLOGY 
Undergraduate 

201. General Psychology. Credit 5(5-0) 
An introduction to the scope, content, sources of data, and principles of 

psychology. While this course will not be counted to meet the specific re- 
quirements in education for a high school teacher's certificate, it is a pre- 
requisite for other courses in psychology. 

202. Child Psychology. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Psychology 201.) 

A study of the elaboration of behavior from conception to puberty in 
such a way as to discover the principles underlying the wholesome develop- 
ment of children. Prerequisite: Psychology 201. 



136 The Agricultural and Technical College 

203. Adolescent Psychology. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of behavior during the culturally produced transition period be- 
tween childhood and adulthood. Prerequisite: Psychology 201. 

301. Educational Psychology. Credit 3(3-0) 
A study of basic problems underlying the psychology of education; in- 
dividual differences, development of personality, motivation of learning and 
development, nature of learning and procedures which best promote its 
efficiency. Prerequisite: Psychology 202 or 203. 

302. Tests and Measurements. Credit 3(2-2) 
A basic study of standardized and teacher-made measuring devices, accep- 
table methods of selecting, administering, and interpreting all types of tests 
applicable to the school and classroom. Prerequisite: Psy. 304. 

303. Social Psychology. Credit 5(5-0) 
The social application of psychology; social stimulation and response; 

formation of attitudes involved in cooperation-completion, leadership-sub- 
mission, frustration-aggression, crowd and mob phenomena. Prerequisites: 
Psychology 201 and Sociology 231. Winter quarter. 

304. Mental Hygiene. Credit 5(5-0) 
A study of basic principles of adjustment and mental hygiene, varieties 

of adjustment, personality, development, and psychotherapy in theory and 
in practice. Prerequisite: Psychology 201. Spring quarter. 

401. Introductory Experimental Psychology. Credit 5(3-4) 
An introductory study of scientific methodology in psychology; experi- 
ments in learning, the measurement of specific aptitudes, the measurement 
of personality, and the techniques of vocational diagnosis. Prerequisite: 
Psychology 201. Fall quarter. 

402. Applied Psychology. Credit 5(5-0) 
The utilization of psychological principles in five areas of American 

culture; effectively training new generations; maintaining mental health; 
administering justice; promoting economic progress; and, facilitating effi- 
cient production. Prerequisite: Psychology 201. Spring quarter, odd-numbered 
years. 

403. Industrial Psychology. Credit 5(5-0) 
A consideration of the significance of individual differences in industry; 

employee selection and training; reduction of monotony and fatigue and the 
promotion of efficiency; accident prevention; psychological factors in em- 
ployee turnover. Prerequisite: Psychology 201. Spring quarter, even-num- 
bered years. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

501. Theory of Personality Development and Adjustment. Credit 3(3-0) 
A course devoted to discussion of structural theories of personality and 
major theories of personality development from biological, cultural, and 
social points of view. 

Graduate 

These courses are open only to graduate students. For descriptions of 
them, see the bulletin of the Graduate School. 

617. Mental Hygiene for Teachers. Credit 3(3-0) 

621. Educational Psychology. Credit 3(3-0) 

622. Measurement and Evaluation. Credit 3(2-2) 



School of Education and General Studies 137 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 
Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

501. Introduction to Exceptional Children. Credit 3(3-0) 
An over-view of the educational needs of exceptional or "different" chil- 
dren in the regular classroom situation; emphasis placed on classroom 
techniques known to be most helpful to children having hearing losses, 
speech disorders, visual problems, emotional, social handicaps and intelli- 
gence deviation, including slow-learners and gifted children. An introduction 
to the area of special education. Designed for classroom teachers. 

502. Psychology of the Exceptional Child. Credit 3(3-0) 
An analysis of psychological factors affecting identification and develop- 
ment of mentally retarded children, physically handicapped children, and 
emotionally or socially maladjusted children. 

503. Teaching the Slower Learner in the Regular Classroom. Credit 3(2-0) 
A study of materials and methods for adjusting instruction in arithmetic, 

spelling, language, reading to the slower learning child in heterogeneous 
classes. Consideration given to discussion and study of the unit and activity 
program and the drill and skill program in relation to it. 

504. Measurement and Evaluation in Special Education. Credit 3(2-2) 
The selection, administration, and interpretation of individual tests; in- 
tensive study of problems in testing exceptional and extremely deviate 
children; consideration to measurement and evaluation of children that are 
mentally, physically, and emotionally or socially handicapped. Emphasis 
upon the selection and use of group tests of intelligence and the interpreta- 
tion of their results. 

505. Mental Deficiency. Credit 3(3-0) 
A survey of types and characteristics of mental defectives; classification 

and diagnosis; criteria for institutional placement and social control of 
mental deficiency. Prerequisites; Spl. Edu. 601 and 602. 

506. Materials, Methods, and Problems in Teaching 

Mentally Retarded Children. Credit 5(2-6) 

Basic organization of programs for the education of the mentally re- 
tarded: classification and testing of mental defectives; curriculum develop- 
ment and principles of teaching intellectually slow children. Attention is 
also given to the provision of opportunities for observing and working with 
children who have been classified as mentally retarded. Prerequisites: 15 
quarter hours in special education. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

Darwin T. Turner, Chairman 



The English Department assumes three responsibilities in the educational 
program of the institution. First, by means of composition courses, intro- 
ductory literature courses, and laboratory courses, the department attempts 
to develop among the students the language skills required for intelligent 
communication. Second, the department provides the necessary information 
and training for prospective teachers of English. Third, the department 
offers the English majors a foundation of information and of knowledge of 
techniques which will enable them to pursue graduate study effectively. 



138 The Agricultural and Technical College 

COLLEGE REQUIREMENTS 

All entering freshmen and transfer students who have not received credit 
for Freshman English are required to take a proficiency test in English. 
Those who do not pass this test must enroll in Preparatory English 
(English 210). 

All students of the College must complete English 101, 102, and 103. 

THE MAJOR IN ENGLISH 

The major program in English is designed primarily to provide the stu- 
dent with the skills and the knowledge essential to his preparation for 
teaching in the junior or senior high school. In addition, however, the 
curriculum and the experience are intended to furnish the skills in com- 
munication, the exactness of thought, and the cultural background essential 
to the educated man. Consequently, the English major has a foundation 
which should enable him to pursue graduate study in English, library serv- 
ice, education, journalism, drama, speech, history, foreign languages, law, 
philosophy, and related areas. He has a background also which equips him 
to occupy a position, in industry or in business, which demands a person 
who can read, think, and express himself intelligently. 

Requirements: The following courses are required for a major in English: 
English 202 (5), 205 (3), 210 (3), 225 (3), 320 (5), 321 (5), 330 (5), 331 
(5), 332 (5), 335 (3), 340 or 341 (3), 401 (3), 430 or 540 (3), 440 (5), 
450 (0). 

In addition, each English major is expected to become an active partici- 
pant in at least one of the following organizations: the Fortnightly Club, 
the Kappa Phi Kappa Forensic Society, the Richard B. Harrison Players, 
the Register. As a junior or senior, the major serves for two quarters as an 
assistant to one of the instructors in the English Department. During the 
Spring Quarter of the junior year, the major takes a comprehensive exami- 
nation in the field of English. One section will be an examination on the 
reading list presented to the major during his sophomore year. Those fail- 
ing the examination are required to prepare for a second examination. Dur- 
ing the senior year, each major will enroll in English 450 (Seminar), which 
meets one hour per week for no credit. 

Certification requirements: To qualify for a teaching certificate, the stu- 
dent must complete the following courses: Education 201, 202, 301, 305, 
402; Psychology 201, 203, 301; Guidance 501 or Psychology 302. 

Students majoring in English are urged to follow the recommended 
schedule as closely as possible. Although the courses in English above 103 
may be pursued in a different sequence, the student following the schedule 
will find that each course prepares him for the next. 



School of Education and General Studies 



139 



Suggested Program for English Major 
Freshman Year 

Freshman program for School of Education and 

Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Education 201 3 

English 225, 202, 205 3 

English 210 3 

Foreign Language 101, 102, 103 5 

Humanities 202, 203, 204 3 

Physical Education 1 

Psychology 201 — 

ROTC (Men) 201, 202, 203 2 

Electives — 

18-20 

Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Education 202 — 

English 335, 321, 331 3 

English 320, 330, 341 5 

Psychology 203, 301, Guidance 501 3 

Minor 8 

19 

Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

English 332, 430 5 

English 440, 401 5 

English 450 — 

Teacher Certification Program, Minor 

and Electives 9 

19 
Recommended electives in studies other than language 
History 226, Philosophy 221, Philosophy 223. 



General 


Studies 


Winter 


Spring 


5 


3 


5 


5 


3 


3 


1 


1 


5 


— 


2 


2 


— 


5-8 



19-21 



Winter 

5 
5 
3 
6 

19 



Winter 
3 
3 


13 



19-20 



Spring 
3 
5 
3 
3 
5 

19 



Spring 



19 

and literature: 



THE MINOR IN ENGLISH 

Because most students who study in a minor field hope to be able to 
teach in that field if they should be unable to secure a job in their primary 
interest, the minor program is intended to furnish the student with a mini- 
mum foundation for the teaching of English in the junior or senior high 
school. 

Course Requirements: English 202 (5), 210 (3), 225 (3), 321 (5), 330 (5), 
331 (5), 332 (5), 440 (5), 450 (0). 

In addition, each minor is required to pass a proficiency examination in 
English during the Winter Quarter of the third year. Those failing the 
examination are required to enroll in English 201. As a junior or senior, the 
minor serves for two quarters as an assistant to one of the instructors of 
the Department of English. 



140 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



Suggested Sequence for Minor 

Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall 

English 225, 202, 210 3 

3 

Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

English 321, 331 — 

English 330 — 



Senior Year 

Course and No. : Fall 

English 332, 450 5 

English 440 5 

10 



Winter 
5 



Spring 
3 



Winter 
5 
5 


Spring 
5 


10 


5 


Winter 



Spring 



THE MINOR IN SPEECH AND DRAMA 

Course Requirements: English 202 (5), 210 (3), 315 (3), 340 (3), 341 (3), 
410 (3), 411 (3), and 9 hours of electives in speech and drama courses. If a 
student minoring in Speech and Drama is required to pursue certain courses 
as an English major, he must elect substitutes to bring his hours up to 30 
in speech and drama. Other requirements are the same as for the minor 
in English. 

Suggested Sequence for Minor 
Sophomore Year 



Course and No. 




Fall 


Winter 


Spring 


English 210, 202 




3 


5 


— 






3 


5 


— 




Junior Year 








Course and No. 




Fall 


Winter 


Spring 


English 315, 340, 341 
Elective 




3 


3 


3 
3 






3 


3 


6 




Senior Year 








Course and No. 




Fall 


Winter 


Spring 


English 410, 411 

Electives 




3 
. 3 


3 
3 


— 



School of Education and General Studies 141 

COURSES IN ENGLISH 

Undergraduate 
Freshman Composition and Developmental Reading 

100. Preparatory English. Credit 3(3-2) 
(Formerly English 210. )X 

A course designed to meet the needs of students whose scores on the 
placement test in English are below the average required by the College. 
Review of grammar leads to paragraph writing. Instruction is provided in 
developmental reading. 

101. Freshman Composition I. Credit 5(5-0) 
(Formerly English 211.) 

An introduction to oral and written communication; provides the student 
with experience in writing short compositions, outlining written material, 
and improving his reading skills. 

102. Freshman Composition II. Credit 5(5-0) 
(Formerly English 212.) 

A continuation of 101 in which the student is provided with additional ex- 
perience is expository and descriptive composition and the techniques of 
investigative writing. Prerequisite: English 101. 

103. Freshman Composition III. Credit 5(5-0) 
(Formerly English 213.) 

A continuation of 102 in which the student is provided with more inten- 
sive instruction in argumentative writing and narrative composition. Pre- 
requisites: 101 and 102. 

105. Developmental Reading. Credit 1(2-1) 

(Formerly English 216.) 
Instruction and practice in methods of increasing rate of reading and 
techniques of comprehending written material; emphasis upon vocabulary 
study. Required of freshmen who score at the specified levels on the reading 
placement test. 

Completion of English 101, 102, and 103 is a prerequisite for the following 
courses. 

Language and Composition 

201. Advanced Composition. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 244.) 
A study of techniques of narrative, descriptive, expository, and argumen- 
tative composition; intended especially for the student not majoring in 
English who desires additional training in composition and for the student 
who desires instruction in imaginative writing. 

202. Advanced English Grammar and Composition. Credit 5(5-0) 
(Formerly English 237.) 

Required for English majors and minors at the beginning of the sopho- 
more or the junior year. 

An intensive study of grammar and composition intended to equip the 
student with the knowledge of grammar essential to teaching English 
in the junior or senior high school and with additional training in the 
composition skills to enable him to express himself more effectively. 



142 The Agricultural and Technical College 

205. Introduction to the History of the English Language. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 247.) 
A course designed to develop the student's understanding of modern 
English syntax, vocabulary, etymology, spelling, pronunciation, and usage 
and to increase the student's comprehension of English literature of pre- 
vious centuries through a study of the history of the language. 

301. Journalism. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly English 231.) 
Theoretical and practical work in gathering, organizing, and writing 
news; primary attention to the development of journalistic technique; drill 
on the fundamental principles of composition. 

401. Literary Research. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 246.) 
Advanced study in the tools and techniques of literary research and in- 
vestigation; open only to seniors, and to juniors with the approval of the 
department head. 

Speech and Dramatic Arts 

210. Fundamentals of Speech. Credit 3(3-1) 

(Formerly English 224.) 
A study of the fundamental processes essential to effective speech; tests 
and recordings to discover voice and speech defects; projects, exercises, 
and drills to develop skill in a variety of speech situations. Laboratory hours 
arranged for individual students on Tuesday or Thursday between 9 a.m. 
and noon and between 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. This course is a prerequisite for 
all other courses in speech. 

211. Public Speaking. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 225.) 

A study of the methods by which public speeches are made clear, interest- 
ing, and forceful; practice in writing and delivering speeches according to 
the occasion. Prerequisite: English 210. 

215. Theatre Practice. Credit 1(0-2) 

Practical experience in staging and setting up technical designs. Back- 
stage work in costume, makeup, stagecraft, lighting, etc., is required. 

312. Argumentation and Debate. Credit 3(3-2) 
(Formerly English 236.) 

Study and practice in analysis, gathering of material, briefing, ordering 
of arguments and evidence, refutation, and delivery. Prerequisite: English 
210. 

313. Parliamentary Procedure. Credit 1(1-0) 
(Formerly English 229.) 

Theory and practice in the rules and customs governing organization and 
proceedings of deliberative bodies. Prerequisite: English 103. 

315. Elements of Play Production. Credit 3(3-0) 

Study of basic principles in all aspects of production and application of 
these principles to particular situations. Affords opportunities for practical 
experience in acting, directing, lighting, scenery design, and construction. 
Prerequisite: English 210. 

317. Oral Reading and Interpretation. Credit 3(2-2) 

Study of methods of effective oral presentation of literature. Considera- 
tion of quality, pitch, time, and intensity as tools for the effective inter- 
pretation of poetry, drama, etc. Continuous work in oral reading. Pre- 
requisite: English 210 and Humanities 201. 



School of Education and General Studies 143 

340. Survey of the Theatre I. Credit 3(3-0) 
A survey course in the history, literature, criticism, and arts of the 

theatre to the nineteenth century. 

341. Survey of the Theatre II. Credit 3(3-0) 
A continuation of 340, from the nineteenth century to the present. 

410. Phonetics. (Advanced Speech) Credit 3(3-0) 
The study of general American phonetics and its importance in speech 

correction. Prerequisite. English 210. 

411. Introduction to Speech Correction. Credit 3(3-0) 
A study of the causes, symptoms, and treatment of minor speech dis- 
orders. Observation and practice in clinical techniques. Prerequisite: English 
210, Psychology 201, English 410, and consent of the instructor. 

415. Stagecraft and Lighting. Credit 3(2-2) 
Study of principles of scenery construction and painting. Practice in 

mounting productions for major shows. Prerequisite: English 315. 

416. Play Direction. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 228.) 

Elementary principles of staging plays. Practical work in the directing 
of the one-act play. Attention is given to the principles of selection, casting, 
and rehearsing of plays. Exercises, lectures, and demonstrations. Prerequi- 
site: English 340, 341, and 315. 

Literature 

225. Introduction to Literary Studies. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 245.) 

Required of English majors and minors at the beginning of the sophomore 
or the junior year. Not open to any students except majors and minors. 

An introduction to the critical analysis, literary criticism, investigative 
and bibliographical techniques necessary to advanced study in English. 

320. English Literature I. Credit 5(5-0) 
(Formerly English 222.) 

A survey of English literature from the beginning to 1700; a study of 
the literary movements and major authors in relation to the cultural history 
of England. 

321. English Literature II. Credit 5(5-0) 
(Formerly English 223.) 

A continuation of the study of English literature, from 1700 to 1914. 

330. American Literature I. Credit 5(5-0) 
(Formerly English 220.) 

A survey of American literature from colonial days to the pre-Civil War 
period; a study of the literary movements and major authors in relation to 
the cultural history of America. 

331. American Literature II. Credit 5(5-0) 
(Formerly English 221.) 

A continuation of the study of American literature, from 1865-1914. 

332. Contemporary American & British Literature. Credit 5(5-0) 
(Formerly English 242.) 

A study of the major writers in relation to the cultural and literary tra- 
ditions from 1914 to the present; includes a study of Negro authors who 
have contributed significantly to literature. 



144 The Agricultural and Technical College 

335. Classical Mythology and Biblical Literature. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 241.) 
A study of myths and stories of the ancient Greek, Roman, and Hebrew 
civilizations preparing the student for an understanding of the allusions 
of writers of later cultures. 

430. English Novel. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 248.) 
A history of the English novel from the eighteenth century to 1914 and 
of the literary traditions which influenced the development. Offered in alter- 
nate years, beginning in 1960-61. 

440. Shakespeare. Credit 5(5-0) 

(Formerly English 234.) 
An introduction to a study of the works of William Shakespeare through 
a detailed examination of representative works selected from the major 
periods of his development ss a dramatist. 

450. Seminar. Credit 

A discussion of problems in literature and composition. Required of senior 
English majors and minors. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

500. Grammar and Composition. Credit 3(3-0) 
A course designed to provide a review of fundamentals of grammar and 

composition for the elementary or secondary school teacher. 

501. Language Arts Workshop for Elementary Teachers. Credit 3(3-0) 
A course designed to provide elementary school teachers with an oppor- 
tunity to discuss problems related to the language arts taught in the 
elementary school. 

505. Literary Research and Bibliography. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Not open to those who have completed English 401.) 
An introduction to tools and techniques used in investigation of literary 
subjects. 

510. Problems in Voice and Speech. Credit 3(3-0) 

A course designed to provide a review of the fundamental skills of oral 
communication and instruction in public speaking. 

515. Community and Creative Dramatics. Credit 3(3-0) 

An introduction to basic elements and techniques of play production: 
acting, direction, stagecraft, lighting, costuming, play selection. 

520. Children's Literature. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the types of literature designed especially for students in the 
upper levels of elementary school and in junior high school. 

525. Mythology. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the myths which form the basis for allusions in the literature 
of Western civilization. 

530. Shakespeare. Credit 5(5-0) 

An introduction to Shakespeare's works through an intensive study of 
representative comedies, tragedies, and history plays. The graduate student 
will be expected to demonstrate his ability to teach one of the plays. Pre- 
requisite: English 225 or 610. 



School of Education and General Studies 145 

540. The American Novel. Credit 3(3-0) 
A history of the American novel from Cooper to Faulkner. 

Melville, Twain, Howells, James, Dreiser, Lewis, Hawthorne, Faulkner, 
Hemingway will be included. Prerequisite: English 225 or 610. 

541. Literature by American Negroes. Credit 3(3-0) 
A study of prose, poetry, and drama by American authors of Negro 

ancestry. Their works will be studied in relation to the cultural and literary 
traditions of their times. Dunbar, Chestnutt, Johnson, Cullen, Bontemps, 
Hughes, Wright, Ellison, Baldwin, and Yerby will be included. 

Graduate 

These courses are open only to graduate students in secondary education. 
For descriptions of these courses, see the bulletin of the Graduate School. 

606. A History of the English Language. Credit 3(3-0) 

607. Contemporary Grammar. Credit 3(3-0) 

610. Literary Analysis. Credit 3(3-0) 

611. Literary Criticism. Credit 3(3-0) 
621. Milton. Credit 3(3-0) 

625. Eighteenth Century English Literature. Credit 3(3-0) 

626. Romantic Prose and Poetry. Credit 3(3-0) 

627. Studies in American Literature. Credit 3(3-0) 

631. Restoration and 18th Century Drama. Credit 3(3-0) 

632. American Drama. Credit 3(3-0) 
640. Modern British and Continental Fiction. Credit 3(3-0) 
650. Seminar. Credit 1(1-0) 

HUMANITIES 
Undergraduate 

201. An Introduction to the Humanities. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Humanities 200.) Prerequisite: English 101, 102. 
An introduction to the basic concepts essential to an understanding and 
appreciation of literature, music, and the fine arts as interrelated arts. 

202. Humanities I. Credit 3(3-0) 
A chronological survey of master works and artistic movements from 

Greek civilization through the Medieval Period. Prerequisite: Humanities 
201. 

203. Humanities II. Credit 3(3-0) 
A continuation of 202, from the Italian Renaissance through the eight- 
eenth century. Prerequisite: Humanities 201. 

204. Humanities III. Credit 3(3-0) 
A continuation of 203, from the Romantic Period to the present. Pre- 
requisite: Humanities 201. 



146 The Agricultural and Technical College 

DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Waverlyn N. Rice, Chairman 



The Department of Foreign Languages is founded on the principle that 
ability to converse and understand people of other nations as well as 
knowledge of one's own language, is basic to a democratic society. There- 
fore, this Department has dedicated itself to develop the most useful world 
citizens — those who will be able to construct new dimensions in a peace 
loving world. 

The Department of Foreign Languages has for its objectives the follow- 
ing: 

1. To develop reasonable facilities in the reading, speaking, and writing 
of modern foreign languages. 

2. To lead students to an intelligent appreciation of outstanding literary 
masterpieces. 

3. To develop a better knowledge of continental contributions to modern 
culture. 

4. To create a spirit of understanding that will result in proper attitude 
toward different national groups. 

5. To prepare students whose interests are in the area of teaching for 
employment in secondary schools, especially for those of North 
Carolina. 

6. To encourage students who manifest linquistic ability to continue 
further study in this area and possibly research. 

The Department of Foreign Languages offers courses in French, Spanish 
and German. A major is given in French, a minor in French and Spanish 
and basic courses are offered in German. 

Elementary language courses 101, 102, 103 are recommended for those 
students who have no previous knowledge of the language, or who present 
one unit of high school credit. For those students presenting two units of 
high school credit, intermediate language courses 201 and 202 are required. 
However, if students with two units of the language in high school should 
take an elementary course, they are required to complete 15 hours on 
the same level. 

Suggested Sequence for French Major 
Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

French 201, 202, 203 5 5 5 

French 204, 205, 206 3 3 3 

8 8 8 



School of Education and General Studies 147 

Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

French 301, 302. 303 5 5 5 



Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

French 404 5 — — 

Elective — 5 — 

5 5 — 

The Minor in Foreign Languages 

Students electing a foreign language as a minor are advised to include 
the following courses in their programs: 

The Minor in French The Minor in Spanish 

French 201 (5), 202 (5), and 203 (5) Spanish 201 (5), 202 (5), and 203 (3) 

French 204 (3), 205 (3), and 206 (3) Spanish 204 (5) and 205 (3) 

French 301 (5) and 404 (5) Spanish 301 (3) and 302 (5) 

COURSES IN FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

FRENCH 

Undergraduate 

101. Elementary French. Credit 5(5-0) 
Essentials of grammar and pronunciation, acquisition of vocabulary, and 

attention to elementary composition. For students without high school 
French. Fall. 

102. Elementary French. Credit 5(5-0) 
Continuation of grammar and pronunciation. Conversation and dictation 

encouraged. Winter. 

103. Elementary French. Credit 5(5-0) 
Practice in oral and written composition. Acquisition of taste for ad- 
vanced French through reading translation, and interpretation of easy 
modern French prose. Spring. 

201. Intermediate French. Credit 5(5-0) 
Course open to students who have completed two units of high school 

French or college French 101, 102, 103. Brief review of grammar followed 
by practice in pronunciation. Fall. 

202. Intermediate French. Credit 5(5-0) 
Reading of French plays encouraged. Ability to write and converse in 

French further developed. Winter. 

203. Phonetics. Credit 5(5-0) 

Course intended for students majoring or minoring in French. Recom- 
mended for those who wish to improve pronunciation. Spring. 

204. Oral French. Credit 3(5-0) 
Basic oral French course prepares students for French 205 and 206. To 

improve the student's hearing and speaking abilities in French. 



148 The Agricultural and Technical College 

205. Intermediate Conversational French. Credit 3(3-0) 
To give students intensive training in self-expression and to improve 

pronunciation and diction in reading and speaking. Class conducted in 
French. Winter. 

206. Advanced Conversational French. Credit 3(3-0) 
Intensive oral and written work including discussions and compositions 

in French. Assigned outside readings on newspaper articles, literature, 
civilization, etc. encouraged. Spring. 

207. Introductory Scientific French. Credit 3(3-0) 
Emphasis placed on Scientific French on the elementary level. Basic 

scientific vocabulary introduced to enable student to translate French of a 
scientific nature. 

301. Survey of French Literature. Credit 5(5-0) 
(Formerly French Literature of the Middle Ages and the Renais- 
sance.) 

A general introduction to the more advanced study of French literature. 
This course gives a clear idea of the great periods and main tendencies in 
history of French thought and letters from 842 to the present. Fall. 

302. French Literature of the Seventeenth Century. Credit 5(5-0) 
Course presents Classicism through masterpieces of Corneille, Racine, 

Moliere and other authors of the "Golden Period" in French letters. Con- 
ducted in French. Fall. 

303. French Literature of the Eighteenth Century. Credit 5(5-0) 
To study in particular the life and works of Montesquieu, Voltaire, 

Rousseau, and the Encyclopedists. Class Conducted in French. Winter. 

304. French Literature of the Nineteenth Century. Credit 5(5-0) 
Study of the great literary currents of the Nineteenth century, Roman- 
ticism and Realism. Spring. * 

305. Contemporary French Literature. Credit 3(3-0) 
Course deals with the chief writers and literary currents of the time 

through lectures and outside readings. 

401. Advanced French Composition. Credit 5(5-0) 
Advanced course in oral and written self-expression in French. Special 

attention to vocabulary building, free composition, and conversation, pre- 
pared and improvised, covering the many phases of everyday activities. 
Spring. 

402. Advanced French Grammar and Conversation. Credit 5(5-0) 

Course for students having some experience in written French. To im- 
prove oral conversation. Working groups arranged for practice in French 
conversation. Winter. 

403. Advanced French Grammar and Reading. Credit 5(5-0) 
To give the student practical training in the use of advanced French 

grammar and reading. Conducted largely in French. Spring. 

404. French Civilization. Credit 5(5-0) 
A general survey of the history of France, with emphasis on the social, 

political and economic development designed to give the student an under- 
standing of present conditions and events. A detailed study of such French 
institutions as art, music, and education. Course is also offered in conjunc- 
tion with reports of collateral readings. 



School of Education and General Studies 149 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

501. Problems and Trends in Foreign Languages. Credit 3(3-0) 
Problems encountered by teachers given consideration. Place and purpose 

of foreign language in the curriculum today. 

502. Oral Course for Teachers of Foreign Languages. Credit 3(2-2) 
Designed for teachers of foreign languages to improve pronunciation and 

spelling. 

503. Research in the Teaching of Foreign Languages. Credit 3(3-0) 
Open to students who are interested in undertaking the study of a special 

problem in the teaching of a foreign language. 

504. The French Theatre. Credit 3(3-0) 
A thorough study of the French theatre from the Middle Ages to the 

present. 

505. The French Novel. Credit 3(3-0) 
A study of the novel from the Seventeenth Century to the present. 

506. French Syntax. Credit 3(3-0) 
Designed to teach grammar on the more advanced level. 

COURSES IN GERMAN 

Undergraduate 

German 101. Elementary German. Credit 5(5-0) 

Fundamentals of pronunciation and grammar. Attention given to vocabu- 
lary building. 

German 102. Elementary German. Credit 5(5-0) 

Continuation of emphasis on pronunciation, grammar, and vocabulary 
building. Attention given studied and sight translations. Oral practice en- 
couraged. 

German 103. Elementary German. Credit 5(5-0) 

Continuation of emphasis on pronunciation and grammar, with some 
practice in diction and conversation. Maximum attention given to graded 
readings in German prose and poetry. 

German 201. Conversational German. Credit 5(5-0) 

Intensive practice in everyday German is provided. Prerequisites are 
German 101, 102, 103, or approval of instructor. 

German 202. Intermediate German. Credit 5(5-0) 

The course is open to students who have completed German 101, 102, 103. 
The students read a cross-section of the simpler writings in German litera- 
ture and German newspapers. 

German 203. Intermediate German. Credit 5(5-0) 

The students read a significant, simplified novel and learn to write simple 
compositions in German. 

German 204. Intermediate German. Credit 5(5-0) 

Advanced reading is introduced and advanced composition is practiced. 

German 205. Introductory Scientific German. Credit 3(3-0) 

Emphasis placed on Scientific German on the elementary level. Basic 
scientific vocabulary introduced to enable students to translate German of 
a scientific nature. 



150 The Agricultural and Technical College 

German 206. Intermediate Scientific German. Credit 3(3-0) 

This course continues Scientific German of the intermediate level. Em- 
phasis is placed on reading works in Science. 

COURSES IN SPANISH 
Undergraduate 

101. Elementary Spanish. Credit 5(5-0) 
A course for beginners which consists of grammar, composition, transla- 
tion, practice in pronunciation and use of the spoken language. 

102. Elementary Spanish. Credit 5(5-0) 
Continues work of Elementary Spanish 101 with abundant oral and 

written exercises. 

103. Elementary Spanish. Credit 5(5-0) 
Continuation of Elementary Spanish 102. Attention is given to advanced 

grammar and development of conversational skills. 

201. Intermediate Spanish. Credit 5(5-0) 
For students who have completed two units of high school Spanish or 

College Spanish 101, 102, and 103. Review of salient points of elementary 
grammar. 

202. Intermediate Spanish. Credit 5(5-0) 
Reading of Spanish plays, short stories, and novels. Emphasis on oral 

practice and composition. 

203. Phonetics. Credit 3(3-0) 
A systematic analysis of speech sounds, and the operation of phonetic 

laws. 

204. Intermediate Conversation. Credit 5(5-0) 
Practice and drill in oral Spanish based principally on topics of current 

interest. 

205. Introduction to Spanish Literature. Credit 3(3-0) 
Readings of representative authors of Spain. 

301. La Cultura Hispanica. Credit 3(3-0) 
A course which covers the basically significant elements of Hispanic 

Civilization: geography, history, literature, and economics of the Spanish 
people. 

302. Survey of Spanish Literature. Credit 5(5-0) 
A survey of Spanish literature from the Cid through the golden age with 

lectures: illustrated readings and reports. 

303. Survey of Spanish Literature. Credit 5(5-0) 
A survey of Spanish literature from the seventeenth century to the 

present. 

304. Syntax. Credit 3(3-0) 
Systematic study of Spanish grammar with conversational and other 

exercises based on contemporary authors. 



School of Education and General Studies 151 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

Howard T. Pearsall, Chairman 



Geared toward teacher-education, the Department of Music purports to 
teach those musical facts, elements, and basic skills necessary for the de- 
velopment of a literate music teacher. In keeping with such teaching the 
department's objectives are: 

1. A knowledge of the structural elements in music through the develop- 
ment of sound personal musicianship and the acquisition of such 
functional skills as transposition, score reading and analysis, and 
arranging for instruments as required in teaching situations. 

2. A sensitivity to and critical awareness of the elements of aesthetic 
musical performance through a performance of and reading of standard 
technique and characteristic tone quality of each band and orchestral 
instrument in symphonic bands. 

3. A comprehensive understanding of music history and literature cover- 
ing the various eras in music. 

4. Adequate training in teaching and conducting ensembles, including 
interpretation. 

5. A functional command of the keyboard through skills in reading, 
transposing, and improvising accompaniments for the classroom, as- 
sembly singing and other occasions. 

6. An understanding of materials, equipment and methods of teaching 
music on all levels and a concept of the sequential development of 
music learning. 

7. An understanding of many facets in professional education, such as 
(1) an understanding of the normal sequences of human growth, and 
development, (2) the ways learning take place, (3) the purpose, or- 
ganization, and administration of the school system, (4) a broad 
social, historical, and philosophical orientation to the school in our 
society and to the profession of teaching, and (5) experiences in the 
total program through practice teaching. 

8. An understanding of man's place in society through a survey of the 
Humanities, Physical Sciences, Biological Sciences, and Social Sciences. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

1. In class subjects such as harmony, history of music, etc., and academic 
subjects, one quarter hour of credit shall be given for one period of 
recitation (50 minutes) plus two hours of preparation each week of 
quarter, inclusive of examinations. One hour of credit shall be given 
for two laboratory periods. In subjects such as ear training, sight 
singing, dictation, ensemble, etc., where little outside preparation is 



152 The Agricultural and Technical College 

required, two 50 minute laboratory periods per week shall be required 
for one quarter hour of credit. 

2. One quarter hour credit shall be given for each three hours per week 
of practice, plus the necessary group instruction, with a maximum of 
four credits per quarter allowed for the major subject in applied 
music. 

Specific Requirements for Undergraduate Degree 

Two hundred quarter hours are necessary. Of these, 80 hours should be 
General Culture (non-music subjects, areas in communication and in mathe- 
matics, psychology, other than Educational Psychology, Music Literature 
and History, The Humanities, Social Science Survey, Biological Science 
Survey and Natural Science Survey) ; 80 hours should be music courses 
(Ear Training and Dictation, Harmony, Form- and Analysis, Counterpoint, 
and Instrumental Arranging, Ensemble, Piano, Major Performance and 
Minor Performance); and 40 hours should be Professional Education (music 
Education Methods and Materials, Observation and Student Teaching, and 
Professional Education Courses aside from Music Education). Students 
must participate in a music ensemble each quarter of residence. Examina- 
tions for major and minor instruments will be by jury of the music faculty. 

The Major in Music 

The Department of Music's curriculum is designed primarily toward the 
teaching of instrumental music in the public schools. The pursuance of 
courses leading to the B.S. Degree in music should enable one to get a 
teaching certificate for the State of North Carolina. The students who 
complete courses for the B.S. Degree may or may not be able to get a 
teacher's certificate for states other than North Carolina. It is their re- 
sponsibility to write to the State Departments in those states, other than 
North Carolina, in which they wish certification. 

Suggested Programs 

Freshman Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Biological Science 201 — — 5 

Education 101 — — 

English 101, 102, 103 5 5 5 

Health Education 111 — — 3 

Mathematics 111, 112 5 5 — 

Music 128 — — 2 

Music (Band and Orchestral Instrumental 

Major) 131, 141, 151 1 1 1 

Music (Piano Major) 132, 142, 152 1 1 1 

Physical Science 101, 102 5 5 — 

ROTC 101, 102, 103 1 1 1 

Social Science 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

20 20 20 



School of Education and General Studies 



153 



Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Education 201 — 3 — 

German 101, 102, 103 5 5 5 

Humanities 201, 202, 203 3 3 3 

Music 201, 202, 203 3 3 3 

Music 228, 238, 248 2 2 2 

Music (Band and Orchestral Instrumental 

Major) 231, 241, 251 1 1 1 

Music (Piano Major) 232, 242, 252 1 1 1 

Psychology 201, 203 5 — 3 

Physical Education (Men) 101, 103 — 1 1 

Physical Education (Women) 102, 104 — 1 1 

ROTC 201, 202, 203 2 2 2 

21 21 21 

Junior Year 

Band and Orchestral Instrumental Major 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Education 202 3 — — 

Guidance 501 — — 3 

Music 301, 302, 303 3 3 5 

Music 318, 319, 320 3 3 3 

Music 321, 331, 341 1 1 1 

Music 323, 324, 325 2 2 2 

Music, 328, 338, 348 2 2 2 

Music 329, 339, 349 2 2 2 

Physical Education (Men) 111, 201, 205 .... 1 1 1 

Physical Education (Women) 106, 202, 212 . 1 1 1 

Psychology 301 — 3 — 

17 17 19 

Junior Year 

Organ or Piano Major 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Education 202 3 — — 

Guidance 501 — — 3 

Music 301, 302, 303 3 3 5 

Music 318, 319, 320 3 3 3 

Music 323, 324, 325 2 2 2 

Music 326, 336, 346 2 2 2 

Music 328, 338, 348 2 2 2 

Music 332, 342, 352 1 1 1 

Physical Education (Men) 111, 201, 205 ... 1 1 1 

Physical Education (Women) 106, 202, 212 1 1 1 

Psychology 301 — 3 — 

17 17 19 
Senior Year 
Band and Orchestral Instrumental Major 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Education 301, 306, 302 3 5 3 

Education 402 — — 10 



154 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



Music 401, 402 5 5 — 

Music 403 3 — — 

Music 418, 419 2 2 — 

Music 426, 436 2 2 — 

Music 428, 438 2 2 — 

Music 431, 441 1 1 — 

Physical Education — 1 — 

18 18 13 

Senior Year 

Organ or Piano Major 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Education 301, 306, 302 3 5 3 

Education 402 — — 10 

Music 401, 403 5 3 — 

Music 404 3 — — 

Music 418, 419 2 2 — 

Music 426, 436 2 2 — 

Music 428, 438 2 2 — 

Music 432, 442 1 1 — 

Physical Education — 1 — 

18 16 13 

COURSES IN MUSIC 

Undergraduate 

THEORY 

001. Remedial Theory. No Credit 

(Formerly Music 201.) 
Notation, scales, intervals, triads in all positions, in all major keys, with 
ear training, sight singing, and dictation. 

002. Remedial Theory. No Credit 

(Formerly Music 202.) 
A continuation of 001, with triads in minor keys. 

003. Remedial Theory. 

(Formerly Music 203.) 
A continuation of 002. 

200. Sight Singing. Credit 1(0-2) 
Learning to sing simple melodies at sight. For choir, male singers, and 

home economics majors. 

201. Theory I. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 204.) 

Use of primary & secondary triads in four parts, use of figured bass, 
non-harmonic tones. 

202. Theory II. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 205.) 

Seventh chords, altered chords, secondary dominants. 

203. Theory III. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 206.) 

Augmented chords, modulation. 



School of Education and General Studies 155 

301. Theory IV. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 207.) 

Ninth chords, eleventh chords, thirteenth chords, advanced modulation. 

302. Theory V. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 208.) 

A continuation of 204. 

303. Counterpoint. Credit 5(5-0) 
(Formerly 210.) 

Sixteenth century polyphonic compositions; use of modes; Introduction 
to eighteenth century countrapuntal style. 

401. Form and Analysis. Credit 5(5-0) 
(Formerly 209.) 

Techniques of harmonic, contrapuntal, and formal analysis of music of 
the sixteenth century, Baroque, Vienesse Classical, Romantic, and Impres- 
sionistic periods. 

402. Instrumental Arranging. Credit 5(5-0) 
(Formerly 212.) 

The art of writing for small combinations of instruments; the art of 
sectional writing for instruments; the art of scoring for full band. 

403. Score Reading and Conducting. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly 211.) 

404. Accompanying. Credit 3(1-4) 

Music Literature 

316. Music for the Home, School, and Community. Credit 2(1-2) 

(Formerly 216.) Designed for Home Economics Majors. 
The function of music in daily living, with emphasis on listening for 
personal growth. Music for receptions, dinners, and other festivities. Music 
clubs, the community concerts, and music in recreation. 

318. History and Appreciation of Music. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Music 218.) 

Music of the ancient Greeks to the seventeenth century. For Music majors. 

319. History and Appreciation of Music. Credit 2(2-2) 
(Formerly Music 219) 

Music of the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries. For Music Majors. 

320. History and Appreciation of Music. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Music 220.) 

Music of the Neo-Romantic and modern periods. For Music Majors. 

323. Percussion Instruments. Credit 2(1-2) 
(Formerly Music 223.) 

The percussion instruments studied. Some proficiency on at least one 
instrument of this section is required of each student. 

324. Woodwind Instruments. Credit 2(1-2) 
(Formerly 224.) 

Woodwind instruments studied. Some proficiency on at least one instru- 
ment of this section is required. 



156 The Agricultural and Technical College 

325. Brass Instruments. Credit 2(1-2) 
(Formerly Music 225.) 

The brass instruments studied. Some proficiency on at least one instru- 
ment of this section is required of each student. 

326, 336, 346, 426, 436. Voice Classes. Credit 2(0-4) 

(Formerly Music 226.) 
Open to qualified persons who wish to know the technique of vocal culture. 

418. Music of the Baroque. Credit 2(2-2) 
(Formerly 221.) 

419. Music of the Romantic Era. Credit 2(2-2) 
(Formerly 222.) 

Applied Music 

Each music major will select a major instrument and two minor instru- 
ments. One of the minor instruments should be piano if the student has not 
had such study. Thirty-two quarter hours of applied music are required for 
the State of North Carolina certification and these instruments should be 
started in the freshman year. Music 323, 324, and 325 may be included in 
the total number of hours for credit. Major instruments must be studied 
for three years, and minor instruments for five quarters. 

Definition of Major Courses — A major course is designed to give intensive 
and extensive training in an instrument and includes an individual lesson 
of one hour weekly, or the equivalent in smaller groups. 

A minimum of one and one-half hours daily practice is retquired. The 
following instruments are suitable for major concentration: 

Major Instruments 



Piano 


Oboe 


Percussion 


Organ 


Bassoon 


Trombone — Baritone 


Flute 


Cornet — Trumpet 


Tuba — Bass 


Clarinet 


French Horn 




Saxophone 







NOTE: All examinations in major instruments are by jury composed of 
faculty. 

Definition of Minor Courses — A minor instrument course is designed to 
give those students whose major instrument is in another family a practical 
approach to an additional instrument, preferable in a different instrument 
family. Instruction in minor courses include small groups. One hour of daily 
practice is required. The following courses and instruments are suitable for 
minor concentration. 



Minor Instruments 



Piano 


Harp 


Organ 


Flute 


Violin 


Oboe 


Viola 


Bassoon 


Cello 


Clarinet 


Bass Viol 


Saxophone 



Cornet — Trumpet 
French Horn 
Trombone — Baritone 
Tuba — Bass 
Percussion 
Voice 



School of Education and General Studies 157 

004. Piano Classes. No Credit 

These courses designed for band majors and minors. Simple compositions, 
scales and arpeggios studied. 

128, 228, 238, 248, 328, 338, 348, 428, 438. Major Instruments. Credit 2(0-5) 
Each music major will select a major instrument. Proficiency on major 
instruments will be determined by lessons and by regular appearance of 
student recitals. 

329, 339, 349. Minor Instruments. Credit 2(0-4) 

Each music major will select a minor instrument. 

131, 141, 151. Senior Band. Credit 1(0-5) 

(Formerly 231.1 a,b,c.) 
For students planning to major or minor in band or orchestral instru- 
ments; open to qualified freshmen who have had at least two years of 
previous training on a band or orchestral instrument. This includes the 
College Marching and Symphonic bands. Required of all band and orchestral 
instrument majors. 

231, 241, 251. Senior Band. Credit 1(0-5) 

(Formerly 231.3 a,b,c.) 
For qualified sophomores. Required of all band and orchestral instrument 
majors. 

331, 341, 351. Senior Band. Credit 1(0-5) 

(Formerly 231.3 a,b,c.) 
For qualified juniors. Required of all band and orchestral instrument 
majors. 

431, 441, 451. Senior Band. Credit 1(0-5) 

(Formerly 231.4 a,b,c.) 
For qualified seniors. Required of all band and orchestral instrument 
majors. 

132, 142, 152. Choir. Credit 1(0-4) 

(Formerly 231.1 a,b,c.) 
Representative sacred and secular choral masterpieces from the fifteenth 
century to the present. Open to qualified freshman. Required of all piano 
majors. 

232, 242, 252. Choir. Credit 1(0-4) 

(Formerly 232.2 a,b,c.) 
For qualified sophomores. Required of all piano majors. 

332, 342, 352. Choir. Credit 1(0-4) 

(Formerly 231.3 a,b,c.) 
For qualified juniors. Required of all piano majors. 

432, 442, 452. Choir. Credit 1(0-4) 

(Formerly 231.4 a,b,c.) 
For qualified seniors. Required of all majors. 

133, 143, 153. Male Singers. Credit 1(0-4) 

(Formerly 233.1 a,b,c.) 
The best in choral literature for male voices studied and presented. For 
qualified freshman. 

233, 243, 253. Male Singers. Credit 1(0-4) 

(Formerly 233.2 a,b, c.) 
For qualified sophomores. 



158 The Agricultural and Technical College 

333, 343, 353. Male Singers. Credit 1(0-4) 

(Formerly 233.3 a,b,c.) 
For qualified juniors. 

433, 443, 453. Male Singers. Credit 1(0-4) 

(Formerly 233.4 a,b,c.) 
For qualified seniors. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 
MUSIC EDUCATION 

534. Music in the Elementary School. Credit 3(3-0) 
Selection and presentation of the rote song; the child's voice in singing — 

its care and development; the introduction and development of music read- 
ing; rhythmic development; creative music and the listening program. 

535. Music in the Secondary School. Credit 3(3-0) 
Techniques of vocal and instrumental music instruction in the junior 

and senior high school; the general music class; the organization, admin- 
istration, and supervision of music programs; The course includes the 
adolescent's voice and its care; the testing and classification of voices; 
operetta production, instrumental technology and repair; and a study of 
materials and methods pertinent to the secondary music curriculum. 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

William M. Bell, Chairman 
Randa D. Russell, Chairman, Women's Division 



The Objectives of the Department of Health and Physical Education are: 

1. To provide instruction in a wide variety of physical education activities 
to meet the needs and interests of all students in the required general 
education program of the College. 

2. To promote participation in wholesome extra-class activities through 
sponsoring and supervising such organizations as the Cheerleaders' 
Squad, Dance Group, Gymnastic Squad, Womens Athletic Association, 
and Intramural Leagues. 

3. To provide opportunity for wholesome competition for men possessing 
exceptional athletic ability through a well-balanced program of varsity 
athletics. 

4. To provide recreational outlets for students and members of the college 
community through conduct of informal recreational activities. 

5. To enrich the total College program through cooperation with the pro- 
grams of such units of the College as the music and dramatic groups, 
alumni association, agricultural, homemaking groups, guidance and 
health service divisions. 



School of Education and General Studies 159 

6. To provide necessary preparation for students planning careers as 
teachers of junior and senior high school health and physical education 
and as athletic coaches and recreation leaders. 

7. To provide courses in health and physical education which meet State 
and National Teacher Certification standards. 

Any student who, in the opinion of the College medical staff, is unfit to 
participate in the required activity program may elect a restricted course 
or any part of a course which will not aggravate the present disability. 

Students must be prepared, upon matriculation, to place their orders for 
the activity uniforms, the approximate cost of which is $12 for men and 
$10 for women. Swimming uniforms cost approximately $5. 

General Physical Education Requirement for Women 

Women students in the general education program should complete six 
quarters of physical education. To assure a well balanced program, courses 
should be selected according to the sequence below. 

Freshman Requirements: 3 credits, to include 102, 104, and 106. 

Sophomore Requirements: 3 credits to include: (1) a teams sports course, 

(2) an individual sports course, and (3) a course in either dance, gym- 
nastics, or aquatics. Courses may be taken in any quarter, but not more 
than one course shall count toward the six quarter requirement during 
a quarter. 

Junior and Senior Election: Upperclassmen who have fulfilled the six quar- 
ter activity requirement and who wish to gain more experience than is 
afforded by the required sequence may elect any physical education ac- 
tivity course numbered above 200. 

NOTE: ALL WOMEN'S COURSES END IN EVEN NUMBERS. 

Courses for Women 

102. Fundamentals of Physical Education. I Fall Credit 1(0-2) 

Movement exploration, basic concepts, activities, skills, and form essential 
to play and work. Evaluation of physical potential and improvement of 
function through progressive sequence of experiences. Sports, dance, and 
physical education in contemporary culture. 

104. Fundamentals of Physical Education II. Winter. Credit 1(0-2) 

A continuation of 102. 

106. Fundamentals of Physical Education III. Spring. Credit 1(0-2) 

A continuation of 104. 

152, 154, 156. Adapted Physical Education Activities. 

Fall, Winter, Spring. Credit 1(0-2) each quarter 
(formerly 215 a,b,c.) 
Special activities designed for those students whose medical examina- 
tions show that they are unable to participate in regular physical educa- 
tion classes. 



160 The Agricultural and Technical College 

202. Team Sports: Hockey-Soccer. Fall. Credit 1(0-2) 

Fundamental techniques, rules, strategy, terminology, and cultural sig- 
nificance of field hockey and soccer. 

204. Team Sports: Basketball-Volleyball. Winter. Credit 1(0-2) 

Fundamental techniques, rules, strategy, terminology, and cultural sig- 
nificance of basketball and volleyball. 

206. Team Sports: Speedball-Softball. Spring. Credit 1(0-2) 

Fundamental techniques, rules, strategy, terminology, and the cultural 
significance of softball and speedball. 

212. Individual Sports: Archery-Badminton. Credit 1(0-2) 

(formerly 220c.) 

Techniques, rules, playing courtesies, and significance of individual sports 
to college and after school life. 

214. Individual Sports: Recreational Games. Credit 1(0-1) 

Shuffleboards, handball, deck tennis, table tennis, croquet, modified bowl- 
ing, and horseshoes. 

216. Individual Sports: Tennis-Golf. Credit 1(0-2) 

Elementary techniques, rules, playing courtesies, terminology, and sig- 
nificance of individual sports to contemporary culture. 

222. Modern Dance. Credit 1(0-2) 

(formerly 217.) 
To develop an understanding of the various qualities of movement, the 
techniques of obtaining and applying them in the art form of dance. 

224. Folk and Tap Dance. Credit 1(0-2) 

Clog, tap, and folk dances characteristic of many nationalities. 

226. Social and Country Dance. Credit 1(0-2) 

Ballroom, square, and round dance forms; fundamentals, leading and 
following, dance etiquette. 

232. Aquatics: Beginning Swimming. Credit 1(0-2) 

(formerly 219.) 
The elementary skills as outlined in the American Red Cross standards 
for beginning swimmers. 

234. Aquatics: Intermediate Swimming. Credit 1(0-2) 

(formerly 219a.) 
Coordinated strokes, fundamentals of diving and skills outlined in the 
American Red Cross standards for intermediate swimmers. 

236. Aquatics: Life Saving. Credit 1(0-2) 

(formerly 219b) 
Fundamental skills and techniques of live saving as outlined in the 
American Red Cross Standards for Life Saving and Water Safety. 

242. Gymnastics. Credit 1(0-2) 

Elementary tumbling, apparatus work, and free exercise. 

244. Intermediate Gymnastics. Credit 1(0-2) 

Individual routines and performance techniques on the balance beam, 
trampoline, parallel bar, and in free exercise. 



School of Education and General Studies 161 

252, 254, 256. Adapted Physical Education. Credit 1(0-2) each quarter 

(formerly 221, a,b,c.) 
A continuation of 156. 

312. Golf. Credit 1(0-2) 

(formerly 214) 

Rules, techniques, performance skills, playing courtesies of golf. Oppor- 
tunity to play golf on a regulation golf course. Prerequisite: six quarters 
of P.E. 

314. Ice Skating. Credit 1(0-2) 

Fundamental skills of ice skating. Opportunity to skate on regulation 
ice rink. Prerequisite: six quarters of P.E. 

316. Bowling. Credit 1(0-2) 

Rules, techniques, and game skills of bowling. Opportunity to bowl on 
regulation bowling alley. Prerequisite: six quarters of P.E. 

318. Tennis. Credit 1(0-2) 

(formerly 213.) 
Rules, techniques, strategy, and playing courtesies of tennis. Emphasis 
upon singles and doubles game play. Prerequisite: six quarters of P.E. 

Courses for Men 

Six quarter hours of Physical Education are needed to meet the general 
education requirement of the College. All freshmen men are required to take 
101 Fundamentals I, 103 Fundamentals II, 111 Combatives, Track and Field 
or 131 Beginning Swimming. 

Sophomores are required to take three Physical Education courses com- 
prised of two team sports and one individual sport which may be elected 
from the following groups: (1) 201 Softball and Soccer or 203 Touch Foot- 
ball and Speedball, (2) 205 Volleyball and Basketball, and (3) one of the 
following: 211 Archery, 213 Recreational games, 217 Beginning Tennis, 219 
Golf, or 233 Intermediate Swimming. NOTE: All men's courses end in odd 
numbers. 

101. Fundamentals of Physical Education I. Credit 1(0-2) 

(formerly 201.) Required of all freshmen men. 

To develop an understanding of the value and the logic behind exercise 
and sports activity and regular habits of exercise, to determine the physical 
fitness needs of the students through a scientific testing program, and to 
familiarize the student with the nature, basic rules, techniques and skills 
of a wide variety of popular American sports and guide him into activities 
which will be of most interest and benefit to him now and in the future. 

101. Fundamentals of Physical Education II. Credit 1(0-2) 

(formerly 202.) Required of all freshmen men. 

A continuation of 101. 

111. Combatives, Track and Field. Credit 1(0-2) 

(formerly 210c.) 
To develop performance skills, techniques and understanding of a wide 
variety of individual, dual and team combatives, track and field activities. 

131. Swimming, Beginning. Fall, Winter, Spring Credit 1(0-2) 

(formerly 219.) 

To teach the elementary skills as outlined in the American Red Cross 
Standards for beginning swimmers. 



162 The Agricultural and Technical College 

151. Adapted Physical Education. Fall Credit 1(0-2) 

(formerly 215a.) 
Special activities designed for those students whose physical examinations 
show that they are unable to participate in the regular physical education 
classes. 

153. Adapted Physical Education. Winter Credit 1(0-2) 

(formerly 215b.) 
A continuation of Physical Education 151. 

155. Adapted Physical Education. Spring Credit 1(0-2) 

(formerly 215c.) 
A continuation of Physical Education 153. 

Team Sports for Sophomore Men 

201. Softball and Soccer. Fall. Credit 1(0-2) 

(formerly 210a and 220c.) 
To develop an understanding of rules, strategy and performance skills 
in sotfball and soccer. 

203. Touch Football and Speedball. Fall Credit 1(0-2) 

(formerly 210a and 220a.) 
To develop an understanding of rules, strategy and performance skills 
in touch football and speedball. 

205. Volleyball and Basketball. Winter Credit 1(0-2) 

(formerly 210c and 220b.) 
To develop an understanding of rules, strategy and performance skills 
in volleyball and basketball. 

Individual Sports for Sophomore Men 

211. Archery and Badminton. Fall and Spring Credit 1(0-2) 

(formerly 220c (w).) 
To develop an understanding of rules, strategy and performance skills 
in archery and badminton. 

213. Recreational Games. Fall, Winter, Spring Credit 1(0-2) 

To develop an understanding of and performance skills in a wide variety 
of recreational games such as shuffleboard, handball, deck tennis, croquet 
and horseshoes. 

217. Beginning Tennis. Fall and Spring Credit 1(0-2) 

(formerly 213.) 
To develop an understanding of rules, strategy and performance skills in 
tennis. 

219. Beginning Golf. Fall and Spring. Credit 1(0-2) 

(formerly 214.) 
To develop techniques and performance skills in golf. 

233. Swimming, for Intermediates. Fall, Winter, Spring Credit 1(0-2) 

(formerly 219a.) 
A continuation of 131. 

235. Swimming, Life Saving. Fall, Winter, Spring Credit 1(0-2) 

(formerly 219b.) 
To teach the fundamental skills and techniques as outlined in the Ameri- 
can Red Cross Standards for Life Saving and Water Safety. 



School of Education and General Studies 163 

243. Gymnastics. Fall, Winter, Spring Credit 1(0-2) 

(formerly 218.) 
To develop performance skill and techniques in tumbling and apparatus. 

251. Adapted Physical Education. Fall Credit 1(0-2) 

(formerly 221a.) 
A continuation of 155. 

253. Adapted Physical Education. Winter Credit 1(0-2) 

(formerly 221b.) 
A continuation of 251. 

255. Adapted Physical Education. Spring Credit 1(0-2) 

(formerly 221c.) 

A continuation of 253. 

Elective courses for junior and senior students who have completed all 
physical education requirements, and elected by sophomores upon approval 
of advisor. 

313. Skating, for beginners. Winter Credit 1(0-2) 

To develop performance skills and techniques in ice skating. 

315. Bowling. Winter Credit 1(0-2) 

To develop performance skills and techniques in bowling. 

HEALTH EDUCATION COURSES 

(Open to all Students) 

111. Personal Hygiene. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 211.) 
This course is designed to give the student definite knowledge of the 
principles of personal health, both mental and physical, and to prepare 
him for self-guidance through and beyond the college years. Emphasis is 
placed upon information pertinent to social behavior today and upon effec- 
tive approaches to college living. 

212. First Aid. Credit 1(0-2) 

For students other than those majoring in physical education. First Aid 
to the injured in the home, school and community. A consideration of First 
Aid practices with laboratory experiences as well as lecture and discussion 
opportunities. Successful completion of this course leads to the Red Cross 
Standard certificate in First Aid. 

234. Community Health. Credit 3(3-0) 

An introductory study of environmental factors which affect health. 
Emphasis will be placed upon the health of the group rather than that of 
the individual. Consumer health, community resources for health, and pre- 
vention and control of disease through organized community efforts will 
be stressed. 

Suggested Progrom for Health and Physical Education Major 
Freshman Year 

Freshman program for School of Education and General Studies. 

Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Education 203 — — 3 

English 210 3 — — 

French, German or Spanish 5 5 — 



164 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



Health Education 234 — — 

Humanities 201, 202, 203 3 3 

Ph. Ed. (Women) 202, 212, 222, 232 4 — 

Phy. Ed. (Women) 204, 214, 224, 242 — 4 

Phy. Ed. (Women) 206, 216, 234 — — 

Phy. Ed. (Men) 336, 334 — 2 

Phy. Ed. 240 — — 

Phy. Ed. (Men) 225, 273, 277 1 1 

Phy. Ed. (Men) 271, 275, 279 1 1 

Psychology 201 — 5 

ROTC 201, 202, 203 2 2 

Zoology 102 — 

15-17 

Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Education 201, 202 3 

Health Education 338, 336 — 

Humanities 204 3 

Phy. Ed. (Women) 371, 333, 373 1 

Phy. Ed. (Women) 372, 374, 376 2 

Phy. Ed. 339 — — 

Phy. Ed. 341 — — 

Phy. Ed. (Men) 331, 332, 333 2 2 

Phy. Ed. (Men) 336, 334 — 2 

Psychology 203, 301, 302 3 3 

Zoology 307, 401 5 5 

16-17 

Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Education 304, 301 3 

Education 401, 402 3 

Health Education 444 3 

Phy. Ed. (Women) 471, 472 1 — 

Phy. Ed. 444, 442 3 — 

Phy. Ed. 448 — — 

Phy. Ed. 449 — — 

Phy. Ed. (Men) 438 2 — 

Electives 3 — 

17-18 13 



17-19 



Winter 
3 
3 

2 
2 



18 



Winter 

3 
10 



19-20 



Spring 



15-16 



Spring 



18 



INTER-DEPARTMENTAL MINOR IN RECREATIONAL LEADERSHIP 

Inter-Departmental programs are designed to meet the needs of those 
students interested in the field of Recreational Leadership. The program 
cuts across departmental lines and utilizes the courses and resources of 
other departments and schools to balance and enrich the experiences for 
recreational minors. 



EDUCATION 

RECREATION MINOR FOR HOME ECONOMICS/AND NURSERY 
EDUCATION MAJORS. The departments of Home Economics and Physical 



School of Education and General Studies 165 

Education cooperate in an inter-departmental minor in Recreation. The 
schedule of courses is designed to meet the needs of individual students who 
desire a background of culture and recreational leadership skills that will 
enable them to enrich their family life or render distinct contributions to 
community projects. 

RECREATION LEADERSHIP MINOR FOR MAJORS IN SOCIOLOGY. 
The departments of Social Science and Physical Education cooperate in an 
inter-departmental minor in Recreation Leadership. The freshman-sophomore 
requirements are approximately the same as for any bachelor degree pro- 
gram in the School of Education and General Studies. In the Junior and 
Senior years, course work is drawn from other departments and schools to 
balance and enrich the student's minor program. 

COURSES FOR WOMEN MAJOR AND MINOR STUDENTS 

333. Lifesaving and Water Safety. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly 233.) 

The teaching of swimming and Life Saving. Skills required for the 
American Red Cross Standard Life Saving Certificate; instruction in desir- 
able methods and techniques for the teaching of swimming and aquatic 
events. Prerequisite: 234 or equivalent. 

340. Elementary School Physical Education. Credit 3(2-2) 

Philosophy, program planning, and methods for teaching children. Obser- 
vation and instruction of children at various grade levels. Experiences in 
simple games, relays, stunts, tumbling, creative rhythms and dance, move- 
ment exploration. 

371. Dance Composition. Credit 1(0-2) 
The rhythmical and musical basis of dance, the elements of dance con- 
struction. Theory and practice of skills involved. 

372. Techniques and Methods in Fall Activities. Credit 2(1-7) 
Theory and practice of field hockey, soccer, archery, and golf. Analysis 

of performance skills, materials, and teaching techniques. Opportunity for 
officiating in girls and womens sports. 

373. Applied Dance. Credit 1(0-2) 
A coordinated course designed to increase skill in technique and the use 

of related art materials. 

374. Techniques and Methods in Indoor Activities. Credit 2(1-7) 
Theory and practice of basketball, volleyball, gymnastics and apparatus, 

and recreational games. Materials, analysis of performance, and teaching 
techniques. Opportunity for obtaining local and national officials rating. 

376. Techniques and Methods in Seasonal Activities. Credit 2(1-7) 

Theory and practice of speedball, softball, tennis, badminton, track and 
field. Materials and teaching techniques, analysis of skills involved. Oppor- 
tunity for obtaining officials ratings. 

471. Advanced Techniques and Methods in Physical 

Education Activities. Credit 1(0-3) 

A course designed to increase skill in technique and the use of related 
materials in the areas of dance, sports, gymnastics, aquatics, fundamentals, 
or marching and conditioning activities. Emphasis is placed upon the de- 
velopment of competency in areas of individual student weakness. 



166 The Agricultural and Technical College 

472. Physical Education Specialization. Credit 1(0-3) 

A continuation of 471. Opportunities for careful exploration in one or two 

areas of special interest through skill development, independent study, field 

experience, and special projects pertinent to the particular area of interest. 

COURSES FOR MEN WHO ARE MAJORING IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

225. Rhythmics. Credit 1(0-5) 

To teach clog, tap, and folk dances characteristic of many countries, in- 
cluding Sweden, Hungary, Austria, Spain, France, Holland, and the United 

States. 

271. Group Games and Football. Credit 1(0-5) 

(Formerly 223.) 

Practice and applied techniques of a large variety of games of lower 
organization of the circle, group and line types which might be suitable 
for playground, gymnasium, camp and for adult gatherings. Concentration 
on developing performance skills and understanding of rules of football. 

273. Basketball, Stunts and Tumbling. Credit 1(0-5) 

(Formerly 226.) 
To develop performance skills and understanding of rules of basketball; 
concentrated practice in techniques and skills of stunts and tumbling. 

275. Swimming, Track and Field. Credit 1(0-5) 

(Formerly 227.) 
To develop basic aquatic skills including the crawl, side stroke, treading, 
floating, and diving; to develop performance skills and techniques in track 
and field. 

277. Individual Sports. Credit 1(0-5) 

(Formerly 228.) 
To develop performance skills in a wide variety of individual sports in- 
cluding shuffleboard, handball, table tennis, badminton, croquet, archery, 
golf, and tennis. 

279. Combatives and Baseball. Credit 1(0-5) 

(Formerly 229.) 
To develop performance skills in a wide range of dual, group and team 
combatives and running exercises; concentration on developing perform- 
ance skills and understanding of rules of baseball. 

331. The Teaching of Football, Soccer and Speedball. Credit 2(1-2) 
(Formerly 231.) 

Consideration is given to the teaching of history, rules, performance 
skills, methods of organizing practices, strategy, team offenses and defenses, 
and various formations for the three sports. 

332. The teaching of Basketball, Stunts and Tumbling. Credit 2(1-2) 
(Formerly 232 and 235.) 

Consideration is given to the teaching of history, rules, performance 
skills, individual and team offense and defense in basketball; methods and 
techniques for teaching stunts and tumbling. 

333. Teaching of Swimming, and Life Saving. Credit 2(1-2) 
(Formerly 233.) 

Skills required for the American Red Cross standard Life Saving cer- 
tificate; instruction in desirable methods and techniques for the teaching 
of swimming and aquatic events. Prerequisites: 131 or equivalent. 



School of Education and General Studies 167 

334. Teaching of Baseball, Track and Field. Credit 2(1-2) 

(Formerly 234.) 
Consideration is given to the teaching of history and development of 
each sport, the performance skills, individual and team offenses and de- 
fenses, strategy, and rules in baseball, and to the team and individual events 
of track. 

336. The Teaching of Individual Sports. Credit 2(1-2) 

(Formerly 236.) 
Methods and techniques for teaching individual sports including shuffle- 
board, handball, golf, table tennis, badminton, archery, and tennis. 

438. The Teaching of Net Games. Credit 2(1-2) 

(Formerly 238.) 
Methods of teaching a variety of net games, including volleyball, New- 
comb, Badminton, tennis, handball, and deck tennis. 

COURSES FOR MEN AND WOMEN STUDENTS MAJORING 
IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

240. Introduction to Physical Education. Credit 2(2-0) 

Survey of the nature and scope of physical education; interpretation 
Survey of the nature and scope of physical education; interpretation of 
objectives and philosophy of physical education as a part of the total educa- 
tional program. Qualifications, responsibilities, and opportunities of pro- 
fessional personnel. Evaluation of personal fitness and suitability to area 
of interest. 

339. History and Principles of Physical Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 239.) 
The evolution of physical education from the earliest time to the present 
day. Consideration of the relationship of physical education to education 
and to national life and ideals through the different historical periods. A 
critical analysis of the scientific basis for physical education with applica- 
tions of the aims and objectives to the modern concepts of education. 

341. Kinesiology. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 241.) 
A study of the bodily movements, types of muscular exercise and their 
relation to the problems of body development. 

442. Community Recreation. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 242.) 

A study of city, state, and national organizations. Practice in the general 
principles and techniques in the organization and promotion of leisure 
activities for home, school and community. 

443. The Teaching of Physical Education. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 243.) 

Same as Education 304. 

444. Adapted Physical Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 244.) 

Methods of examining and determining needs of the handicapped; activi- 
ties suitable for individuals with abnormal body conditions, and the conduct 
of a program of restricted activities to meet their needs. 

447. Minor Problems in Health Education and Physical Education. 

(Formerly 247.) Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed primarily for seniors to provide them with an 
opportunity to investigate selected professional problems. 



168 The Agricultural and Technical College 

448. Problems in Physical Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 248.) 

Special administrative problems in the organization of physical education 
programs and the coordination of its different phases pertinent to men and 
women of professional preparation. Current problems of physical education, 
including curriculum construction in the light of historical backgrounds, 
intramural activities, girls' athletics, athletic insurance, and athletic asso- 
ciations. 

449. The Organization and Administration of Health 

and Physical Education. Credit 5(5-0) 

(Formerly 249.) 
Philosophy and policies in the administration of/a health and physical 
education program, including the classification of students, the staff, teach- 
ing load, time schedule, finance, the gymnasium, locker-rooms, equipment, 
and inter-scholastic athletics. Prerequisites: 339 and permission of advisor. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENTS 

501. Current Problems and Trends in Physical Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
A practical course for experienced teachers. Consideration given to in- 
dividual problems in physical education with analysis of present trends. 

504. Administration of Interscholastic and 

Intra-Mural Athletics. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the relation of athletics to education, and the problems of 

finance, facilities, scheduling, eligibility, and insurance. Consideration given 

to the organization and administration of intra-mural activities in the 

school program. 

505. Community Recreation. Credit 3(3-0) 
A study of the recreational facilities and problems with consideration be- 
ing given to the promotion of effective recreational program in rural and 
urban communities. 

506. Current Theories and Practices of Teaching Sports. Credit 3(3-0) 
Methodology and practice at various skill levels. Emphasi placed on 

seasonal activity. 

HEALTH EDUCATION COURSES 

336. Advanced Hygiene and Principles of Health Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 236.) 
A comprehensive review of health facts and scientific principles applicable 
to the prospective teacher, the school child, and the community. Fundamen- 
tals of health promotion in the school program are considered. 

338. First Aid, Safety and Prevention of Injuries. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 238.) 
Techniques of first aid to the injured in the home, school and community 
and the teaching of safety measures to be practiced in daily living; the 
prevention and care of injuries occurring in physical education classes and 
competitive sports. The standard Red Cross First Aid Certificate is awarded 
upon successful completion of the course. 

444. The Teaching of Health Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 244.) 
Methods, materials, and procedures for the teaching of health in the 
elementary and secondary schools. Prerequisites: H.E. 234 and 338. 



School of Education and General Studies 169 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

502. Personal, School, and Community Health Problems. Credit 3(3-0) 
A study of personal, school and community health problems and resources. 

Emphasis placed on the control of communicable diseases, healthful school 
living and the development in individuals of the scientific attitude and a 
positive philosophy of healthful living. 

503. Methods and Materials in Health Education for 

Elementary and Secondary Teachers. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the fundamentals of the school health program, pupil needs, 

methods, planning instruction, teaching techniques, selection and evaluation 

of materials for the elementary and secondary programs, and the use of the 

community resources. 



DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Virgil C. Stroud, Acting Chairman 



In keeping with the general objectives of the College, the offerings of 
this department are designed to provide students with a cultural and 
humanistic preparation in the Social Sciences, to insure students a proper 
groundwork on which to build advanced technical and professional courses, 
and to stimulate those qualities and characteristics from which come intel- 
lectual vigor, broad human sympathy and constructive imagination. 

THE SOCIAL SCIENCES 

The Social Sciences at the Agricultural and Technical College of North 
Carolina include Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, and 
Sociology. 

THE MAJORS IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Students may secure majors in three specific areas of the Social Sciences: 
(1) History, (2) Social Studies, and (3) Sociology. 

The major in History is designed to meet the needs of students wishing 
to teach History in the junior or senior high school, and those desiring to 
pursue further study in this field. However, a student who intends to major 
in the area for the specific purpose of teaching must declare his intentions 
at the beginning of his junior year. 

The Social Studies curriculum is specifically designed to prepare students 
for the teaching of History and/ or any combination of the Social Sciences 
listed above, in the Junior and /or senior high school. 

The Sociology curriculum is designed to meet the needs of students who 
are interested in social welfare, labor relations, government service, per- 



* Social Science 101, 102, and 103 are required of all freshmen students as well as Hu- 
manities 200, 210 and 220. These offerings are not to be considered a part of the major 
requirements. 



170 The Agricultural and Technical College 

sonnel administration, industrial relations, public relations and kindered 
vocations, as well as preparing students for graduate work, teaching ca- 
reers, and related professional work. 

A major in any of the Social Science areas requires a minimum of 45 
quarter hours. 

COURSES IN ANTHROPOLOGY 

Undergraduate 

201. Introduction to Anthropology. Credit 3(3-0) 

An introduction to the science of anthropology. The nature of man, 
social anthropology and cultural anthropology will be considered as factors 
in man's adjustment to his physical, social and cultural environments. 

401. Cultural Anthropology. Credit 3(3-0) 

Special emphasis upon acculturation. Description and historical review 
of contacts of societies with different cultural traditions; analysis of inter- 
action and resulting interpretation of cultures. 

COURSES IN ECONOMICS 

Undergraduate 

310. Principles of Economics. Credit 5(5-0) 

This course surveys the general field of Economics, Prerequisite to all 
other courses in Economics. 

312. Economic Problems. Credit 5(5-0) 

This course gives detailed consideration to major areas in modern eco- 
nomic life. The implications of public ownership, monopoly, organized labor 
and business combinations are stressed. Prerequisite: Economics 310 or 
consent of instructor. 

320. Consumer Economics. Credit 3(3-0) 

A course showing the importance of the consumer in the American 
economy, especially as a force for economic betterment; consumer problems 
of individuals are also discussed. 

330. Statistical Methods in Social Science. Credit 5(5-0) 

An introduction to research methods; social statistics; analysis of methods 
used by social scientists. 

334. Industrial Economic Analysis. Credit 3(3-0) 

Problems relating to the engineer's role as consultant on matters of in- 
vestment and operations. Cost concepts, profit-volume relationships and 
analysis, treatment of make or buy decisions, renewal or replacement 
decisions, minimum cost problems, simple linear programming models. 
Prerequisites: Econ. 310, Math. 222, M.E. 205. 

410. Labor Problems. Credit 5(5-0) 

An introductory course dealing with the efforts of working people to 
improve their relative position in the economy; the influence of unionism and 
of governmental participation are emphasized. 

420. Money and Banking. Credit 5(5-0) 

A general survey of the role of banking in the economy; the nature of 
money and international exchange. 



School of Education and General Studies 171 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

501. Economic Understanding. Credit 3(3-0) 

An analysis of the institutional organization and functions of the Ameri- 
can economy. Special references will be made to the state of North Carolina. 

Graduate 

These courses are open only to graduate students. For descriptions of 
them, see the bulletin of the Graduate School. 

601. Labor and Industrial Relations. Credit 3(3-0) 

602. Government Economic Problems. Credit 3(3 0) 

COURSES IN GEOGRAPHY 

Undergraduate 

310. Principles of Geography. Credit 5(5-9) 

A survey of the principles of geography. 

320. Regional Geography of Anglo- America. Credit 5(5-0) 

A study of the geographic regions of the United States and Canada. 

330. Resources and Industries of the United States. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the physical resources of the United States and its possessions. 

410. Economic Geography of Latin America. Credit 3(3-0) 

The agricultural and industrial resources of Latin America, including the 
utilization of Negro labor, and the assimilation of African culture into 
Latin- American life. 

420. Political Geography. Credit 3(3-0) 

Theories of political geography; territorial changes and their political 
significance; problems in political unification; centralization and federation. 
Prerequisite: Political Science 211 or 310. 

Graduate 

These courses are open only to graduate students. For descriptions of 
them, see the bulletin on the Graduate School. 

601. The Physical Universe. Credit 3(3-0) 

602. Geology. Credit 3(3-0) 

603. Geography of North America. Credit 3(3-0) 

604. Conservation of Natural Resources. Credit 3(3-0) 

COURSES IN HISTORY 
Undergraduate 
210. History of Civilization. Credit 5(5-0) 

A general course surveying the main trends in history of western civiliza- 
tion. 

220. History of the Negro. Credit 5(5-0) 

This course includes a brief survey of the African background of the 
Negro, traces him from Africa to America; includes a study of his enslave- 
ment, with special emphasis on slavery in America, the Free Negro before 
1860, abolition, and the Civil War with special emphasis on the part played 
by Negro troops, achievements since 1865, and forces in Negro progress. 



172 The Agricultural and Technical College 

230. United States History From 1492 to 1860. Credit 5(5-0) 

A survey of the social, political and economic forces resulting in the de- 
veloping of the American Nation. 

238. History of North Carolina. Credit 3(3-0) 

A general survey of North Carolina from colonial times to the present. 

310. United States History From 1860 to 1957. Credit 5(5-0) 

A survey and synthesis of economic, social and political forces affecting 
the American Nation during this period, emphasizing the rise and effects of 
large scale industry and the emergence of the nation as a great power. 

312. History of Reconstruction. Credit 3(3-0) 

The period from 1860 to 1877. The industrial and agricultural develop- 
ment, constitutional problems, the participation of the freedom in recon- 
struction and the political issues of the period are studied thoroughly. 
Prerequisites: Hist. 230 and 310. 

320. Modern Europe. Credit 5(5-0) 

A survey course dealing with major factors and movements in the history 

of modern Europe, growth of democracy and the expansion of Europe from 

1815 to present. Lectures, collateral reading, special reports and map work. 

330. Medieval History. Credit 5(5-0) 

A history of Europe in the middle ages. Prerequisite: 15 hours of history. 

332. History of England. Credit 5(5-0) 

A survey of the social and political development of England in the 16th, 
17th, and 18th centuries. 

336. Contemporary Russian History. Credit 3(3-0)* 

A comprehensive treatment of the History of Russia since 1917: Pre- 
requisite: History 320. 

410. American Constitutional History. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the constitutional development of the United States from the 
adoption of the constitution to the present time. 

412. Contemporary American History. Credit 3(3-0) 

An intensiye study and analysis of important problems in American 

history since 1928. Emphasis is on methods of historical research and 
writing. 

420. History of Latin America. Credit 3(3-0)* 

A study of the rise and development of the Latin-American nations. 
Prerequisite: 15 hours of history or consent of instructor. 

422. History of Eastern Europe. Credit 3(3-0)* 

A general course in the history of Eastern Europe and the Balkins. 

424. History of the Far East. Credit 3(3-0)* 

A survey of the economic and political development of the far eastern 
countries with emphasis on the twentieth century. Prerequisite: 15 hours of 
history. 



* Offered in Alternate years. Next offering: 1964-1965. 



School of Education and General Studies 173 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

*501. The British Colonies and the American Revolution. Credit 3(3-0) 
The evolution of colonial institutions, growth of the American colonies, 
the American Revolution and its aftermath. 

503. Economic History of the United States, 1787-1865. Credit 3(3-0) 
A study of pre-industrial America with special emphasis on agriculture, 

banking and industry, commerce, and transportation. 

504. Economic History of the United States Since 1865. Credit 3(3-0) 
A treatment of the American economy in the industrial capitalism, 

financial capitalism, business organization and the relationship between 
government and business. 

*505. History of Nineteenth Century Europe. Credit 3(3-0) 

A treatment of the history of Europe between the Congress of Vienna 
and the outbreak of World War I. Special attention is given to the develop- 
ment of ideologies such as liberalism, nationalism, and socialism. Due atten- 
tion is also given to colonial expansion, economic growth, scientific progress 
and international conflict. 

506. Europe Since 1914. Credit 3(3-0) 

An account of Europe's history in the twentieth century. Special con- 
sideration is given to attempts at reconstruction, 1919 to 1939, the conflict 
of ideologies, World War II, and the issues and crises between East and 
West. 

Graduate 

These courses are open only to graduate students. For descriptions of 
them, see the bulletin of the Graduate School. 

602. The French Revolution and Napoleon. Credit 3(3-0) 

605. Recent United States Diplomatic History. Credit 3(3-0) 

606. Social and Political History of England 

from 1714 to 1832. Credit 3(3-0) 

607. Reconstruction, 1865-1877. Credit 3(3-0) 

608. United States in the Twentieth Century. Credit 3(3-0) 
610. The Soviet Union Since 1917. Credit 3(3-0) 

612. Contemporary History of the United States. Credit 3(3-0) 

613. Research in Social Science. Credit 3(3-0) 

COURSES IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 
Undergraduate 
211. Introduction to American Government. Credit 3(3-0) 

A treatment of the historical development and organization of the na- 
tional government. 

310. Federal Government. Credit 5(5-0) 

A general introductory course in the government of the United States 
designed to acquaint the student with the basic facts and principles of the 
organization and operation of Federal institutions, and to give a foundation 
for more advanced work in Political Science. Prerequisite: 15 hours of Social 
Science or consent of instructor. 



* Offered in alternate years. Next offering : 1963-64. 



174 The Agricultural and Technical College 

320. State Government. Credit 5(5-0) 

A study of the structure and functions of state government in the United 
States and its relation to Federal and local governments. Prerequisite: 15 
hours of Social Science or consent of instructor. 

322. Municipal Government. Credit 3(3-0) 

An intensive study of the structure and problems of all areas of local 
government in the United States. 

410. Party Politics and Pressure Groups. Credit 3(3-0)* 

This course deals with modern political parties in the United States as 
instruments of popular government. An analysis is made of the role of 
parties in the formation of public opinion and its influence upon govern- 
mental action. 

422. Current International Relations. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the relations among nations of the World since World War II. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

501. The Federal Government. Credit 3(3-0) 
A comprehensive treatment of American Federal Government. Basic 

elements, principles and philosophies are reviewed, as are the roles of the 
branches of the Government. Emphasis will be placed on the growth and 
impact of political institutions and ideas on the process of Government. 
Intensive readings, written and oral reports are required. 

502. State and Local Governments. Credit 3(3-0) 
An intensive study of state governments of the United States. Emphasis 

will be placed on constitution, structure and function, finance and personnel, 
judiciary and law enforcement, organization and conduct of administrative 
programs, State relations with local government, and contemporary prob- 
lems. Intensive readings and oral reports required. 

506. Research and Current Problems. Credit 3(3-0) 

Considered are: Fundamental concepts of Scientific Method of research; 
Effective research procedures; techniques and sources used in research and 
government; investigation of some current and recurrent problems inherent 
in Federalism and "States Rights"; individualism and collective action, 
free interprise and governmental regulations. 

Graduate 

These courses are open only to graduate students. For descriptions of 
them, see the bulletin of the Graduate School. 
603. Government Finances. Credit 3(3-0) 

COURSES IN SOCIOLOGY 
Undergraduate 

231. Principles of Sociology. Credit 5(5-0; 
Examination of the basic concepts and principles of sociology with 

emphasis on scientific analysis of culture, social organization and per- 
sonality. Prerequisite to all other courses in Sociology. 

232. Principles of Sociology. Credit 5(5-0) 
Continuation of Sociology 231. Analysis and explanation of social groups 

and groupings, social stratification, social institutions, population trends, 
social processes. Required of all Sociology majors. 

* Offered in alternate years. Next offering : 1963-64. 



School of Education and General Studies 175 

233. Introduction to Social Work. Credit 3(3-0) 
An introductory course dealing with the various areas, processes and 

functions of social work. The various services and resources which the com- 
munity provides for the social welfare of its citizens and or which the 
social worker makes use in the practice of his profession. Also the philosophy 
and history of social welfare. 

234. Social Disorganization. Credit 3(3-0) 
A study of the collapse, stability or modification of various social institu- 
tions in a society in transition, and the impact of social change upon 
human personality and human groups. The role of social disorganization 
processes in social pathology, social change, and social progress. Offered 
in alternate years. 

235. Urban Sociology. Credit 3(3-0) 

The interplay of demographic, ecological and cultural themes; emergence 
and structure-function of social organization and cultural foci in the city. 
Anomie, loneliness-in-the-crowd; depersonalization and individuality will be 
considered in the phenomenon or urbanization. Prerequisite: Sociology 231, 
232. 

331. Marriage and the Family. Credit 3(3-0) 
A brief history of the various types of families with special attention 

to the monogamous family; marriage problems and family living; per- 
sonality; courtship; family budgeting, divorce, planned parenthood. Open 
to non-sociology majors who have had social science 101, 102, and 103. 

332. Minority Groups. Credit 3(3-0) 
An examination of the composition, status, and relations of racial and 

ethnic groups in the United States and in the world. 

333. Social Psychology. Credit 3(3-0) 

Study of the development of human nature and personality, processes of 
group life, and collective behavior. Focuses upon the individual within the 
context of society. 

324. Sociological Theory. Credit 3(3-0) 

Chronological treatment of social theorists from Comte to the present 
day. The purpose of this course is to give the student a comprehensive 
background and a perspective for understanding the social thought of his 
own time. 

335. Sociology of Underdeveloped Areas. Credit 3(3-0) 
A study of the social processes in areas that have not kept abreast of 

the advancements in scientific and technological progress. Specific areas will 
be selected for careful investigation. Offered in alternate years. 

336. Sociology of Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
The structure of educational institutions as it is affected by society. 

Teacher, parents, children and officials and their interrelationships will be 
considered in the light of the power structure of education systems. 

337. Introduction to Sociological Research. Credit 3(3-0) 
Delineation of a research problem in sociology; surveys and uses of avail- 
able sources of data; consideration of sampling procedures of sociological 
research; field methods of collecting original data; graphic presentation 
of statistical date. Prerequisite: Sociology 231, 232, 235, 234; Economics 
330. 



176 The Agricultural and Technical College 

431. Readings in Sociology. Credit 3(3-0) 
This is a reading course designed to help students satisfy requirements in 

specific areas of the field of sociology. By arrangement with the instructor, 
credit may be applied where deficiencies occur. Prerequisite 15 hours of 
sociology. 

432. Industrial Sociology. Credit 3(3-0) 
The sociology of industry; labor-management relations; Governmental 

regulation of industrial relations; the role of unions; power structure and 
power distribution; the organization man; and the industrial society are 
some of the topics to be considered in detail. Prerequisite 15 hours of 
sociology. 

433. Techniques in Human Relations. Credit 3(3-0) 
Consideration of various methods are employed in an effort to solve human 

problems. How groups react in specific social situations; accommodation, 
compromise and protest through legal, religious, civic and social organiza- 
tions. Prerequisite, 15 hours of sociology. 

434. Community Organization. Credit 3(3-0) 
The application of sociology to practical problems of community organiza- 
tion. The use of community organizations as a tool for guiding changes, 
and as stabilizing influences in the established social order; an analysis of 
community work through various organizations, both formal and informal. 
Prerequisite: Sociology 231, 232, 233. 

435. Social Stratification. Credit 3(3-0) 
An investigation and analysis of the social differentiation between men 

and groups of men; the origin, nature and development of social stratifica- 
tion. Specific attention will be given to such topics as social mobility, social 
class, castes, estates and families as they are influenced by heredity, wealth, 
power, authority, position, race and "social mobility." Prerequisite 15 hours 
of sociology. 

437. Social Institutions. Credit 3(3-0) 

Analytical changes in human society from simpler people and tribal 
societies; the development and growth of the state, the emergence of law, 
and regulative organizations; the typical life cycle of institutions. Pre- 
requisite 15 hours of sociology. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

500. Crime and Delinquency. Credit 5(5-0) 
Nature and development of crime and delinquency; theories and research 

in the etiology of juvenile delinquency and criminal behavior; the treatment 
of offenders; rehabilitation programs. Open to seniors by permission. 

501. Socialization and Culture. Credit 3(3-0) 
A comparison of ethnographic and other research materials in the fields 

of psychology, sociology and anthropology on child rearing, personality 
development, and the learning of social roles. Examination of hypotheses 
relating early experiences to cultural behavior. Structure and ideological 
determinants of childhood experiences. Open to seniors by permission. 

502. Current Economic and Social Problems. Credit 3(3-0) 
A practical course in applied economics and sociology dealing with 

analysis of present trends in government, economics, industry, agriculture 
and the social implications of these trends. Open to seniors by permission. 



School of Education and General Studies 177 

503. History of Social Thought. Credit 3(3-0) 

Treatment of social thought from early Greeks to the twentieth century; 
treats thought in terms of periods such as pre-Christian, Christian, Middle 
Ages and Rennaisance. 

505. Advanced Readings in American Sociology. Credit 3(3-0) 
This course is designed to give special attention to American scholars in 

the area of sociology. Open to seniors by permission. 

506. Population Problems. Credit 3(3-0) 

Introduction to various phases of population study; special attention 
will be given to the population explosion and problems created by mankind- 
in-motion; various theories of population growth will be considered. Open 
to seniors by permission. 

Graduate 

These courses are open only to graduate students. For descriptions of 
them, see the bulletin of the Graduate School. 

600. Theories of Human Development and Interaction. Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is open to graduate students who are majoring in sociology 
with a view to earning a graduate degree in sociology. Enrollment by per- 
mission. 

607. Race and Ethnic Relations. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of race relations in America with specific emphasis upon the 
Negro in American society; a comparative analysis of human relations in 
America with those in selected countries. 

INTER-DEPARTMENTAL MINOR IN RECREATION LEADERSHIP 

Inter-departmental programs are designed to meet the needs of those 
students interested in the field of Recreational Leadership. The program 
cuts across departmental lines and utilizes the courses and resources of 
other departments and schools to balance and enrich the experiences for 
recreation minors. 

Recreation Leadership Minor for Majors for Sociology. The department 
of Sociology and Physical Education cooperate in an inter-departmental 
minor in Recreational Leadership. The freshman-sophomore requirements 
are approximately the same as for any bachelor degree program in the 
School of Education and General Studies. In the Junior and Senior years, 
course work is drawn from other departments and schools to balance and 
enrich the student's minor program. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE SERIES 

Social Science 101 — World Civilization and Culture 

Social Science 102 — Man and His Social Institutions 

Social Science 103 — Contemporary Social, Economic and Political Problems 

Social Science 101, 102, 103 Nine credit hours 

A study of the group life of man beginning with the original nature of 
man and tracing the processes of socialization and acculturation by which 



178 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



he acquires human nature. Emphasis is placed upon the numerous 
processes of human interaction and group interrelatedness, while the tra- 
ditional division of social science into such special disciplines as history, 
anthropology, sociology, economics and political science is maintained. Re- 
quired of all freshmen enrolled in a baccalaureate program. 

MAJOR IN HISTORY 
Freshman Year 

Freshman Program of School of Education and General Studies 

Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Foreign Language 101, 102, 103 5 5 5 

History 210, 220, 230 5 5 5 

History 238 3 — — 

Humanities 201, 202, 203 3 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 1 

ROTC (Men) 221, 222, 223 2 2 2 

Sociology 231, 232 — 5 5 

19 21 21 
Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

History 310, 312, 320 5 5 5 

History 330, 332 5 5 — 

Humanities 204 3 — — 

Economics 320 — 3 — 

Education 201, 202 — 3 3 

Psychology 203, 301 — — 6 

Minor 6-8 3-6 — 

19-21 17-20 19 
Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

History 410, 420 3 3 — 

Geography 420 — 3 — 

Education 501 3 — — 

or 

Psychology 302 — 3 — 

Education 301, 307, 402 — — 13 

Minor 9-12 7-9 — 

Electives 3 3 — 

18-21 19-21 13 



MAJOR IN SOCIAL STUDIES 
Freshman Year 

Freshman Program of School of Education and General Studies 

Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Education 201 3 — — 

Foreign Language 101, 102, 103 5 5 5 



School of Education and General Studies 



179 



History 210, 220, 230 5 

Humanities 201, 202, 203 3 

Physical Education 1 

ROTC (Men) 2 

Sociology 231, 232 — 

19 

Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Economics 310, 312 5 

Education 202 — 

Geography 310, 320 5 

History 330, 332 5 

Humanities 204 3 

Political Science 310, 320 5 

Psychology 203, 301 — 

Sociology 332 — 

Minor — 



Senior Year 

Course and No. 

Education 501 or Psychology 302 

Education 301, 307, 402 

History 420 

Minor 12 

Electives 3 



5 
3 
1 
2 
5 

21 



Winter 
5 

5 
5 



5 
3 

1 
2 
5 

21 



Spring 
3 



18-20 
Fall 


20 

Winter 
3-3 

12 
3-6 


20 

Spring 


. 


13 


. 3 




. 12 





. 3-6 










18-21 



18-21 



13 



MAJOR IN SOCIAL WELFARE 

Freshman Year 

Freshman Program of School of Education and General Studies 

Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Foreign Language 101, 102, 102 5 5 5 

Humanities 201, 202, 203 3 3 3 

Psychology 201, 303, 304 5 5 5 

Sociology 231, 232, 234 5 5 3 

Sociology 235, 233 3 — 5 

Physical Education 1 1 1 

ROTC (Men) 2 2 2 



18-21 

Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Economics 310, 312, 320 5 

Economics 330 — 

Humanities 204 3 

Sociology 332, 331 — 

Sociology 333, 334, 336 3 

Sociology 337 3 

Minor 6 

Electives — 



18-21 


18-21 


Winter 
5 
5 


Spring 
3 


3 
3 


3 
3 


3 


6 
3 



20 



19 



18 



180 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Sociology 432, 433, 434 — 

Sociology 435, 436, 437 3 

Sociology 500, 501, 502 5 

Sociology 506, 434 3 

Minor 6 

Electives — 

20 



Winter 
3 
3 
3 

9 
3 

21 



Spring 
3 
3 
3 
3 
6 
3 

21 



MAJOR IN SOCIOLOGY 
Freshman Year 

Freshman Program of School of Education and General Studies 



Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Foreign Language 101, 102, 103 5 

Humanities 201, 202, 203 3 

Physical Education 1 

ROTC (Men) 2 

Sociology 231, 232 — 

Sociology 235, 234 3 

Psychology 201, 303, 304 5 

19 



Winter 
5 
3 
1 
2 
5 



Spring 
5 
3 
1 
2 
5 
3 
5 



18-21 



18-21 



Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Economics 310, 312, 320 5 

Economics 330 — 

Humanities 204 3 

Sociology 332, 331 — 

Sociology 333, 334, 336 3 

Sociology 337 3 

Minor 6 

Electives — 

20 

Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Sociology 431, 432, 433 3 

Sociology 435, 436, 437 3 

Sociology 500, 501, 507 5 

Economics 410 — 

Minor 6 

Electives 3 

20 



Winter 


Spring 


5 


3 


5 


— 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


6 


— 


3 


19 


18 


Winter 


Spring 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


— 


6 


6 


— 


3 



18 



18 



School of Education and General Studies 181 

MINORS 

Students majoring in the various areas of the Social Sciences are required 
to also effect a Minor which consists of a minimum of 38 quarter hours. 
The Social Science area itself offers minors in all three areas in which 
majors are offered. It is suggested that students majoring in Sociology 
choose a minor in a closely related field. Other suggested areas for minors 
include: English, Biology, a Language, and Psychology. 

Requirements for the History Minor 

History 210—5 hrs. History 332—5 hrs. 

History 220—5 hrs. History 420—3 hrs. 

History 230—5 hrs. History 238—3 hrs. 

History 320—5 hrs. 

Requirements for the Social Studies Minor 

History 210—5 hrs. Sociology 320—5 hrs. 

History 220 — 5 hrs. Economics 310 — 5 hrs. 

History 230—5 hrs. Political Science 310 — 5 hrs. 

History 320—5 hrs. Sociology 334—3 hrs. 

Requirements for the Sociology Minor 

Sociology 320—5 hrs. Sociology 330 — 3 hrs. 

Sociology 321—5 hrs. Sociology 334 — 3 hrs. 

Sociology 420 — 5 hrs. Sociology 436 — 3 hrs. 

Sociology 410 — 5 hrs. Psychology 200 — 5 hrs. 






SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 





r™ * ... % E 



Department of Architectural Engineering 

Department of Art 

Department of Business 

Department of Electrical Engineering 

Department of Industrial Education 

Department of Mathematics 

Department of Mechanical Engineering 

Department of Physics 



School of Engineering 185 

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

J. M. Marteena, Dean 



The School of Engineering includes, the Departments of Architectural 
Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Engineering 
Mathematics, Engineering Physics. Business, Fine Arts, and Industrial 
Education. This organization enables the school to offer vocational, scientific 
and engineering instruction to help prepare students to meet the needs of 
the people, of industry and of the various technical and professional fields. 

The curricula offered include four-year courses of study leading to the 
Bachelor of Science degree as well as professional courses required by the 
State Department of Public Instructions for the teaching certificate in 
many fields. 

To keep pace with the increasing demands of industry, society and pro- 
gressive education, the school is rapidly improving its staff and expanding 
its facilities and physical plant. 

ADMISSION TO THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

The admission requirements are generally the same as those given for 
entrance to the freshman class. One and one-half years of algebra, one year 
of plane geometry and one-half year of solid geometry are required for stu- 
dents electing a curriculum leading to a B.S. degree in engineering, mathe- 
matics and physics. Students admitted with conditions in any subjects will 
be required to remove them during their freshman year. 

ADVANCED STANDING 

Students who have attended a college of approved standing will be given 
appropriate credit for work completed there, upon the presentation of the 
proper certificate to the Registrar, who will determine the credits which are 
transferable toward the curriculum which the student wishes to follow. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The requirements for graduation in any division of the School of Engi- 
neering are the same as the General Graduating Eequirements. 

OUTLINE OF THE FIRST YEAR'S WORK OF ALL 
FOUR-YEAR CURRICULA IN ENGINEERING 

In order to permit all students in the School of Engineering to find out 
definitely what courses they desire to pursue, the first year of all four-year 
curricula in engineering or industrial arts is made uniform. 

An inspection trip to visit such industrial installations as a hydroelectric 
plant, a turbo-electric plant, a steel or aluminum manufacturing and f abrica- 



186 The Agricultural and Technical College 

tion plant, outstanding construction projects, etc., will be required for grad- 
uation in all curricula of engineering. 

The inspection trip will be planned by the heads of the various depart- 
ments of engineering for senior students and will take place during the 
Spring quarter of each year. 

A special fee will be charged all senior students in engineering to cover 
expenses for this trip. See fees and expenses. 

Freshman Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Chemistry 101, 102, 103 5 5 5 

Mathematics 111, 112. 113 5 5 5 

English 101, 102, 103 5 5 5 

Engineering Graphics, M. E. 101, 102 3 3 — 

Descriptive Geometry, M. E. 103 — — 3 

Electives** 1 1 1 

19 19 19 



DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING 

William A. Streat, Chairman 



The objective of the curriculum in Architectural Engineering is to pro- 
vide sound basic training in the engineering design and construction of 
buildings. A considerable portion of the program is devoted to fundamental 
and applied science and to selected courses in the humanities. Study is de- 
voted to all forms of building construction with major emphasis placed on 
the structural and mechanical aspects of architecture. Sufficient work in 
architectural design, art, and architectural history is required so that the 
student acquires basic knowledge of the utilitarian phases of planning. The 
four-year curriculum provides an integrated educational experience and 
leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Architectural Engineering. 

Program for Architectural Engineering Major 
Freshman Year 

(See First Year's Curricula in Engineering.) 

Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Freehand Drawing, Art 111, 113 3 — 3 

Humanities, Elective — 3 — 

General Physics 201, 202, 203 5 5 5 

Mathematics 221, 222, 223 5 5 5 

Arch. Elements, A.E. 221 4 — — 

Arch. Design, A.E. 222, 223 — 4 4 

Engineering Problems, M.E. 200 — 2 — 

Electives* 2 2 2 

19 21 19 

* Freshman aiid sophomore male students who are not veterans are required to enroll 
in military or air science each quarter of the freshman and sophomore years. 

** Freshman and sophomore male students who are not veterans are required to enroll 
in military or air science each quarter of their freshman and sophomore years. 

NOTE : ROTC students registered in certain designated courses may be required to take 
only the drill in some of the ROTC courses. 



School of Engineering 



187 



Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Mechanics, M.E. 311, 312, 313 5 5 5 

Arch. Design, A.E. 331, 332, 333 4 4 4 

History of Arch., A.E. 325, 326, 327 3 3 3 

Materials and Methods of 

Construction, A.E. 334, 335, 336 3 3 3 

Structural Elements, A.E. 337 — 2 — 

Theory of Structures, A.E. 338 — — 2 

Electives 3 3 3 

18 20 20 

Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Theory of Structures, A.E. 441, 442 5 5 — 

Reinforced Concrete Theory, A.E. 451 3 — — 

Structural Design, A.E. 443 — — 5 

Reinforced Concrete Design, A.E. 452 — 3 — 

Plane Surveying, M.E. 220 — — 3 

Heating and Ventilating, M.E. 315, 316 3 3 — 

Testing Materials, M.E. 429 2 — — 

Elec. Equip, of Bldgs., A.E. 444 3 — — 

Building Sanitation, A.E. 449 — — 3 

Economics 334 — 3 5 

Professional Practice, A.E. 446 2 — — 

Electives 3 5 3 

Inspection Trip — — 

21 19 19 



COURSES IN ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING 
Undergraduate 

221. Architectural Elements. Credit 4(0-8) 
Fundamentals of architectural planning and design. Principles of plan, 

elevation, and section. Principles of architectural perspectives, shades and 
shadows. Prerequisite: M.E. 103. 

222. Architectural Design. Credit 4(0-8) 
Problems in the design of small buildings with exercises in space organi- 
zation and the study of architectural composition. Prerequisite: 221. 

223. Architectural Design. Credit 4(0-8) 
Space organization of building requirements, with study of environmental 

influences including the influences of climate and topography. Prerequisite: 
A.E. 222. 

325. History of Architecture. Credit 3(3-0) 
The early architecture and civilizations of Egypt, Western Asia, Greece, 

and Rome, including architectural developments by the Early Christians 
and Byzantine builders. Prerequisite: A.E. 223. 

326. History of Architecture. Credit 3(3-0) 
The architecture and civilization of Medieval Europe. Prerequisite: A.E. 

325. 



188 The Agricultural and Technical College 

327. History of Architecture. Credit 3(3-0) 
Architecture and civilization of Renaissance Europe, Early American 

architecture and civilization and study of selected examples of architecture 
in the Americas and Europe after A.D. 1800. Prerequisite: A.E. 326. 

328. History of Architecture. Credit 3(3-0) 
An analytical study of Contemporary Architecture. Prerequisite: A.E. 327. 

(Open to art majors through consent of the instructor. 

331. Architectural Design. Credit 4(0-8) 
Principles of space analysis, orientation and site planning, exercises in 

space organization of building requirements and the integration of space 
design with building construction. Development of scale models. Prerequisite: 
A.E. 223. 

332. Architectural Design. Credit 4(0-8) 
Problems in space organization, design, and circulation; group planning. 

Principles which govern the choice of materials, and the organization of 
structural components. Prerequisite: A.E. 331. 

333. Architectural Design. Credit 4(0-8) 
Problems in space design, and building construction, based on an analysis 

of space requirements as determined from economic, and social data. Pre- 
requisite: A.E. 332. 

334. Materials and Methods of Construction. Credit 3(0-6) 

Non-fire resistant construction; framing methods for small buildings, 
characteristics of materials, standard detailing and dimensioning. Prerequi- 
site: A.E. 223. 

335. Materials and Methods of Construction. Credit 3(0-6) 
Semi-fireproof construction, framing methods, material characteristics, 

standard detailing and dimensioning. Prerequisite: A.E. 334. 

336. Materials and Methods of Construction. Credit 3(0-6) 
Fireproof construction, framing methods, material characteristics, fire- 
proofing, standard detailing and dimensioning. Prerequisite: A.E. 335. 

337. Structural Elements. Credit 2(1-2) 
Graphical and algebraic analysis of forces, truss stresses, moments of 

inertia, centroids. Prerequisite: M.E. 101. 

338. Theory of Structures. Credit 2(1-2) 
Graphical and algebraic analysis of bending moments, shears and deflec- 
tions, kerns, pressures, shears in masonry structures. Bending theory, and 
design of simple structural members of timber, steel and masonry. Pre- 
requisite: A.E. 337 and enrollment in M.E. 102. 

441. Theory of Structures. Credit 5(2-6) 
The elastic theory, bending in unsymmetrical sections, columns, analysis 

of steel trusses and plate girders, truss deflections by methods of virtual 
work and Williot mohr; special beam and girder connections. Prerequisite: 
M.E. 312 and A.E. 338. 

442. Theory of Structures. Credit 5(2-6) 
Analysis of indeterminate portal frames and bents, virtual work, slope 

deflection, and moment distribution methods applied to the solution of 
statically indeterminate problems; introduction to plastic design for struc- 
tural steel. Prerequisite: A.E. 441. 



School of Engineering 189 

443. Structural Design. Credit 5(2-6) 
Design of timber and steel building structures. Prerequisite: A.E. 442. 

444. Electrical Equipment of Buildings. Credit 3(3-0) 
Characteristics of electrical distribution systems, computation of electrical 

loads, theory and design of wiring systems, selection of conductors and 
equipment, theory and design of lighting systems. Prerequisite: A.E. 335. 

446. Professional Practice. Credit 2(4-0) 
Procedures of professional practice, registration, ethics, professional serv- 
ices, contracts, bonds, liens, insurances, and bidding procedures, supervision 
and administration of construction operations; office management and ac- 
counting. Seminar. Prerequisite: Junior Classification. 

447. Architectural Design. Credit 5(0-10) 
Problems in space analysis, and design; the choice of materials, economic 

considerations and methods of construction. Prerequisite: A.E. 333. 

448. Architectural Design. Credit 5(0-10) 
Space analysis, and design with emphasis on site planning. Prerequisite: 

A.E. 333. 

449. Building Sanitation. Credit 3(3-0) 
Principles of plumbing, including venting, drainage, demand and load 

calculations, water distribution, pipe sizing, storm drainage and sprinkler 
systems. Prerequisite: A.E. 335. 

451. Reinforced Concrete Theory. Credit 3(3-0) 
Reinforced concrete theory as applied to building structures. Theory of 

design for beams, slabs and columns. Prerequisites: A.E. 338 and M.E. 312. 

452. Reinforced Concrete Design. Credit 3(3-0) 
Design of reinforced concrete building structures. Continuity in reinforced 

concrete, footings and retaining walls. Prerequisite: A.E. 451. 



DEPARTMENT OF ART 

LeRoy F. Holmes, Chairman 



The Fine Arts and their influences are inextricably bound up with the 
nature and meaning of living. Everywhere one turns, the presence and in- 
fluence of art can be seen and felt. 

The objectives of the department are to guide the student through 
carefully planned classroom, studio, and working experiences, to develop 
his aesthetic sensibilities, technical ability, and to broaden his general edu- 
cation. This basic preparation lays a foundation for careers as creative 
artists or art teachers. 

The Art Department offers courses in two different but interrelated 
areas. One embraces art history and the other deals with the more creative 
aspects such as drawing, painting, and ceramics. In addition to these the 
student may receive instruction in anatomy, composition, poster design, and 



190 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



graphic arts. The four year program leading to the Bachelor of Science 
Degree in Fine Arts is designed to integrate studio major and academic 
courses. The fundamentals of art, coupled with work in other areas, insure 
an acquaintance with each field and from these the student may acquire 
skill and understanding of creative experience. Students must complete 216 
quarter hours of credit for graduation. Of this total, a minimum of 67 
quarter hours must be in art courses. No academic minor is required since 
the degree presupposes both a major and minor in art. 



Suggested Program for Art Major 
Freshman Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Art 111, 112, 113 3 

English 101, 102, 103 5 

Chemistry 101, 102, Art 120 5 

Mathematics 111, 112, History 210 5 

Physical Education 1 

Electives* 1 

20 

Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Art 114, 115, 116 2 

Art 217, 218, 219 3 

French or German 101, 102, 103 5 

History 320, 230 or 310 5 

Mechanical Engineering 101, 102, 103 3 

Physical Education 1 

Electives* 2 

21 

Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Art 326, 327 — 

Art 331, 341 2 

Art 337, 338, 339 3 

Art 347, 348, 349 3 

English Elective — 

History 220 5 

History 330 — 

Electives** 7 

20 

Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Art 421 3 

Art 423, 430 3 

Art 428, 429 2 

Health Education 234 6 

Electives** 6 



Winter 


Spring 


3 


3 


5 


5 


5 


3 


5 


5 


1 


1 


1 


1 



20 



21 



Winter 

3 
2 

5 
5 



20 



Winter 


Spring 


2 


2 


3 


3 


5 


5 


5 


— 


3 


3 


1 


1 


2 


2 



16 



Winter 


Spring 


2 


2 


3 


— 


3 


3 


3 


3 


— 


5 


^_ 


5 


7 


2 


18 


20 



Spring 



10 
10 



14 



13 



10 



* Freshman and sophomore male students who are not veterans are required to enroll 
in military or air science each quarter of their freshman and sophomore years. 

** Students electing teaching option will select required courses for state certification as 
listed under the Department of Education and Psychology 



School of Engineering 191 

COURSES IN ART 
Undergraduate 

111. Freehand Drawing. Credit 3(0-6) 
A study of the fundamental principles of drawing as a useful mode of 

visual expression. Selected problems involving basic considerations of line, 
mass and color are presented for analysis and laboratory practice. 

112. Lettering and Poster Design. Credit 3(0-6) 
A comprehensive study of the art of lettering with speedball pens, the 

principles of layout, poster construction, and general advertising. 

113. Water-color Painting. Credit 3(0-6) 
Provides a working knowledge of color both from the standpoint of its use 

and enjoyment. Various theories of color are analyzed along with drill on 
the techniques of water-color painting. Prerequisite: 111. 

114. Art Appreciation. Credit 2(2-0) 
An introductory course to the study of fine arts. Basic qualities of various 

forms of artistic expression are explained. Emphasis is placed on the appli- 
cation of art principles in everyday life. 

115. History of Art. Credit 2(2-0) 
A general introduction to the history of art beginning with an examina- 
tion of Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Aegean, Greek, and Roman art in terms 
of their extent monuments and culminating with the climax of medieval art 
in the Gothic period. 

116. History of Art. Credit 2(2-0) 
A continuation of art 115 with emphasis on the development of art from 

the Italian Renaissance to the present by means of analysis and comparison 
of works of representative artists. 

120. Anatomy. Credit 3(1-5) 

A study of the human figure with emphasis on anatomy, body structure 
and human proportions, draped and undraped figures at rest and in action. 

217. Beginning Design. Credit 3(0-6) 
An introduction to visual design based upon an analysis of the aims, ele- 
ments, principles, and sources of design and their application in a variety 
of media. 

218. Intermediate Design. Credit 3(0-6) 
A continuation of art 217 with emphasis on the expressive possibilities 

of the elements of design and on the development of the student's creative 
ability. 

219. Advanced Design. Credit 3(0-6) 
A continuation of art 218, with consideration given to three dimensional 

as well as two dimensional problems. Students are encouraged in the ex- 
perimental use of materials and are required to find individual and complete 
solutions to problems through the various stages of research, planning and 
presentation. Emphasis is placed on technical perfection and the develop- 
ment of professional attitudes. 

326. History of Art. Credit 2(2-0) 

Art of the Italian Renaissance. The study of painting, sculpture, and 
architecture in Italy from 1300 to 1600. 



192 The Agricultural and Technical College 

327. History of Art. Credit 2(2-0) 

Art of the Northern Renaissance. A study of painting, sculpture, and 
architecture from 1400 to 1600 in the Netherlands, Germany, France, Spain, 
and England. Papers, reading assignments, and museum trips supplement 
lecture material. 

331. Composition. Credit 2(0-4) 

A study of the basic principles of pictorial composition or designing the 
picture with definite consideration of the requirements of commercial art; 
drills in abstract arrangements of dark and light are given. 

337. Elementary Ceramics. Credit 3(1-5) 
Study of the historical development, materials and processes, and struc- 
tural forms as well as simple exercises in modeling in clay. Supplementary 
reading and laboratory practice is required. Fall. 

338. Intermediate Ceramics. Credit 3(0-6) 
A continuation of art 337 with emphasis in studio techniques. Review of 

methods of hand-building; introduction of potter's wheel, casting and glaz- 
ing. Each student is given experience in firing the kiln. Prerequisite: Art 
337. 

339. Jewelry and Metalwork. Credit 3(0-6) 
The design and technical essentials of jewelry making and metalwork. 

341. Figure Drawing. Credit 3(0-6) 

A study of the human figure from life. A study of the full length figure 
with emphasis on proportion, action and modeling in full values. 

347. Oil Painting. Credit 3(0-6) 
Studv of oil painting with emphasis placed on the technique of oil paint- 
ing still life, landscapes and portraits. 

348. Oil Painting. Credit 3(0-6) 
A continuation of 347 with emphasis on the development of original 

themes. Prerequisite: 347. 

349. Oil Painting. Credit 3(0-6) 
A continuation of 348 with emphasis on originality of subjects and treat- 
ment. Prerequisite: 348. 

421. Commercial Art. Credit 3(0-6) 

The handling of various media used in commercial art — laboratory drills 
in sketching and rendering in pen and ink and wash. Prerequisite: 113. 

423. General Crafts. Credit 3(0-6) 

Introduction to craft processes, weaving, metalwork, leather, etc. 

428. Art History. Credit 2(2-0) 
Baroque Art. The study of painting, sculpture, and architecture in Italy, 

the Netherlands, France, Spain, and Germany from 1600 to 1800. 

429. History of Art. Credit 2(2-0) 
Modern Art. European and American art from 1875 to the present. 

430. Introduction to Graphic Arts. Credit 3(0-6) 
Introduction to printmaking processes. Production of prints in varied 

media, woodcuts, serigraphs, drypoint, etchings, and lithographs. 



School of Engineering 193 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

501. Public School Art. Credit 3(3-0) 
Study of materials, methods and procedures in teaching art in the public 

schools. Special emphasis is placed on selection and organization of ma- 
terials, seasonal projects, the lesson plan and correlation, lectures, demon- 
strations, assigned readings. Summer and Spring Quarters. 

502. Drawing and Painting for Graduate Students. Credit 3(0-6) 
Study of basic consideration of line-form content-technique. Summer 

Quarter. 

503. Seminar In Art History. Credit 3(3-0) 
This course is a round table discussion with student reports. Prerequisite: 

Consent of the instructor. 

504. Studio Techniques. Credit 3(0-6) 
Lectures, demonstrations that illustrate and describe the properties and 

use of varied media. As a point of departure for individual expression, 
these techniques are analyzed and discussed. 

505. Advanced Ceramics. Credit 3 3(0-6) 
Advanced studio problems and projects in ceramics with emphasis on in- 
dependent creative work. Opportunities for original research. Prerequisite: 
Art 338. 

5C6. Printmaking. Credit 3 3(0-6) 

Investigation of traditional and experimental methods in printmaking. 
Advanced studio problems in woodcutting, etching, lithography, and seri- 
graphy. Prerequisite: Art 330, 331. 

507. Sculpture. Credit 3 3(0-6) 
Exploring methods of using various materials such as clay, plaster, and 

metals with emphasis on the design and production of sculpture. Pre- 
requisite: Art 338. 

508. Project Seminar. Credit 3 3(0-6) 
Advanced specialized studies in creative painting, design, and sculpture. 

By means of discussion and suggestions this seminar intends to solve various 
problems which might arise in each work. Prerequisite: Consent of the in- 
structor. 



DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS 

T. Mahaffey, Chairman 



The curricula of the Department of Business are designed to develop 
students with abilities, attitudes, understandings and concepts essential for 
leadership in business, industry, education, and government. In addition 
to the basic lower level program required of all freshmen and sophomores, 
several fields of concentration are provided to meet the varying needs for 
specialization at the upper level for juniors and seniors. Students are re- 
quired to include in their programs courses which will give them a broad 



194 The Agricultural and Technical College 

liberal education directed toward preventing the narrowing effects of over- 
specialization. Though professional competence in one's major concentration 
in the field of business is of primary importance, the student should be 
stimulated to participate actively in community affairs. He should also be 
continuously made aware of and exposed to an atmosphere of gracious 
living. 

To serve the youth of North Carolina and the nation, the Department of 
Business endeavors to achieve the following objectives: 

1. To develop the abilities and concepts essential for leadership in busi- 
ness, especially in the field of major concentration. 

2. To prepare for graduate study. 

3. To provide an understanding of economic, political and social values 
necessary for effective leadership. 

4. To maintain contacts with the many institutional publics through the 
departmental internship programs, clinics, workshops, meetings, insti- 
tutes, and conferences. The cooperation of persons actively engaged 
in business, in the professions and in government is desirable in the 
development of a well-rounded student and in the solution of common 
problems. 

5. To provide within the environment of business an introduction to the 
atmosphere of gracious living. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 

Students in the Department of Business who meet the general require- 
ments of the College and who complete satisfactorily the chosen curriculum 
in the Department, are awarded degrees appropriate to their curricula. To 
be recommended for a degree from the Department of Business a student 
must: (1) attain a cumulative average of 2.00 or better on all courses 
undertaken, (2) attain a cumulative average of 2.00 or better on all business 
and economics core courses undertaken, and (3) attain a cumulative aver- 
age of 2.00 or better in his major. Each curriculum requires a minimum 
of 200 quarter hours of credit. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

The Department of Business offers curricula leading to the following 
degrees: Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Bachelor of 
Science in Business Education and Bachelor of Science in Secretarial Sci- 
ence. 

A two-year program in Secretarial Science leads to the degree of Asso- 
ciate in Science in Secretarial Science. 

These programs and requirements become effective for (1) all students 
enrolling as freshmen in the fall quarter, 1963, (2) all students transferring 
from other colleges, (3) students previously enrolled in this college, in the 
fall quarter, 1965. 



School of Engineering 



195 



Required Business and Economics Core Courses in Business Administration 

The following courses shall constitute the business and economics core 
courses upon which the student must attain an average of 2.00 or better. 

Course Description Qtr. Hrs. 

Accounting 201, 202, 203 Principles of Accounting 9 

Mathematics 115 Mathematics of Finance 5 

Bus. Adm. 102 Introduction of Business 5 

Bus. Adm. 301 Principles of Marketing 3 

Bus. Adm. 302, 303, 304 Principles of Business Law 9 

Bus. Adm. 305 Management 3 

Bus. Adm. 306 Business Communication 3 

Mathematics 218 Statistics 5 

Bus. Adm. 308 Principles of Insurance 3 

Economics 410 Labor Problems 5 

Bus. Adm. 314 Money and Banking 3 

Bus. Adm. 401 Business Finance 3 

Bus. Adm. 402 Personal Finance 3 

Bus. Adm. 404 Internship 2 

Economics 310, 312 Principles of Economics 10 

Sec. Sc. 101, 102, 103 Typewriting 6 

Sec. Sc. 204 Business Machines 2 

79 

Business Administration 

ACCOUNTING OPTION 

Students who satisfactorily complete the requirements of this curriculum 
will be prepared for accounting positions in business, industry, and govern- 
ment. 

Freshman Year 

Course and No, Fall Winter Spring 

English 101, 102, 103 5 5 5 

Science, Mathematics 115 5 5 5 

Secretarial Science 101, 102, 103 2 2 2 

Education 101, Math. Ill, Bus. Adm. 102 5 5 

Humanities, 201 3 — — 

Physical Education 1 1 1 

Military/Air Science* 1 1 1 

Electives (Women) (Non Dept.) 3 — — 



17-19 



18-19 



18-19 



Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Accounting 201, 202, 203 3 

Economics 310, 312, Geography 310 5 

Art 114, English 330, Social Science 2 

English 210, Secretarial Science 204 3 

Health Education 111 3 

Military/ Air Science* 2 

Physical Education 1 

Electives (Women) (Non Dept.) — 

17-19 



Winter 

3 
5 
5 



2 

1 
3 

16-17 



Spring 
3 
5 
3 
2 

2 
1 
3 



16-17 



* Freshman and sophomore male students who are not veterans are required to enroll in 
air science or military science each quarter of their freshman and sophomore years. 



196 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Bus. Adm. 301, 303, Mathematics 218 3 

Bus. Adm. 302, 305, 304 3 

Bus. Adm. 314, 306 3 

Accounting 301, 302, 303 . . 3 

Accounting 304, 305 3 

Electives (Non Dept.) ** — 

15 
Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Bus. Adm. 401, Accounting 404, 405 3 

Bus. Adm. 308, 402, 404 3 

Accounting 402, Eco. 410, Elec. (Non Dept.)** 3 

Accounting 403 — 

Electives (Non Dept.) ** 6 

15 



Winter 


Spring 


3 


5 


3 


3 


3 


— 


3 


3 


3 


— 


3 


6 


18 


17 


Winter 


Spring 


3 


3 


3 


2 


5 


9 


3 


— 


3 


— 



17 



14 



The following courses shall constitute the option in accounting upon which 
the student must attain an average of 2.00 or better: 



Courses 
Accounting 301, 302 
Accounting 402, 403 
Accounting 304, 305 
Accounting 303 
Accounting 404, 405 



Description Qtr. Hrs. 

Intermediate Accounting 6 

Advanced Accounting 6 

Cost Accounting 6 

Federal Income Tax Accounting 3 

Auditing 6 



27 

Business Administration 

GENERAL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION OPTION 

Students who satisfactorily complete the requirements of this curriculum 
will be prepared for executive positions in business, government and in- 
dustry. They will also be prepared to establish and operate a business 
establishment of their own. 



Freshman Year 



Course and No. 



Fall 



English 101, 102, 103 5 

Science, Mathematics 115 5 

Secretarial Science 101, 102, 103 2 

Education 101, Math. Ill, Bus. Adm. 102 .. . 

Humanities 201 3 

Physical Education 1 

Military/ Air Science* 1 

Electives (Women) (Non Dept.) 3 



17-19 



Winter 
5 
5 
2 
5 

1 
1 



18-19 



Spring 
5 
5 
2 
5 

1 
1 



18-19 



* Freshman and sophomore male students who are not veterans are required to enroll 
in air science or military science each quarter of their freshman and sophomore years. 

** The student who is interested in the study of computer programming should elect 
courses in analytic geometry and at least two quarters of the calculus. It is strongly sug- 
gested that other students should elect a foreign language. 



School of Engineering 



197 



Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Accounting 201, 202, 203 3 

Economics 310, 312, Geography 310 5 

Art 114, English 330, Social Science 2 

English 210, Sec. Sc. 204 3 

Health Education 111 3 

Phys. Ed 1 

Mil./Air Science* 2 

Electives (Women) (Non Dept.) 2 

19 



Winter 
3 
5 
5 
2 

1 
2 
2 

18 



Spring 
3 
5 
6 



17 



Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Business Administration 301, 303, Math. 218 3 

Business Administration 302, 305 3 

Business Administration 314, 306, 304 3 

Accounting 301, 302, Business Adm. 312 3 
Electives (Non Dept.)*, Bus. Adm. 311, 

Elec. (Non Dept.)* 3 

15 



Winter 
3 
3 
3 
3 


Spring 
5 

3 
3 


3 


7 


15 


18 



Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall 
Business Adm. 401, Econ. 410, B. A. 404 ... . 3 

Bus. Adm. 308, 402, 410 3 

Soc. Sc, Bus. Adm. 411, 409 3 

Bus. Adm. 403 3 

Electives (Non Dept.) ** 2 

14 



Winter 
5 
3 
3 



17 



Spring 
2 
3 
3 



15 



The following courses shall constitute the option in general business 
administration upon which the student must attain an average of 2.00 or 
better: 

Courses Description Qtr. Hrs. 

Accounting 301, 302 Intermediate Accounting 6 

Bus. Adm. 311 Real Estate 3 

Bus. Adm. 312 Advertising 3 

Bus. Adm. 403 Salesmanship 3 

Bus. Adm. 409 Personnel Administration 3 

Bus. Adm. 410 Principles of detailing 3 

Bus. Adm. 411 Principles of Investment 3 

24 

* Freshman and sophomore male students who are not veterans are required to enroll 
in air science or military science each quarter of their freshman and sophomore years. 

** The student who is interested in the study of computer programming should elect 
courses in analytic geometry and at least two quarters of the calculus. It is strongly sug- 
gested that other students should elect a foreign language. 



198 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



Business Administration 
INSURANCE OPTION 

Students who satisfactorily complete the requirements of this curriculum 
will be prepared for positions in the insurance business. 



Freshman Year 

Course and No. Fall 

English 101, 102, 103 5 

Science, Mathematics 115 5 

Sec. Sc. 101, 102, 103 2 

Humanities, 201 3 

Physical Education 1 

Military/ Air Science* 1 

Electives (Women) (Non Dept.) 3 

Education 101, Math. Ill, Bus. Adm. 102 . . 



17-19 



Winter 
5 
5 
2 

1 

1 



18-19 



Spring 
5 
5 
2 

1 

1 



18-19 



Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Accounting 201, 202, 203 3 

Economics 310, 312, Geography 310 5 

Art 114, English 330, Social Science 2 

English 210, Health Ed. Ill 3 

Sec. Sc. 204 2 

Phys. Ed 1 

Military /Air Science* 2 

Electives (Women) (Non Dept.) 2 

18 



Winter 

3 
5 
5 
3 

1 
2 



19 



Spring 
3 
5 
6 



17 



Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Bus. Adm. 301, 303, Mathematics 218 3 

Bus. Adm. 302, 305 3 

Bus. Adm. 314, 306, 304 3 

Bus. Adm. 308, 309, 310 3 

Elec. (Non Dept.)**, Bus. Adm. 311, 

Elec. (Non Dept.1 ** 3 

15 

Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Bus. Adm. 401, Econ. 410, Bus. Adm. 404 .. . 3 

Bus. Adm. 402, 407 — 

Bus. Adm. 403, 406, 409 3 

Bus. Adm. 405, 408 3 

Electives (Non Dept.) ** 6 

15 



Winter 


Spring 


3 


5 


3 


— 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


6 


15 


17 


Winter 


Spring 


5 


2 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


— 


3 


7 



17 



15 



* Freshman and sophomore male students who are not veterans are required to enroll 
in air science or military science each quarter of their freshman and sophomore years. 

** The student who is interested in the study of computer programming should elect 
courses in analytic geometry and at least two quarters of the calculus. It is strongly sug- 
gested that other students should elect a foreign language. 



School of Engineering 199 

The following courses shall constitute the option in insurance upon which 
the student must attain an average of 2.00 or better: 

Courses Description Qtr. Hrs. 

Bus. Adm. 309 Life Insurance 3 

Bus. Adm. 310 Property Insurance 3 

Bus. Adm. 311 Real Estate 3 

Bus. Adm. 403 Salesmanship 3 

Bus. Adm. 405 Health Insurance 3 

Bus. Adm. 406 Social Insurance 3 

Bus. Adm. 407 Business Insurance 3 

Bus. Adm. 408 Office Organization & Management 3 

Bus. Adm. 409 Personnel Administration 3 

27 

Required Business and Economics Core Courses in Business Education 

The following courses shall constitute the business and economics core 
courses upon which the student must attain an average of 2.00 or better. 

Courses Description Qtr. Hrs. 

Accounting 201, 202, 203 Principles of Accounting 9 

Mathematics 115 Mathematics of Finance 5 

Bus. Adm. 102 Introduction to Business 5 

Bus. Adm. 301 Principles of Marketing 3 

Bus. Adm. 302, 303 Principles of Business Law 6 

Bus. Adm. 305 Principles of Management 3 

Bus. Adm. 306 Business Communication 3 

Mathematics 218 Statistics 5 

Bus. Adm. 314 Money and Banking 3 

Bus. Adm. 402, 404 Personal Finance 3 

Economics 310, 312 Principles of Economics 10 

Sec. Sc. 101, 102, 103, 104 Typewriting 8 

Sec. Sc. 204 Business Machines 2 

Sec. Sc. 403 Secretarial Training 3 

Sec. Sc. 404 Internship 2 

70 

Business Education 

COMPREHENSIVE BUSINESS EDUCATION OPTION 

Students who satisfactorily complete the requirements of this curriculum 
will be prepared to teach business subjects at the secondary school level. 
This curriculum meets the certification requirements of the State of North 
Carolina. 

Freshman Year 
Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

English 101, 102, 103 5 5 5 

Science, Mathematics 115 5 5 5 

Sec. Sc. 101, 102, 103 2 2 2 

Ed. 101, Math. Ill, Bus. Adm. 102 5 5 

Humanities 201 3 — — 

Physical Education 1 1 1 

Military/Air Science* 1 1 1 

Electives (Women) (Non Dept.) 3 — — 

17-19 18-19 18-19 



* Freshman and sophomore male students who are not veterans are required to enroll 
in air science or military science each quarter of their freshman and sophomore years. 



200 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Accounting 201, 202, 203 3 3 3 

Psychology 201, Economics 310, 312 5 5 5 

Sec. Sc. 201, 202, 203 3 3 3 

Sec. Sc. 104, 204, English 210 2 2 3 

Ed. 201, Psychology 203, 301 3 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 1 

Military/Air Science* 2 2 2 

Electives (Women) (Non Dept.) 2 2 2 

19 19 20 



Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Bus. Adm. 301, 303, Mathematics 218 3 3 5 

Bus. Adm. 302, 305, Geography 310 3 3 5 

Bus. Adm. 314, 306, Education 202 3 3 3 

Accounting 301, 302, Art 114 3 3 2 

Education 203, Phy. 302, Bus. Ed. 436 or 

Soc. Sc 3 3 3 

Sec. Sc. 302, 303, 304 3 3 3 

Health Education 111 3 — — 



21 



18 



21 



Senior Year 

(For Professional Block Taken Fall Quarter) 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Business Education 452, Bus. Adm. 402, 312 10 3 3 

Education 301, Bus. Adm. 410, 403 3 3 3 

Sec. Sc. 403, 404 — 3 2 

Bus. Adm. 408, English 330 — 3 5 

Social Science — 3 — 



13 



15 



13 



(For Professional Block Taken Spring Quarter) 

Course and No. Fall Winter 

Bus. Adm. 403, 402, Bus. Ed. 452 3 3 

English 330, Bus. Adm. 410, Education 301 .. 5 3 

Bus. Adm. 312, 408 3 3 

Sec. Sc. 403, 404 3 2 

Bus. Ed. 436 — 3 



Spring 
10 
3 



14 



14 



13 



* Freshman and sophomore male students who are not veterans are required to enroll 
in air science or military science each quarter of their freshman and sophomore years. 



School of Engineering 



201 



The following courses shall constitute the option in comprehensive busi- 
ness education upon which the student must attain an average of 2.00 or 
better: 

Courses Description Qtr. Hrs. 

Accounting 301, 302 Intermediate Accounting 6 

Bus. Adm. 312 Principles of Advertising 3 

Bus. Adm. 403 Principles of Salesmanship 3 

Bus. Adm. 408 Office Management 3 

Bus. Adm. 410 Principles of Retailing 3 

Sec. Sc. 201, 202, 203 Shorthand 9 

Sec. Sc. 302, 303, 304 Transcription 9 

36 



The following courses shall constitute the professional education courses 
upon which the student must attain an average of 2.00 or better for all 
business education options. 

Courses Description Qtr. Hrs. 

Education 201 Introduction to Education 3 

Education 202 Philosophy of Education 3 

Psychology 203 Adolescent Psychology 3 

Psychology 301 Educational Psychology 3 

P~ychology 302 Test-, and Measurements 3 

Education 203 A udio- Visual Aids 3 

Bus'ness Edu. 436 Methods of Teaching Skill Subjects or 
or 437 

Professional Block: Methods of Teaching Business Subjects 3 

Education 301 Principles of Education 3 

Business Edu. 452 Observation & Practice Teaching 10 

34 



To be eligible for Practice Teaching, the student must have met the 
following requirements (both comprehensive business education and busi- 
ness education excluding shorthand): 

1. Have senior standing. 

2. Have completed three-fourths of the number of hours required in the 

basic business and economics core courses. 

3. Have completed three-fourths of the number of hours required in his 
subject matter option. 

4. Have attained an average of 2.00 or better upon all work undertaken 
in the college, upon all professional education courses undertaken, 
and upon all courses undertaken in the subject matter option. 

5. Possess a personality deemed necessary for successful teaching. 



202 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



BUSINESS EDUCATION 

BUSINESS EDUCATION OPTION EXCLUDING SHORTHAND 

Students who satisfactorily complete the requirements of this curriculum 
will be prepared to teach business subjects, except shorthand, at the secon- 
dary school level. This curriculum meets the certification requirements of 
the State of North Carolina. 

Freshman Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

English 101, 102, 103 5 5 5 

Science, Mathematics 115 5 5 5 

Sec. Sc. 101, 102, 103 2 2 2 

Education 101, Math. Ill, Bus. Adm. 102 5 5 

Humanities 201 3 — — 

Physical Education 1 1 1 

Military/Air Science* 1 1 1 

Electives (Women) (Non Dept.) 3 — — 

17-19 18-19 18-19 
Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Accounting 201, 202, 203 3 3 3 

Psychology 201, Economics 310, 312 5 5 5 

Education 201, Psychology 203, 301 3 3 3 

Sec. Sc. 104, Art 114 2 2 — 

Sec. Sc. 204, English 210, 330 2 3 5 

Physical Education 1 1 1 

Military/Air Science* 2 2 2 

Electives (Women) (Non Dept.) 2 2 2 

18 19 19 
Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Bus. Adm. 301, 303, Mathematics 218 3 3 5 

Bus. Adm. 302, 305, Geography 310 3 3 5 

Bus. Adm. 314, 306, Education 202 3 3 3 

Accounting 301, 302, Bus. Adm. 409 3 3 3 

Bus. Adm. 308, Psy. 302, Soc. Sc. or 

Bus. Ed. 437 3 3 3 

Education 203 3 — — 

Health Education 111 — 3 — 

18 18 19 

Senior Year 
(For Professional Block Taken Fall Quarter) 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Bus. Ed. 452, Sec. Sc. 403, Bus. Adm. 401 . 10 3 3 

Education 301, Bus. Adm. 402, 403 3 3 3 

Bus. Adm. 410, 312 — 3 3 

Bus. Adm. 408, 404 — 3 2 

Social Science — 3 3 



13 



15 



14 



* Freshman and sophomore male students who are not veterans are required to enroll 
in air science or military science each quarter of their freshman and sophomore years. 



School of Engineering 203 

(For Professional Block Taken Spring Quarter) 

Sec. Sc. 403, Bus. Adm. 404, Bus. Ed. 452 3 2 10 

Bus. Adm. 402, 401, Education 301 3 3 3 

Bus. Adm. 410, 403 3 3 — 

Bus. Adm. 408, 312 3 3 — 

Social Science, Bus. Ed. 437 3 3 — 

15 14 13 

The following courses shall constitute the option in business education, 
excluding shorthand, upon which the student must attain an average of 2.00 
or better. 
Courses Description Qtr. Hrs. 

Accounting 301, 302 Intermediate Accounting 6 

Bus. Adm. 308 Principles of Insurance 3 

Bus. Adm. 312 Principles of Advertising 3 

Bus. Adm. 401 Business Finance 3 

Bus. Adm. 403 Principles of Salesmanship 3 

Bus. Adm. 408 Office Management 3 

Bus. Adm. 409 Personnel Management 3 

Bus. Adm. 410 Principles of Retailing 3 

27 

BUSINESS EDUCATION— MINOR TEACHING FIELDS 

Students enrolled in other secondary school teaching curriculums may 
elect any one of the following business education minors: 

1. Basic Business — 37 quarter hours required 

Courses Required: Qtr. Hrs. 

Accounting 201, 202, 203 Principles of Accounting 9 

Accounting 301, 302 Intermediate Accounting 6 

Bus. Adm. 302 Principles of Business Law I 3 

Bus. Adm. 305 Principles of Management 3 

Bus. Adm. 314 Money and Banking 3 

Bus. Adm. 402 Personal Finance 3 

Economics 310, 312 Principles of Economics 10 

2. Bookkeeping — 24 quarter hours required 

Courses Required: Qtr. Hrs. 

Accounting 201, 202, 203 Principles of Accounting 9 

Accounting 301, 302 Intermediate Accounting 6 

Accounting 402 Advanced Accounting 3 

Accounting 304 Cost Accounting , 3 

Bus. Adm. 408 Office Management 3 

3. Stenography — 26 quarter hours required 

Courses Required: Qtr. Hrs. 

Sec. Sc. 101, 102, 103, 104 Typewriting 8 

Sec. Sc. 201, 202, 203 Shorthand 9 

Sec. Sc. 302, 303, 304 Transcription 9 

4. Typewriting — 8 quarter hours required 

Courses Required: Qtr. Hrs. 
Sec. Sc. 101, 102, 103, 104 Typewriting 8 



204 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



SECRETARIAL SCIENCE (Four-Year) Option 

The following courses shall constitute the business and economics core 
courses upon which the student must attain an average of 2.00 or better: 

Students who satisfactorily complete the requirements of this curriculum 
will be prepared for secretarial positions in government, industry, and busi- 



Courses 

Accounting 201, 202, 203 

Mathematics 115 

Bus. Adm. 102 

Bus. Adm. 301 

Bus. Adm. 302, 303 

Bus. Adm. 305 

Bus. Adm. 306 

Mathematics 218 

Bus. Adm. 314 

Bus. Adm. 402 

Sec. Sc. 404 

Economics 310, 312 

Sec. Sc. 101, 102, 103, 104 

Sec. Sc. 204 

Sec. Sc. 403 



Description Qtr. Hrs. 

Principles of Accounting 9 

Mathematics of Finance 5 

Introduction to Business 5 

Principles of Marketing 3 

Principles of Business Law 6 

Principles of Management 3 

Business Communication 3 

Statistics 5 

Money and Banking 3 

Personal Finance 3 

Internship 2 

Principles of Economics 10 

Typewriting 8 

Business Machines 2 

Secretarial Training 3 

70 



Freshman Year 

Course and No. Fall 

English 101, 102, 103 5 

Science, Mathematics 115 5 

Sec. Sc. 101, 102, 103 2 

Ed. 101, Math. Ill, Bus. Adm. 102 

Humanities 201 3 

Physical Education 1 

Military/Air Science* 1 

Electives (Women) (Non Dept.) 3 



Winter 
5 
5 
2 
5 

1 
1 



Spring 
5 
5 
2 
5 

1 
1 



17-19 



18-19 



18-19 



Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Accounting 201, 202, 203 3 

Psychology 201, Economics 310, Sec. Sc. 204 5 

Sec. Sc. 104, English 210, Economics 312 .. . 2 

Sec. Sc. 201, 202, 203 3 

Social Science, Art 114, English 330 3 

Physical Education 1 

Military/Air Science* 2 

Electives (Women) (Non Dept.) 2 

19 



Winter 

3 
5 
3 
3 
2 
1 
2 
2 

17 



Spring 
3 
2 
5 
3 
5 
1 
2 
2 

19 



* Freshman and sophomore male students who are not veterans are required to enroll 
in air science or military science each quarter of their freshman and sophomore years. 



School of Engineering 



205 



Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Bus. Adm. 301, 303, Mathematics 218 3 3 5 

Bus. Adm. 302, 305, Geography 310 3 3 5 

Sec. Sc. 302, 303, 304 3 3 3 

Bus. Adm. 314, 306, Social Science 3 3 3 

Electives (Non Dept.), Sec. Sc. 310 3 — 2 

Health Education 111 3 — — 



18 



12 



18 



Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Bus. Adm. 401, 408, Sec. Sc. 404 3 

Bus. Adm. 312, 402, 410 3 

Bus. Adm. 308, Sec. Sc. 403, Bus. Adm. 409 3 

Bus. Adm. 403, Electives (Non Dept.) 3 

Electives (Non Dept.), Social Science 3 

15 



Winter 
3 
3 
3 
6 



15 



Spring 
2 
3 
3 
4 
3 

15 



The following courses shall constitute the major in secretarial science 
(4 years) upon which the student must attain an average of 2.00 or better. 

Bus. Adm. 308 Principles of Insurance 3 

Bus. Adm. 401 Business Finance 3 

Bus. Adm. 403 Principles of Salesmanship 3 

Bus. Adm. 408 Office Management 3 

Bus. Adm. 409 Personnel Administration 3 

Bus. Adm. 410 Principles of Retailing 3 

Sec. Sc. 201, 202, 203 Shorthand , 9 

Sec. Sc. 302, 303, 304 Transcription 9 

Sec. Sc. 310 Filing 2 

38 

Secretarial Science (Two-Year) Option 

Students who satisfactorily complete the requirements of this program 
will be prepared for junior secretarial positions in government, industry, 
and business. 



Freshman Year 

Course and No. Fall 

English 101, 102, 103 5 

Science, Mathematics 115 5 

Sec. Sc. 101, 102, 103 - 2 

Sec. Sc. 201, 202, 203 3 

Education 101 

Physical Education 1 

Military/Air Science* 1 

Electives (Women) (Non Dept.) 3 



17-19 



Winter 

5 
5 
2 
3 

1 
1 



16-17 



Spring 
5 
5 
2 
3 

1 
1 



16-17 



* Freshman and sophomore male students who are not veterans are required to enroll 
in air science or military science each quarter of their freshman and sophomore years. 



206 The Agricultural and Technical College 

Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Accounting 201, 202, 203 3 3 3 

Economics 310, 312, Bus. Adm. 102 5 5 5 

Sec. Sc. 302, 303, 304 3 3 3 

Sec. Sc. 104, Bus. Adm. 306, 408 2 3 3 

Sec. Sc. 204, English 210, Health Ed. Ill ... 2 3 3 

Sec. Sc. 310 2 — — 

Physical Education 1 1 1 

Military/Air Science* 2 2 2 

Electives (Women) (Non Dept.) 2 2 2 

20 20 20 



COURSES IN ACCOUNTING 

Undergraduate 

201, 202, 203. Principles of Accounting. Credit 3(3-0) each 

Accounts and records peculiar to sole proprietorships, partnerships and 
corporations are developed. Prerequisite or concurrent: Economics 310. 

301, 302. Intermediate Accounting. Credit 3(3-0) each 

Accounting principles of valuation in the preparation of the balance 
sheet and the income statement. Prerequisite: Accounting 203. 

303. Federal Tax Accounting. Credit 3(3-0) 
Special reference to federal, state, and local taxes as they apply to in- 
dividual and business taxpayers. Prerequisite: Accounting 203. 

304, 305. Cost Accounting. Credit 3(3-0) each 
Principles underlying the determination of cost with emphasis on the use 

of information concerning cost in the control of certain business activities. 
Prerequisite: Accounting 203. 

402, 403. Advanced Accounting. 3(3-0) each 

Considers advanced principles of accounting as applied to problems con- 
nected with revenue, agency and branch accounts and fiduciary operations. 
Prerequisite: Accounting 302. 

404, 405. Auditing Principles. Credit 3(3-0) each 

Emphasizes audit procedures and techniques used to verify balance sheet 
and income accounts. Prerequisites: Accounting 302, 305. 

COURSES IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

102. Introduction to Business. Credit 5(5-0) 

Designed to familiarize the student with the functions and structure of 
business enterprise. 

301. Principles of Marketing. Credit 3(3-0) 

Presentation of the fundamental principles, methods, and problems of 
marketing. Prerequisite: Economics 310. 



* Freshman and sophomore male students who are not veterans are required to enroll 
in air science or military science each quarter of their freshman and sophomore years. 



School of Engineering 207 

302, 303, 304. Principles of Business Law. Credit 3(3-0) each 

Designed to give practical knowledge concerning the law of contracts, 
agency, negotiable instruments, property, partnerships, corporations, etc. 
Prerequisite: Economics 310. 

305. Principles of Management. Credit 3(3-0) 
An examination of the principles underlying the organization and man- 
agement of business enterprise. Prerequisites: Accounting 201, Economics 
310. 

306. Business Communication. Credit 3(3-0) 
Types of communication peculiar to the needs of business are studied 

Prerequisite: Economics 310. 

308. Principles of Insurance. Credit 3(3-0) 
Attention is given to the principle types of insurance. Prerequisite: Eco- 

nomics 310. 

309. Life Insurance. Credit 3(3-0) 
Examines the fundamentals of life insurance. Prerequisite: Bus. Adm. 

308. 

310. Property Insurance. Credit 3(3-0) 
Studies the important types of property insurance contracts. Prerequisite: 

Bus. Adm. 308. 

311. Principles of Real Estate. Credit 3(3-0) 
Presents the fundamental economic aspects of real property with special 

attention given to the changing character of the urban economy and its 
effects on land values and land utilization. Prerequisite: Economics 310. 

312. Principles of Advertising. Credit 3(3-0) 
Consideration is given to the use of advertising and advertising media in 

the sale of goods and services. Prerequisite: Bus. Adm. 301. 

314. Money, Credit, and Banking. Credit 3(3-0) 

A treatment of the principles, functions, and value of money. Emphasis 
is placed on the banking organization with special treatment of the Federal 
Reserve System. Prerequisite: Economics 310. 

401. Business Finance. Credit 3(3-0) 
Treats problems involved in the financing of business enterprise. Pre- 
requisite: Economics 310. 

402. Personal Finance. Credit 3(3-0) 
Deals with the problems of money management faced by each individual 

as a consumer. Special attention is given to credit, borrowing and saving 
money, bank relationship, etc. Prerequisite: Economics 310. 

403. Principles of Salesmanship. Credit 3(3-0) 
The essential principles of effective selling are presented. Prerequisite: 

Bus. Adm. 301. 

404. Internship. Credit 2(1-10) 
A field work program of observation and work in selected business firms. 

Designed to contribute materially to the total development of the student's 
educational experiences. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 



208 The Agricultural and Technical College 

405. Health Insurance. Credit 3(3-0) 

Deals with the principles, problems and coverages involved in disability 
insurance. Prerequisite: Bus. Adm. 308. 

406. Social Insurance. Credit 3(3-0) 
Treats the means of providing for economic and social security. Pre- 
requisite: Bus. Adm. 308. 

407. Business Insurance. Credit 3(3-0) 
Consideration given to the insurance program of a successful business 

enterprise. Prerequisite: Bus. Adm. 308. 

408. Office Organization and Management. Credit 3(3-0) 
Consideration is given to the supervision and control of office procedures. 

Prerequisite: Bus. Adm. 305. 

409. Personnel Organization and Management. Credit 3(3-0) 
Deals with the principles involved in procuring and maintaining effective 

and satisfied employees. Prerequisite: Bus. Adm. 305. 

410. Principles of Retailing. Credit 3(3-0) 
Examines the principles and practices of retail store organization and 

management. Prerequisite: Bus. Adm. 301. 

411. Principles of Investment. Credit 3(3-0) 
Emphasizes the nature and types of investments. Prerequisite: Bus. Adm. 

401. 

412. Electronic and Automatic Data Processing For Business. 

Credit 3(3-0) 
Fundamentals of business data processing. The use of electronic com- 
puters and automatic machines in the area of accounting, economics, man- 
agement, marketing and general business. The equipment and facilities of 
the Guidance Center Laboratory are utilized in the course. Three two-hour 
class periods per week. Prerequisites: Statistics, Cost Accounting or Inter- 
mediate Accounting. 



COURSES IN BUSINESS EDUCATION 

436. Methods of Teaching Skill Subjects. Credit 5(5-0) 
Analysis and evaluation of objectives, materials and methods of teaching 

typewriting, shorthand, transcription and related office skills. Provision is 
made for observation and participation in demonstration teaching. Pre- 
requisites: Education 301, Psychology 302. 

437. Methods of Teaching Business Subjects. Credit 5(5-0) 
Selection, organization, and evaluation of supplementary teaching ma- 
terials and analysis of techniques in teaching bookkeeping, general business, 
business law, business structure, and elementary economics. Construction of 
teaching units, enrichment materials and lesson plans for effective teaching 
on the secondary level. Prerequisite: Education 301, Psychology 302. 

452. Observation and Directed Teaching. Credit 10 hrs. 

Observation and student teaching in selected accredited secondary schools. 

Is part of the Professional Education Block. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 



School of Engineering 209 

COURSES IN SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

101. Typewriting I. Credit 2(0-5) 
Designed to develop a working knowledge of the use of the typewriter 

toward final mastery of keyboard reaches with drills, simple problems, etc. 
Requirement: 30 GWAM. 

102. Typewriting II. Credit 2(0-5) 
Further development of skill through typewritten reproduction of more 

difficult problem materials. Requirement: 50 GWAM. Prerequisite: Type- 
writing 101. 

103. Typewriting III. Credit 2(0-5) 
Emphasis on technical typewriting, tabulation reports, and other ad- 
vanced practical applications. Requirement: 60 GWAM. Prerequisite: Type- 
writing 102. 

104. Typewriting IV. Credit 2(0-5) 
Emphasis on developing the highest possible skill in the use of the type- 
writer. Speed and accuracy are thoroughly emphasized through effective 
techniques of control. Requirement: 60 NWAM. Prerequisite: Typewriting 
103. 

201. Gregg Shorthand I. Credit 3(5-0) 
Study of theory as outlined in Gregg Shorthand Manual (Simplified). 

Requirement: 60 WAM. 

202. Gregg Shorthand II. Credit 3(5-0) 
Continuation of 201 (with added emphasis on dictation of simple letters 

and documents). Requirement: 70 WAM on new matter. 

203. Gregg Shorthand III. Credit 3(5-0) 
Emphasis is placed on difficult dictation and transcription, speed tests, 

and reporting speeches. Requirement: 80 WAM on new matter. 

204. Business Machines. Credit 2(0-4) 
Develops knowledge and skill in the use of equipment found in the 

modern office. Prerequisite: Sec. Sc. 103. 

302. Transcription I. Credit 3(0-6) 
Designed to review techniques of and to coordinate the skills of typewrit- 
ing, shorthand, and English and to promote desirable habits of performance. 
Requirement: The production of mailable transcripts. 

303. Transcription II. Credit 3(0-5) 
Emphasis placed on advanced dictation take rates and transcription rates. 

Requirement; The production of mailable transcripts. 

304. Transcription III. Credit 3(0-5) 
Speed building emphasis and further development of skill to take dicta- 
tion and transcribe at maximum rates to satisfy the requirements of busi- 
ness. Requirement: The production of mailable transcripts. 

310. Filing. Credit 2(0-4) 

Introduces the student to the basic systems of business filing. 



210 The Agricultural and Technical College 

403. Secretarial Training. Credit 3(3-0) 
Discusses the qualifications, duties and responsibilities of the secretary 

in the modern business office. 

404. Secretarial Internship. Credit 2(1-10) 
A field work of observation and work in selected business firms. Designed 

to contribute materially to the total development of the student's educa- 
tional experiences. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 



DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Arm and Richardson, Chairman 



The courses offered in the Department of Electrical Engineering are de- 
signed to serve the following purposes: 

1. To provide understanding of and comprehensive training in the im- 
portant natural laws and concepts in the physical and engineering 
sciences. 

2. To encourage the student to look for ways of correlating and integrat- 
ing fundamental knowledge; to think clearly and logically; and to 
learn to apply his knowledge to new situations. 

3. To develop skills in the proper methods of communication of ideas 
through use of language; to develop ability to portray ideas in draw- 
ings and sketches; and to develop facility in the use of mathematics. 

4. To develop skills in the analysis and synthesis of electrical and elec- 
tronic systems and to encourage originality and creative ability wher- 
ever possible. 

5. To extend classroom work with laboratory experiences designed to: 

(a) confirm theoretical concepts 

(b) develop facility in the use of measuring instruments 

(c) give the student the chance to observe actual engineering devices 
in action 

(d) develop the ability to work effectively in a group as both a leader 
and a member of the group in accomplishing specific engineering 
objectives 

(e) gain additional facility in the use of the language of engineering. 

6. To encourage the student to appreciate life-long learning, with com- 
pletion of undergraduate study just one step in the process of con- 
tinuous education. 

7. To prepare the graduate engineer to be a respected citizen in his 
community and to have an appreciation for such values as those termed 
social, artistic, and economic, which will help him become a worthy 
member of the profession. 



School of Engineering 



211 



Program for Electrical Engineering Major 
Freshman Year 

(See First Year's Curricula for Engineering) 



Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter 

Mathematics 221, 222, 223 5 5 

Physics 201, 202, 203 5 5 

Electrical Engineering 224, 225, 226 4 4 

Mechanical Engineering 200 — 2 

Humanities 201, 202, 203 3 3 

ROTC 2 2 

19 21 

Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Electrical Engineering 331, 332, 333 3 

Electrical Engineering 334, 335 2 

Electrical Engineering 336 — 

Electrical Engineering 344 — 

Mechanical Engineering 311, 312, 313 5 

Mathematics 231 5 

Economics 310 — 

*Electives 6 

21 

Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Electrical Engineering 446, 447, 448 4 

Electrical Engineering 455, 456, 457 4 

Electrical Engineering 460, 461 — 

Electrical Engineering 434 3 

Mechanical Engineering 301, 302, 303 3 

*Electives 3 

17 17 



Spring 
5 
5 
4 

3 
2 

19 



Winter 


Spring 


3 


3 


2 


— 


— 


3 


4 


— 


5 


5 





5 


6 


3 


20 


19 


Winter 


Spring 


4 


4 


4 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


6 



20 



COURSES IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Undergraduate 

224, 225, 226. Introduction to Electrical Engineering. Credit 4(3-3) each 
A first course for electrical engineering students; electric and magnetic 
concepts and units; motional electromagnetic forces; electric fields and 
forces; electrochemistry; introduction to electronics. Coordinated laboratory 
work. Corequisites: Phy. 203, Math. 221. 

331, 332, 333. Electric Circuit Analysis. Credit 3(3-0) each 

Fundamentals of linear circuit analysis; sinusoidal steady state; coupled 
circuit theory; balanced and unbalanced polyphase circuits; harmonic 
analysis and fourier series; transients; the laplace transform. Prerequisites: 
Math. 223, E.E. 226, or consent of instructor. 

* Nine hours of electives must be in Social Studies. Social Studies 101, 102, 103 are 
recommended. 



212 The Agricultural and Technical College 

334, 335. Electrical Measurements. Credit 2(1-3) each 

Instruments and techniques for measuring electrical and magnetic quan- 
tities; galvanometers, d-c bridges; potentiometers; a-c bridges; magnetic 
measurements; measurement of power. Prerequisite: E.E. 226 or Phy. 340. 

336. Principles of Electromagnetic Fields. Credit 3(3-0) 

The basic postulates of electromagnetism; the integral laws in free space; 
the differential laws in free space; static fields; time varying fields. Pre- 
requisites: Math. 223, E.E. 332. 

344. Basic Electronics. Credit 4(3-3) 

Electron Ballistics; thermionic, high field, and photoemission as applied 
to vacuum tubes, semiconductors, gas-filled tubes, and specialized tubes; 
coordinated laboratory work. Prerequisites: E.E. 331, Math. 223. 

421, 422, 423. Basic Electrical Engineering. Credit 4(3-3) each 

Electrical engineering fundamentals and applications for non-electrical 
engineering students, a-c and d-c circuits and machinery; electron tubes 
and applications; electro-chemical processes; coordinated laboratory work. 
Prerequisites: Phy. 203, Math. 223. 

434. Electrical Transients. Credit 3(3-0) 

Transient and steady state solutions of electrical networks and electro- 
mechanical systems using the laplace transform, fourier integrals, and 
analogs. Prerequisites: Math. 231, E.E. 333, or consent of instructor. 

445. Radio Circuits. Credit 4(1-6) 
Special topics and laboratory work of special interest to the student; 

most of the work is given by the project method. Prerequisite: E.E. 344. 

446, 447, 448. Electronic Engineering. Credit 4(3-3) 
Principles of electronic circuits; rectifiers and filters; amplifiers; feedback 

and oscillatory systems; modulation and demodulation; wave shaping cir- 
cuits; receiving and transmitting systems: Techniques using semiconduc- 
tors, vacuum tubes, and gas-filled tubes are employed throughout the 
courses. Coordinated laboratory work with industrial applications and spe- 
cial projects. Prerequisite: E.E. 344. 

451. Power Transmission Lines. Credit 4(4-0) 
Long distance transmission of power; determination of distributed line 

parameters; general circuit constants and equations; circle diagrams as 
applied to long distance power lines. Prerequisites: E.E. 332, Math. 231. 

452. Automatic Control Theory. Credit 3(3-0) 
The automatic control problem; review of operational calculus: typical 

control elements and their transfer functions; steady state and transient 
solutions of feedback control system differential equations; stability; Ny- 
quist criterion for stability; types of servomechanisms and control systems, 
design principles. Prerequisites: E.E. 434, or the consent of the instructor. 

455, 456, 457. Electric Machinery. Credit 4(3-3) each 

Principles of electric energy converters; application of circuit theory 
to electric apparatus; characteristics of transformers, direct-current ma- 
chines, induction and synchronous machines, and power rectifiers and inver- 
ters; thermoelectric generators. Coordinated laboratory work. Prerequisite: 
E.E. 333. 

460, 461. Electromagnetic Wave Theory. Credit 3(3-0) each 

Fundamental electronic concepts at ultra-high frequencies; analysis of 
transmission lines and networks; Maxwell's equations and their applications; 
reflecting phenomena; wave guides and radiating systems. Prerequisite: 
E.E. 336. 






School of Engineering 213 

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Charles W. Pinckney, Chairman 



OBJECTIVES : The Department of Industrial Education offers training to 
prepare individuals for professional employment in two basic categories. 
First, it prepares teachers of industrial arts and vocational industrial 
courses for public school service and offers additional training to such 
in-service teachers. Second, it provides practical training to individuals 
interested in industrial and business employment in such work as sales, 
personnel, production line management, maintenance and estimating. The 
department's undergraduate program consists of two curricula leading to a 
Bachelor of Science degree in these respective fields and a minor curricu- 
lum leading to teacher certification in vocational industrial education. 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION 

Industrial arts, as a phase of secondary school offerings, provides learn- 
ing experiences which assist boys and girls to understand the industrial, 
technical and consumer aspects of life today. The course work includes a 
study of changes made in materials to make them more useful and to 
problems attending these changes. Laboratory work in an industrial arts 
program is concerned with the processes of changing these materials to 
useful products. 

College students who are interested in majoring in this area should have 
an active interest in industrial materials, processes and products in such 
areas as wood, metals, electricity and drafting. They should be challenged 
by experiences that develop technical skills and knowledge relating to labor 
and industrial occupations. A strong interest in working with high school 
youth is important to success in this field. 

VOCATIONAL INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Vocational industrial education, as a phase of secondary school offerings, 
deals with training individuals for gainful employment in trade and indus- 
trial occupations. The program may be offered to youth and/or adults 
through day-trade, part-time or evening vocational classes. 

College students who are interested in becoming a teacher of a trade in 
the state's public schools must have had two years working experience in 
that trade beyond the learning period. For such students our curriculum 
provides up to 18 quarter hours of professional courses in industrial educa- 
tion which will qualify him to teach in this area. (The higher classes of 
teacher certification require a college degree in addition to trade experience 
and professional courses in industrial education.) 

A high interest in the trade and in working with people is necessary for 
success in this field. 



214 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



This minor curriculum is selected from such courses as follows: 

Principles of Vocational Education and Guidance 6 cr. hrs. 

Materials Equipment and Shop Management 3 cr. hrs. 

Foundations, History and Philosophy of Ind. Ed 6 cr. hrs. 

Trade Analysis, Teaching Problems and 

Methods in Ind. Ed 12 cr. hrs. 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION TECHNICAL OPTION 

Persons interested in professional employment in vocations, other than 
teaching, that require a general technical background, may be prepared 
through this technical option curriculum. It provides broad general and 
technical training with an opportunity to select business courses related to 
the student's vocational objective. 

The ability to communicate effectively, particularly industrial and tech- 
nical literacy, and facility in working with people are necessary to success 
in this field. 

OPPORTUNITIES : Opportunities for employment of graduates are very 
good in North Carolina and neighboring states. Graduates are also prepared 
to enter graduate schools should they desire to do further study. 

GRADUATE STUDY: Opportunities are provided for qualified students 
to do graduate work leading to the Master of Science degree in Industrial 
Education. Courses are also provided for in-service teachers interested 
in upgrading and certificate renewal. For further information write the 
department or the Dean of the Graduate School. 



Suggested Program for Industrial Arts Education Major 
Freshman Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Industrial Education 125 — — 3 

Science Electives 5 5 — 

Mathematics 111, 112, 113 5 5 5 

English 101, 102, 103 5 5 5 

Mechanical Engineering 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

Electives* 1 1 1 

Physical Education Electives 1 1 1 

Humanities 201 — — 3 

20 20 21 

Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Industrial Arts 221, 222, 223 5 5 5 

Industrial Arts 231, 232, 233 3 3 3 

Industrial Arts 226, 227, 228 3 3 3 

Industrial Education 224, 231 3 3 — 

English 210 — — 3 

Physics 201, 202 5 5 — 

Psychology 201 — — 5 

Electives* 2 2 2 

21 21 21 

* Freshman and sophomore male students who are not veterans are required to enroll 
in air science or military science each quarter of their freshman and sophomore years. 



School of Engineering 



215 



Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Technical Elective 3 3 3 

Social Science 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

Industrial Arts 338, 339, 349 3 3 3 

Industrial Arts 334, 335, 336 4 4 4 

Industrial Education 332 3 — — 

Psychology 203, 301 — 3 3 

Electives 3 3 3 



19 



19 



19 



Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Art 111, 112 3 

Health Education 234 3 

Industrial Education 441, 443 3 

Industrial Education 502 — 

Industrial Education 447 — 

Education 301 — 

Psychology 302 3 

Industrial Education 444 — 

Electives 3 

15 



Winter 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 



3 

18 



Spring 



10 

3 

13 



Suggested Program for Industrial Education Technical Option Major 
Freshman Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Mathematics 111, 112, 113 5 5 5 

Chemistry 101, 102 5 5 — 

English 101, 102, 103 5 5 5 

Mech. Eng. 101, 102, 103 3 3 3 

Physical Education Electives 1 1 1 

Elective* 1 1 1 

Industrial Education 125 — — 3 



20 



20 



18 



Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Industrial Arts 221. 222 5 

Industrial Arts 231, 232, 233 3 

Industrial Arts 226, 227, 228 3 

Physics 201, 202 — 

Ind. Ed. 224 3 

Physical Education Electives 1 

Humanities 201 — 

Soc. Sc. 101. 102, 103 3 

Elective* 2 



Winter 
5 
3 
3 
5 



Spring 

3 
3 
5 

1 
3 
3 
2 



20 



21 



20 



* Freshman and sophomore male students who are not veterans are required to enroll 
in air science or military science each quarter of their freshman and sophomore years. 



216 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

English 210 — 

Industrial Arts 334, 335, 336 4 

Business Electives 3 

Industrial Education 333, Psy. 201 5 

Phy. Ed — 

Technical Electives 3 

Electives 3 

18 



Winter 

4 
3 
3 
1 
3 
3 

17 



Spring 
3 
4 
3 



16 



Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Technical Electives 5 

Business and Economics Electives 3 

Industrial Education 447 — ■ 

Art 111, 112, 113 3 

Estimating BC 335, BC 336 3 

Mech. Eng. 450 — 

Psy. 403 — 

Electives 3 

17 



Winter 
5 
3 
3 
3 
3 



20 



Spring 
3 
3 



20 



COURSES IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS 
Undergraduate 

111. Introduction to Leather Craft. Credit 3(0-6) 
Fundamentals of materials, tools and skills used in leather craft. 

112. Designs and Assembling Leather Craft. Credit 3(0-6) 
Continuation of I. A. Ill — advanced projects constructed. 

113. Carving and Stamping Leather Craft. Credit 3(0-6) 
Continuation of I. A. 112 — advanced carving and stamping. 

221. General Woodwork. Credit 5(1-8) 
Care and use of hand tools, principles of planning, squaring and laying 

out work. Special projects assigned to students in accordance with the 
student's skill. 

222. General Woodwork. Credit 5(1-8) 
Emphasis on the practical operation of power tools. Prerequisite: I. A. 221. 

223. Advanced Woodwork. Credit 5(1-8) 
Construction of projects from drawings or blueprints. Care of power 

machines, saw filing, band saw brazing, sharpening and setting planer 
knives. Prerequisite: LA. 222. 

226. Electric Wiring. Credit 3(0-6) 

A study of the fundamental principles of two-and three-wire circuits for 
light and power. The study and use of electrical wiring materials and elec- 
trical codes. 



School of Engineering 217 

227. General Electricity. Credit 3(0-6) 
Instruction and laboratory practice covering fundamental principles of 

direct and of alternating current equipment. Study of meters, motors, gene- 
rators, armature winding and alternating current circuits. Study of home 
appliances an integral part of the course. 

228. Electricity (Radio). Credit 3(0-6) 
Theory and fundamentals of radio communication circuits, and power 

supplies. Testing of standard circuits, radio repair and code practice. Pre- 
requisites: I. A. 226, 227. 

231. Industrial Arts Drawing. Credit 3(0-6) 
A course for acquisition of information and development of skills needed 

by a teacher in industrial arts drafting. Utilization and explanation of 
modern techniques for teaching drawing at various levels in high school or 
vocational school. Instruction in A.S.A. conventions, projections, revolutions, 
developments, lettering and pictorial representation with reference to ma- 
chine and woodworking drawing. Prerequisite: M.E. 102. 

232. Industrial Arts Drawing. Credit 3(0-6) 
Problems in sheetmetal drawing, shading, technical sketching, production 

illustration and industrial arts design. Prerequisite: I. A. 231. 

233. Industrial Arts Drawing. Credit 3(0-6) 
Basic elements in the planning and construction of residential buildings. 

Problems in floor plans, elevations, details and perspective. Study of kitchen, 
living room, dining room, bath room and bed room layout. Prerequisite: 
LA. 232. 

330. Repair and Maintenance of Home Furniture. Credit 3(0-6) 

A course designed to help homemaking teachers meet specific problems 
in the improvement and care of home furniture. Instruction in simple up- 
holstery techniques and other processes using tools and accessories for home 
repair. Finishing and refmishing wood. Students encouraged to make an 
effort to provide their own work projects. 

334. General Metals. Credit 4(2-4) 
A general introduction to machine shop methods. Operation of the lathe, 

milling machine, drill press, shaper and grinding of cutting tools. Heat 
treating of metals. Projects involving basic operations of each machine. 
Special emphasis is put on machine maintenance and machine shop calcula- 
tions as well as related information. 

335. General Metals. Credit 4(2-4) 
Fundamental machine and hand tool operations; care, use, and adjustment 

of sheet metal equipment; the development of simple patterns. Projects in- 
volving art metal, metal spinning, soft and hard solder, raising, chasing, 
seaming, piercing, etching, coloring and other processes useful to teachers 
of metal shops. Study of related technical information; sources, cost and 
specifications of equipment and supplies. 

336. General Metals. Credit 4(2-4) 
General activities in metal work including ornamental iron, tool forging, 

elementary foundry, bench metal, oxyacetylene welding and cutting. Study of 
related technical information; shop organization, courses of study, layout, 
equipment, operation, uses of instructional materials and supplies. 



218 The Agricultural and Technical College 

338. Woodturning. Credit 3(0-6) 
Thorough drill in the cutting action of turning tools and methods of 

holding them. Projects in spindle and in face plate turning are selected 
for practice. Finishing and polishing on the lathe. 

339. Upholstery. Credit 3(0-6) 
Instruction in caning and seat weaving method of upholstering a plain 

board surface, methods of fastening webbing, burlap and its uses, upholstery 
with springs, hard-edge upholstery, and spring edge upholstery. 

340. Wood Finishing. Credit 3(0-6) 
Mechanical preparation of wood before staining, preparation and use of 

stains and the application of different classes of commercial stains, kinds of 
fillers — their preparation and application, refinishing. 

348. Comprehensive Shop Projects. Credit 3(0-6) 
General construction, repairs, maintenance work or advanced projects in- 
volving wood turning, carving, inlaying, upholstering and wood finishing. 

349. General Shop. Credit 3(0-6) 
Purpose and organization of general shops, instructional materials and 

procedures. Shop operating problems including personnel organization and 
equipment selection, project construction on a general shop basis. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

506. Plastic Craft. Credit 3(2-2) 
For teachers of industrial arts, arts and crafts and those interested in 

plastics as a hobby. Operations in plastics analyzed and demonstrated; de- 
sign, color, kinds and uses of plastics, how plastics are made and sold; voca- 
tional information. Projects suitable for class use constructed. 

507. Advanced Plastic Craft. Credit 3(2-2) 
A continuation of 506, including blow forming and internal carving. 

508. Handicrafts. Credit 3(2-2) 
For teachers of Industrial Arts, arts and crafts and those interested in 

craft work as a hobby. Covers the materials, tools and processes used in, 
and craft activities carried on in elementary and junior high schools that do 
not have specialized shops. Also of value to grade teachers who feel the 
necessity for more information regarding the materials, tools, and processes 
frequently employed in an activity-type program. 

509. Advanced Handicrafts. Credit 3(2-2) 
A continuation of 508. Instruction in advanced handicraft techniques. 

510. Advanced General Metals I. Credit 3 Hrs. 3(2-2) 
An advanced course in metalwork for teachers of industrial arts and 

others interested in metalwork as a hobby. Emphasis will center on art 
metal (including plating, finishes, etc.), advanced bench metal and sheet 
metal operations. Specifications of equipment, organization of instruction 
sheets, special problems, and materials will be covered as well as shop 
organization. Prerequisite: I. A. 336 or equivalent. 

511. Advanced General Metals II. Credit 3 Hrs. 3(2-2) 
An advanced course in machine tool operation for the industrial arts 

teacher who may want more specialization in one area of metalwork. Ad- 
vanced operations on the lathe, shaper, milling machine, etc. Specifications 
of equipment, materials and organization of instruction materials. Pre- 
requisite: I. A. 336 or equivalent. 



School of Engineering 219 

512. Advanced General Metals III. Credit 3 Hrs. 3(2-2) 

Special problems in metalwork. With the necessary prerequisites, the 
student may select problems in any area of general metals for special 
study. Construction of projects, special assignments, etc. will be made after 
the area of work is selected and after consultation with the instructor. Pre- 
requisite: I. A. 510. 

Graduate 

These courses are open only to graduate students. For descriptions of 
them, see the bulletin of the Graduate School. 

608. Advanced Furniture Design and Construction. Credit 3(2-2) 

609. Electricity for Industrial Arts Teachers. Credit 3(2-2) 

611. Graphic Arts Problems. Credit 3(2-2) 

612. Laboratory Problems in Industrial Arts. Credit 3(2-2) 

613. Comprehensive General Shop. Credit 3(2-2) 

614. Advanced Drafting Techniques. Credit 3(2-2) 
623. Construction and Use of Instructional Aids. Credit 3(2-2) 

COURSES IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Undergraduate 

125. Foundations of Industrial Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

An orientation course for industrial education freshmen. Course require- 
ments program operation, regulation. Familiarizes the student with the 
underlying philosophy, basic principles, and prevailing practices and termi- 
nology in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education. 

224. Organization, Materials & Processes of Industry. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the function, organization, materials and processes of in- 
dustry. The course includes the study of techniques used by management 
to strengthen the efficiency of industrial operation. 

231. Vocational Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

Study of principles, practices, philosophy types and problems of federally 
aided vocational education programs. Special consideration given to agencies, 
their organization and responsibilities at the state and national levels. 

332. Vocational Guidance. Credit 3(3-0) 
The problems of vocational guidance, its beginning organization and 

administration in high schools. Special attention to guidance in the Junior 
and Senior high school as it relates to the work of Industrial Arts. 

333. Shop Safety Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
This course provides the necessary lesson units and methods of teaching 

school shop safety as well as plans for developing complete shop safety 
education programs. 

441. Trade Analysis. Credit 3(3-0) 

Methods of analyzing occupations for the purpose of securing teaching 
content and determining instructional order. Trade elements analyzed and 
instructional content. Methods of developing elements into courses and prep- 
aration of instruction sheets. 



220 The Agricultural and Technical College 

443. Methods of Teaching Industrial Education. Credit 5(5-0) 
Methods of presenting related information, procedures in giving demon- 
strations with tools and machines, testing and grading shop work, organiza- 
tion of subject matter and lesson planning. 

444. Observation and Student Teaching in Industrial Education. 

Credit 10(10-0) 
Practice experience in conducting unit trade and industrial arts pro- 
grams will be offered. 

447. Materials, Equipment and Shop Management. Credit 3(3-0) 

Discussion of problems of equipping and arranging trades and industrial 
arts shops and the care of tools and materials, safety and management. 

Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate 

502. Teaching Problems in Industrial Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

A general methods course for industrial education students. Problems 
involve analysis of objectives, curriculum content, text and reference books, 
teaching aids and devices, remedial instructions, cumulative records, storage 
systems, organizing class, teaching plans, safety programs, storage systems 
information about students, demonstration. Prerequisites: Ed. 341, I. A. 347. 

504. History and Philosophy of Industrial Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

Chronological and philosophical development of industrial education with 
special emphasis on its growth and function in American schools. 

520. Diversified Occupations Programs. Credit 3(3-0) 
A course designed to give the prospective teachers of vocational educa- 
tion a knowledge of the basic concepts and processes of co-operative work 
in general, with special attention to diversified occupations. 

521. Organization of Related Study Material. Credit 3(3-0) 
The principles of selecting and organizing both technical and general 

related instructional material for trade extension and diversified occupa- 
tions classes. 

Graduate 

These courses are open only to graduate students. For descriptions of 
them, see the bulletin of the Graduate School. 

604. Supervision and Administration of Industrial Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

605. Curriculum Laboratory in Industrial Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

606. Research and Literature in Industrial Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
624. Laboratory Planning for Industrial Shops. Credit 3(3-0) 

631. General Industrial Education Programs. Credit 3(3-0) 

632. Testing in Industrial Subjects. Credit 3(3-0) 



School of Engineering 221 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Theodore R. Sykes, Chairman 



Objectives of the Department of Mathematics are as follows: 

1. To review and strengthen students in the basic fundamentals of mathe- 
matics in order that they may be adequately equipped for expressing 
or interpreting quantitative ideas in this and related areas. 

2. To provide an opportunity for all students to increase their sense 
of utility of the subject matter by emphasizing the application of 
mathematical processes to problems involving personal and social 
living. 

3. To equip those students whose interests and abilities lead to further 
study, research and /or technology with an adequate mathematical 
background. 

4. To contribute to the teaching efficiency of prospective secondard school 
mathematics teachers by insuring mastery of essential subject matter 
materials, and the development of a reasonable degree of skill, ac- 
curacy and speed in dealing with these materials. 

Graduation Requirements: 

Candidates for the B.S. degree in mathematics and those for the B.S. 
in engineering mathematics must complete 220 hours of work approved 
by the School of Engineering and the Department of Mathematics, and 
pass a comprehensive examination in mathematics. This examination should 
be scheduled the quarter preceding the quarter in which the student ex- 
pects to graduate. 

Required Courses for Freshmen and Sophomores: 

Math. Ill, 112, 113, 221, 222, 223 30 hrs. 

English 101, 102, 103, 210 18 hrs. 

Physics 201, 202, 203 15 hrs. 

Chemistry 101, 102, 103 15 hrs. 

Foreign Language (French or German) 15 hrs. 

Physical Education 6 hrs. 

Mech. Eng. 101, 102 103 (Engineering Math, only) 9 hrs. 

Humanities (Math majors Only) 9 hrs. 

Electives* 6 to 9 hrs. 

114 to 117 hrs. 

* Freshman and sophomore male students who are not veterans are required to enroll 
in air or military science each quarter , of their freshman and sophomore years. Female 
prospective mathematics teachers should include Psychology 201 and, if possible, Educa- 
tion 201. 



222 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



Suggested Program for Mathematics Major 

Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Mathematics 218, 511, 512 5 3 3 

Mathematics 502, Math. Electives, 400 series 3 3/5 2 

Economics 231, 232 — 5 5 

Education 201, 202, Guidance 501 3 3 3 

Psychology 203, 301, 302 3 3 3 

Electives 6 — 3 

20 17-19 19 



Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Mathematics 513, 508 3 

Mathematics 503, Math. Electives 3 

History 230 or 310, 220 5 

Health Education 234 — 

Electives 5 

19 



Winter 
3 
3 
5 
3 



19 



Spring 

10 
10 



Suggested Program for Engineering Mathematics Major 

Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter 

Mechanical Engineering 311, 312, 313 5 5 

Mathematics 218, 513, 514 5 3 

Mathematics 231, Math. Electives 5 3 

Mechanical Engineering 301, 302, 

Physics 370 or 380 3 3 

Electives — 6 

18 20 



Spring 
5 
3 
3 

3/5 
4/6 

20 



Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Mathematics 506, 507, 520 5 

Economics 310, 312 5 

Electives 6 

Mathematics Elective — 

16 



Winter 
5 
5 
6 



16 



Spring 
5 

8 
3 

16 



COURSES MATHEMATICS 

109. Remedial Mathematics. Credit 3(3-2) 

Review of fundamentals of basic mathematics and development of basic 
concepts. Required of entering students who do not pass the mathematics 
placement test. 

111. College Algebra. Credit 5(5 0) 

Review of elementary algebra. Also, study of quadratics, simultaneous 
quadratic equations, binomial theorem, progressions, determinants and 
permutation. Prerequisite: High School Algebra. 



School of Engineering 223 

112. Plane Trigonometry. Credit 5(5-0) 
A general course in plane trigonometry with emphasis placed on the 

analytical concepts of the subject. Prerequisite: Math. 111. 

113. Analytic Geometry. Credit 5(5-0) 
A thorough study of cartesian co-ordinates, plane curves, loci, polar co- 
ordinates and conic sections. Prerequisite: Math. 112. 

115. Mathematics of Finance. Credit 5(5-0) 

Applications of basic algebra to commercial problems, functions and 
graphs, logarithms, and essential statistical concepts. Simple and compound 
interest, simple discounts, annuities, and life insurance. Bond valuation and 
depreciation. Prerequisite: Math. 111. 

214. History of Mathematics. Credit 5(5-0) 

A survey of the development of mathematics by chronological periods, 
with biographical references, illustrations of national and racial achieve- 
ments, and discussions of the evolution of certain important topics of ele- 
mentary mathematics. Prerequisite: Math. 222. 

216. Theory of Equations. Credit 5(5-0) 

Methods of solving cubics, quartics and other higher algebraic equations. 
Methods of approximating roots, systems of equations, elements of determi- 
nants. Prerequisite: Math. 223. 

218. Elementary Mathematical Statistics. Credit 5(5-0) 

A general course covering fundamentals of statistics, central tendencies, 
variabilities, graphic methods, frequency distributions, correlations, re- 
liability of measures, theory and methods of sampling, and the descriptive 
and analytical measures of statistics. Prerequisite: Math. 111. 

221, 222, 223. Differential and Integral Calculus. Credit 5(5-0) each 

A unified course covering the fundamentals of differential and integral 
calculus with applications. Prerequisite: Math. 113. 

231. Differential Equations. Credit 5(5-0) 

Solution of standard types of differential equations, with applications in 
electricity and mechanics. Prerequisite: Math. 223. 

301. Introduction to the Programming of 

Digital Computers. Credit 3 hrs. 3(3-0) 

Flow charts, machine language, e.g. FORTRAN, preparation of cards and 
tapes, number systems, typical programs for solution on standard com- 
puters. Mathematical essentials for computer programming; e.g. approxi- 
mation methods, error functions, iteration schemes, and numerical solutions 
of equations. 

317. Solid Analytic Geometry. Credit 3 hrs. 3(3-0) 

A study of curves, lines and planes in space, quadric surfaces, and trans- 
formations. Prerequisite: Math. 113. 

400. Seminar in Mathematics. Credit 2 hrs. 2(2-0) 

Methods of preparing and presenting seminars, presentation of seminars 
in current developments in mathematics and/ or topics of interest which are 
not included in formal courses. Required of mathematics majors in teacher 
education program. Prerequisite: Thirty hours of college mathematics. 



224 The Agricultural and Technical College 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

500. Integrated Mathematics. Credit 3(3-0) 
Definition and properties of elementary function, integration theory, 

sequences and series. Graduate students who do poorly on the admissions 
examination must schedule this course. No credit toward a degree in mathe- 
matics. 

501. Algebraic Equations for Teachers. Credit 3(3-0) 
Polynominals, linear systems, determinants and matrices methods of solv- 
ing linear systems. No credit toward a degree in mathematics. Prerequisites: 
Thirty hours of college mathematics. 

502. Modern Mathematics for High School Teachers. Credit 3(3-0) 
Elements of mathematical logic and deductive reasoning, the concept of 

number, ordinal and cardinal numbers, structure of the real number system. 
Prerequisites: Thirty quarter hours of college mathematics. 

503. Intermediate Analysis I. Credit 3(3-0) 
A rigorous study of the fundamental principles of the calculus including 

properties of the real number system, limits, continuity, differentiality, 
integrability, sequences and series, functions of several variables. Pre- 
requisite: Math. 223. 

504. Intermediate Analysis II. Credit 3(3-0) 
Continuation of Mathematics 503. Prerequisite: Math. 503. 

505. Intermediate Analysis III. Credit 3(3-0) 
Continuation of Mathematics 504. Prerequisite: Math. 504. 

506. Mathematical Methods in Science and Engineering I. Credit 5(5-0) 
Fourier series and orthogonal functions, integration theory, operational 

and transform calculi, elements of complex variables, calculus of variation, 
several variables, special functions, elements of matrix theory. Prerequisite: 
Math. 231. 

507. Mathematical Methods in Science and Engineering II. Credit 5(5-0) 
Orthogonal functions, boundary value problems, operational calculus, so- 
lution of partial differential equations. Prerequisite: Math. 506. 

508. College Geometry. Credit 3(3-0) 
Properties of sets, operation on sets, elements of symbolic logic, proper- 
ties of postulational system, the defects of Euclid's system, the Hilbert 
axioms, a general survey of the axioms of non-Euclidean systems. Pre- 
requisite: High school geometry and thirty hours of college mathematics. 

509. Mathematics for Chemists. Credit 5(5-0) 
This course will review those principles of mathematics which are in- 
volved in chemical computations and derivations from general through phy- 
sical chemistry. It will include a study of significant figures, methods of 
expressing large and small numbers, algebraic operations, trigonometric 
functions, and an introduction to calculus. 

510. Arithmetic for Elementary Teachers. Credit 3(3-0) 
This course affords a background of the beginning numbers, concepts and 

counting, a study of various number bases, and fundamental processes and 
their application and problem solving. No credit toward a degree in mathe- 
matics. 



School of Engineering 225 

511. Abstract Algebra I. Credit 3(3-0) 
Elementary properties of sets, Peano axioms and the construction of the 

natural number system, properties of the integers, integral domains, groups, 
rings, fields, vector spaces, lattices and partially ordered sets. Prerequisite: 
Math. 501. 

512. Abstract Algebra II. Credit 3(3-0) 
Continuation of Mathematics 511. Prerequisite: Math. 511. 

513. Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory I. Credit 3(3-0) 
Real and complex finite dimensional vector spaces, conjugate spaces, 

theory of linear transformation, linear operations, matrices, canonical rep- 
resentations, infinite dimensional space with an introduction to functional 
analysis. Prerequisite: Math. 223. 

514. Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory I. Credit 3(3-0) 
Continuation of Mathematics 513. Prerequisite: Math. 513. 

515. Elements of Set Theory and Topology. Credit 3(3-0) 
Operations on sets, relations, correspondences, comparison of sets, func- 
tions, ordered sets, general topological spaces, matric spaces, continuity, 
connectivity, compactness, homeomorphic spaces, general properties of 
Ti-spaces. Prerequisite: Math. 223, 511. 

516. Mathematical Statistics. Credit 3 hrs. 3(3-0) 
Introduction to probability, distribution functions and moment-generating 

functions, frequency distribution of two variables, development of chi- 
square, student's "t" and "F" distributions. Prerequisite: Math. 223. 

517. Methods of Applied Statistics. Credit 3 hrs. 3(3-0) 
Presents the bases of various statistical procedures. Applications of nor- 
mal, binomial, Poisson, chi-square, student's "t" and "f" distributions. Tests 
of hypotheses, power of tests, statistical inference, regression and correla- 
tion analysis and analysis of variance. Prerequisite: Math. 218. 

518. Mathematics of Life Insurance. Credit 3(3-0) 
Probability, mortality table, life insurance, annuities, endowments, com- 
putation of net premiums, evaluation of policies, construction and use of 
tables. Prerequisite: Math. 218. 

519. Numerical Computation. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 504.) 

Interpolation, numerical solution of equations, approximations, numerical 
integration, construction of tables. 

520. Vector Analysis. Credit 5(5-0) 
A study of the processes of vector analysis, with a treatment of the vec- 
tor functions and operations as applied in theoretical work. Prerequisite: 
Math. 506. 

521. Theory of Numbers. Credit 3 hrs. 3(3-0) 
Euclid algorithm, factorization, congruences, diophantine equations, num- 
ber-theoretic functions. Prerequisite: Thirty hours of college mathematics. 



226 The Agricultural and Technical College 

Graduate 

These courses are open only to graduate students. For descriptions of 
them, see the bulletin of the Graduate School. 

600. Theory of Functions of A Real Variable I. Credit 3(3-0) 

601. Theory of Functions of A Real Variable II. Credit 3(3-0) 

602. Theory of Function of A Complex Variable I. Credit 3(3-0) 

603. Theory of Function of A Complex Variable II. Credit 3(3-0) 

604. Projective Geometry. Credit 3(3-0) 

605. Special Topics in Algebra. Credit 3(3-0) 

606. Special Topics in Analysis. Credit 3(3-0) 

DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Hardy Liston, Jr., Chairman 



The Department of Mechanical Engineering directs its activities toward 
the attainment of the following objectives: 

1. To provide a broad program of studies which will prepare the student 
for gainful admission to employment in the field of mechanical engi- 
neering. 

2. To provide the student with appreciations, understandings and funda- 
mental information in the engineering sciences and of their relation- 
ships in industrial applications. 

3. To provide the student with background and professional knowledge 
for the application of basic sciences in engineering. 

4. To broaden the perspective of the student to know his responsibility 
to society and the engineering profession. 

5. To challenge the student to increasing levels of competence in dis- 
ciplines related to his chosen field. 

The means of attaining these objectives are: 

Lectures and class instruction supplemented by laboratory investigations 
designed to emphasize the engineering and economic principles involved, 
extensive use of visual aids and laboratory experiments employed to help 
the student get a clear understanding of many of the problems encountered 
in this area. 

Specific areas of instruction include machine design, engineering analysis, 
heating and air conditioning, thermodynamics, physical metallurgy, manu- 
facturing problems, heat engines, and fluid mechanics. 



School of Engineering 



227 



Program for Mechanical Engineering Major 
Freshman Year 

(See First Year Curricula for Engineering) 



Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Physics 201, 202, 203 5 

Mathematics 221, 222, 223 5 

Social Science 101, 102, 103 3 

Economics 310 5 

Mechanical Engineering 200, 210 — 

Mechanical Engineering 205, 220 — 

*ROTC or Elective 2 

20 

Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Mechanical Engineering 301, 302, 303 3 

Mechanical Engineering 311, 312, 313 5 

Mechanical Engineering 321, 320 3 

Humanities 201, 202, 203 3 

Mechanical Engineering 315 3 

Mathematics 231 — 

Economics 334 — 

*Electives 3 

20 



Winter 
5 
5 
3 

2 
3 
2 

20 



Winter 
3 
5 



3 

4 

18 



Spring 
5 
5 
3 

3 
3 

2 

21 



Spring 

3 
5 
1 
3 



20 



Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Electrical Engineering 421, 422, 423 4 

Mechanical Engineering 421, 422, 423 3 

Mechanical Engineering 411, 424, 412 3 

Mechanical Engineering 431, 432, 433 1 

Mechanical Engineering 429, 428, 450 2 

Mechanical Engineering 426 3 

Mechanical Engineering 441, 442, 443 1 

:!: Electives 3 

20 



Winter 
4 
3 
4 
1 
3 

1 
3 

19 



Spring 
4 
3 
3 
1 
3 

1 
3 

18 



COURSES IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 
Undergraduate 

101. Engineering Graphics. Credit 3(0-6) 

Instrument practice; lettering; geometrical construction; projections; sec- 



tions; auxiliary projections; revolution; 
development. 



pictorial drawing; intersection and 



102. Engineering Graphics. Credit 3(0-6) 

Drawing of fasteners, springs and gears; detail and assembly drawings; 
tracing and reproduction methods. Prerequisite: M.E. 101. 

* Electives may be selected from technical or non-technical fields related to Mechanical 
Engineering and will be subject to the approval of the junior and/or senior advisers. 



228 The Agricultural and Technical College 

103. Engineering Graphics. Credit 3(0-6) 

Representation of common geometrical magnitudes with points, lines, 
planes, and solids; concurrent noncoplanar forces; the solution of problems; 
advanced intersection and development. 

200. Introduction to Engineering Computations. Credit 2(0-4) 

General features of computations; accuracy of approximate calculations; 
logarithms, scales, alignment charts, the slide rule. Presentation of data; 
technical reports. Prerequisites: Math. 112, M.E. 102. 

205. Kinematics. Credit 3(2-2) 

A condensed course covering relative motions, velocities and accelerations 
of machine parts including linkages, cams and gears. Prerequisites: M.E. 
102, Math. 113, Phys. 201. 

210. Engineering Materials and Processes. Credit 3(3-0) 

Study of production methods and materials in engineering including cast- 
ings, .forgings, machine processes and finishing. The course will include 
lectures, visits to local plants and shops, audio visual aids, and standard 
reference data. Prerequisite: Chem. 101, M.E. 102, Math. 113. 

220. Plane Surveying. Credit 3(1-4) 

The methods of using the compass, transit, tape and level in making plane 
surveys. Lectures and field work. Elementary stadia work. Prerequisite: 
Math. 112. 

301. Thermodynamics I. Credit 3(3-0) 
A course in engineering thermodynamics including the fundamental prin- 
ciples of Energy Conversions, Thermometry, Specific Heats, The First and 
Second Laws of Thermodynamics, The Carnot Cycle, Fundamental Processes 
with Gases, Ideal Gases, Real Gases; Table and Nomographs. Prerequisite: 
Physics 202, Math. 223. 

302. Thermodynamics II. Credit 3(3-0) 
A continuation of Thermodynamics I, including the Second and Third 

Laws of Thermodynamics and their applications to fundamental processes. 
Differential Equations, Nomographs, Cyclic Processes, Equated Energy 
Transforms, some equipment, flow charts. Prerequisite: M.E. 301. 

303. Thermodynamics HI. Credit 3(3-0) 
A continuation of Thermodynamics II and to include thermodynamic sys- 
tems analysis and an introduction to heat transfer. Prerequisite: M.E. 302. 

311. Mechanics I, Statics. Credit 5(5-0) 
Statics, analytical and graphic treatment of systems of forces, couples, 

stresses in frames and trusses; distributed forces, centroids, moments of 
inertia. Prerequisites: Physics 201, Math. 223. 

312. Strength of Materials. Credit 5(5-0) 
Shear and bending moment diagrams, stresses in beams, shafts, and 

columns; combined stresses, deflection in beams, fiber stresses and their 
distribution; tension, compression, shear and torsion. Prerequisite: M.E. 311. 

313. Mechanics II, Dynamics. Credit 5(5-0) 
Dynamics and kinetics, rectilinear and curvilinear motion, relative velocity 

and acceleration, work and energy, impact, moment of momentum. Pre- 
requisite: M.E. 311. 



School of Engineering 229 

315, 316. Heating and Air Conditioning. Credit 3(3-0) each 

Principles of heating and air conditioning and their applications to the 
design of heating and air conditioning systems; study of principal equip- 
ment; design, layout and controls employed in various types of systems, 
Prerequisite: Physics 202. 

320. Mechanical Engineering Laboratory I. Credit 1(0-3) 
Calibrating pressure, speed, temperature and power measuring instru- 
ments; the testing of fuels, lubricants, pumps, compressors, heating, venti- 
lating, and refrigerating equipment. Prerequisites: M.E. 302, 315. 

321. Manufacturing Processes. Credit 3(2-2) 
The basic processes of conversion of raw materials into producer and 

consumer goods. Dimensional control; cutting and forming methods; tool- 
ing; cost reduction techniques using jigs and fixtures in volume production; 
laboratory consisting primarily of demonstrations. Prerequisite: M.E. 210. 

411. Fluid Mechanics. Credit 3(3-0) 
Principles of static and dynamic behavior of fluids with some applications 

to hydraulic machinery and structures. Prerequisite: M.E. 302. 

412. Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer. Credit 3(3-0) 
Fluid Properties and definitions, fluid flow concepts and basic equations, 

viscuous effects, frictionless compressible flow, flow in open channels. Con- 
duction of heat in the steady state and unsteady state; electrical analog; 
heat transfer by convection; heat transfer by radiation; heat transfer by 
the combined effect of conduction, convection and radiation, heat transfer 
and fluid friction, mass transfer. Prerequisites: M.E. 303, 411. 

421. Machine Design. Credit 3(3-0) 
Review of the properties of materials commonly used in machine con- 
struction; elementary stress analysis; combined stresses; working stresses. 
Prerequisites: M.E. 205, 312, 313. 

422, 423. Machine Design. Credit 3(2-2) each 
Synthesis of mechanical systems and devices. Specification of systems; 

region of design; synthesis of elements in the complete analysis of the 
assembly. Project work. Prerequisite: M.E. 421. 

424. Mechanical Vibration and Control. Credit 4(3-2) 

Free, damped and forced vibrations. Vibration isolation mounts, dampers 
and absorbers. Electromechanical analogies. Control systems. Laboratory 
in vibration of machine elements. Instrumentation for measuring force and 
motion. Prerequisites: Phys. 202, M.E. 422. 

426. Metallurgy. Credit 3(2-2) 

The production, constitution, and properties of ferrous and non-ferrous 
engineering metals and alloys; effects of mechanical working and heat 
treatment; corrosion and its prevention. Prerequisites: Chem. 102, M.E. 
210, 312. 

428. Heat Engines. Credit 3(3-0) 

Applications of thermodynamics and heat transfer in heat engines. Re- 
ciprocating and turbo-machinery; thermal and combustion engines. Working 
substances; energy conversion and control. Prerequisites: M.E. 303; Co- 
requisite M.E. 432. 



230 The Agricultural and Technical College 

429. Materials Testing Laboratory. Credit 2(0-4) 

A fundamental laboratory course including standard test procedures for 
tension, compression, shear, torsion, hardness, and impact. Studies on iron, 
steel, other alloys, wood, brick, sand, gravel, cement, and concrete. Pre- 
requisite: M.E. 312. 

431, 432, 433. Mechanical Engineering Laboratory II, III, IV. 

Credit 1(0-3) each 
Advanced study and tests in the areas of power plants, heating and air 
conditioning, metallurgy, fluid flow, compressed air, fuels and combustion, 
lubricants, steam engines, turbines and internal combustion engines. Pre- 
requisite: M.E. 320; Co-requisites: M.E. 411, 428, 412. 

441, 442, 443. Mechanical Engineering Seminar I, II, III. Credit 1(0-2) each 
Reports and discussions on special topics in mechanical engineering and 
related fields. Prerequisite: Senior standing in mechanical engineering. 

450. Engineering Practice. Credit 3(3-0) 

Communication, law, human relations and professional development in the 
practice of engineering. Development and use of communication tools, pro- 
fessional understanding and contract documents. Prerequisite: Eng. 102. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

Donald A. Edwards, Chairman 



The purposes of the courses offered by the Department of Physics are: 

1. To train students desiring to meet the urgent need for physicists in 
industrial or civil service research laboratories, and to provide them 
with courses required for graduate study. 

2. To train teachers of physics for the secondary schools. 

3. To provide the fundamental and advanced courses required by majors 
in other areas. 

4. To provide non-science students with experiences which will give a 
greater appreciation of the present and future importance of physics 
in an age of machines and atomic energy. 

The major in Engineering Physics will supplement the minimum of courses 
outlined below by selecting electives from other courses in the School of 
Engineering, as directed by the Department of Physics. The requirement of 
20 hours of German may be reduced by High School entrance credit in 
German. 

Students desiring to teach physics will seek a major in Physics, and they 
should consult with this department before registration for the Freshman 
year; they should begin the study of physics with Physics 201 in the 
Sophomore Year. 

The non-science major should elect Physics 111, 112. 



School of Engineering 



231 



Suggested Program for Physics Major 
Freshman Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Chemistry 101, 102, 103 5 

Mathematics 111, 112, 113 5 

English 101, 102, 103 5 

Social Science 101, 102, 103 3 

ROTC or Physical Education* 1 



19 



Sophomore Year 



Course and No. Fall 

Physics 201, 202, 203 5 

Mathematics 221, 222, 223 5 

English 105, 210 3 

Botany 101, Education 201 — 

Humanities 201, Psychology 203 3 

ROTC or Physical Education* 2 



18 



Junior Year 



Course and No. Fall 

Guidance 501 3 

Mathematics 231 — 

Physics 320, 340, 380 3 

Physics 370, 360 — 

Education 202, Psychology 301, 302 3 

Physical Education 1 

Engineering Electives or ROTC 5 

Health Education 234 3 



Winter 
5 
5 
5 
3 
1 

19 



Winter 

5 
5 
3 
5 



20 



Winter 

5 
3 
3 

3 
1 
3 



Spring 
5 
5 
5 
3 
1 

19 



Spring 
5 
5 



3 
3 
2 

18 



Spring 



18 



18 



17 



Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Physics 387 5 

Physics 401, 402 3 

Zoology 101, 102 5 

Education 301, 312 3 

Education 311 — 

Engineering Electives or ROTC 3 



Freshman Year 



19 



Course and No. Fall 

Chemistry 101, 102, 103 5 

Mathematics 111, 112, 113 5 

English 101, 102, 103 5 

Social Science 101, 102, 103 3 

Electives* 1 



Winter 



Spring 



3 


— 


5 


— 


5 


— 


— - 


10 


6 


3 


19 


13 


inter 


Spring 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


3 


3 


1 


1 



19 



19 



19 



* Freshman and sophomore male student* who are not veterans are required to enroll 
in air science or military science each quarter of their freshman and sophomore years. 



232 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



Suggested Program for Engineering Physics Major 
Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Mathematics 221, 222, 223 5 5 5 

Physics 201, 202, 203 5 5 5 

German 101, 102, 103 5 5 5 

Humanities 210, 220, 230 or English 105 ... 3 3 3 

Electives* 2 2 2 

20 20 20 



Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Mathematics 506, 520, 231 5 

Physics. 320, 340, 380 3 

Physics 370, 360 — 

German 205 3 

Economics 310, 312 5 

Engineering Electives or ROTC 3 

19 



Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Physics 420, 421 5 

Physics 387, 480 5 

Physics 440, 441 — 

Physics 401, 402, 403 3 

Engineering Electives or ROTC 6 

19 



Winter 


Spring 


5 


5 


3 


5 


3 


5 


5 





3 


3 


19 


18 


Winter 


Spring 


5 


— 


— 


5 


5 


5 


3 


3 


6 


6 



19 



19 



COURSES IN PHYSICS 

Undergraduate 

111, 112. Principles of Physics I, II. Credit 5(4-2) each 

A two-quarter terminal course, including mechanics, properties of matter, 
heat, electricity and magnetism, wave motion, sound, light, and selected 
topics in Modern Physics. Prerequisite: Math. Ill, or concurrent election. 

201, 202, 203. General Physics, I, II, III. Credit 5(3-4) each 

A study of the fundamental principles of mechanics, properties of matter, 
heat and thermometry, magnetism, direct and alternating current electricity, 
wave motion, sound, light, and atomic physics. For science and technical 
majors. Prerequisite: Math. 113. 

320. Mechanics. Credit 3(3-0) 

.An intermediate cour?e with special emphasis upon rotation, harmonic 
motion, gravitation, hydrodynamics, and viscosity. Prerequisites: Phys. 
2oz and Math. 222. 



* Freshman and sophomore male students who are not veterans are required to enroll 
in air science or military science each quarter of their freshman and sophomore years. 



School of Engineering 233 

An intermediate course including electric fields and potential, D.C. cir- 
cuits, chemical and thermal emf's dielectrics, meters, magnetic properties 
of matter, alternating current, electromagnetic waves, and electronics. Pre- 
requisites: Physics 203, Math. 223. 

350. Vibration and Sound. Credit 5(5-0) 

Production, propagation, transmission and reception of sound. Applica- 
tions to acoustics, mechanics, and electrical problems. Prerequisites: Physics 
203, Math. 231. 

370. Light. Credit 3(3-0) 

Propagation, reflection, refraction of light, lenses and optical instruments, 
interference, diffraction, polarization, line spectra, thermal radiation, pho- 
tometry, and color. Prerequisites: Physics 203, Math. 223. 

360. Heat and Thermodynamics. Credit 5(5-0) 

Includes equations of state, laws of thermodynamics, entropy, fluid flow, 
heat transfer, single and two-phase mixtures, and statistical mechanics. 
Prerequisite: Physics 203, Math. 223. 

380. Introduction to Modern Physics. Credit 5(5-0) 

An introductory course involving electromagnetic theory of radiation, 
kinetic theory of gases, specific heats, the electron, electronics, X-rays, spec- 
tra, radioactivity, nuclear physics, and cosmic rays. Prerequisites: Physics 
203, Math. 223. 

385. X-Ray Diffraction Analysis. Credit 5(3-4) 

An introductory course with emphasis upon the powder method, including 
X-ray sources, crystal shapes, and determinations of unit cell parameters 
and atomic positions. Prerequisite: Physics 380 or special permission. 

387. Solid State Physics. Credit 5(5-0) 

Structure and imperfections in crystals and metals, energy levels of 
metals, semi-conductors and their applications, insulators. Prerequisite: 
Physics 203 and preferably Physics 380. 

401, 402, 403. Advanced Laboratory I, II, III. Credit 3(0-6) each 

A senior level course involving intensive study and careful performance 
of selected experiments in the various fields of physics. Prerequisites: Junior 
level courses in physics. 

420, 421. Physical Mechanics I, II. Credit 5(5-0) each 

Includes motion of a particle, damped harmonic oscillator, central field 
motion, rotating coordinate systems, Fourier series in vibrating strings, 
Lagrange's equations. Vector analysis used. Prerequisites: Physics 320 and 
Math. 520. 

440, 441. Electromagnetism I, II. Credit 5(5-0) each 

Includes AC and DC circuit theory, Gauss' Law, Poisson and Laplace 

equations, dielectric and magnetic materials, Maxwell's equations. Pre- 
requisites: Physics 340 and Math. 520. 

480. Particles of Modern Physics. Credit 5(5-0) 

An advanced study of cathode rays, positive rays, photons, X-rays, 
positrons, neutrons, and cosmic rays. Prerequisite: Physics 380. 



234 The Agricultural and Technical College 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

501, 502. General Physics for Science Teachers I, II. Credit 3(2-2) each 
For persons engaged in the teaching of science. Includes two hours of 
lecture-demonstration and one two-hour laboratory period per week. Both 
courses may be combined during a single quarter for double credit. For 
science teachers only. 

540. Electricity for Science Teachers. Credit 3(3-0) 

Includes electric fields, potentials, direct current circuits, chemical and 
thermal emf's, electric meters, and alternating currents. For Science 
teachers only. Prerequisites: Physics 501, 502 or equivalent. 

580, 581. Modern Physics for Science Teachers I, II. Credit 3(3-0) each 
An introductory course covering the usual areas of modern physics. Both 
courses may be combined during a single quarter for double credit. For 
science teachers only. Prerequisite: General Physics. 



SCHOOL OF NURSING * 




School of Nursing 237 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Naomi W. Wynn, Dean 



The program is designed to prepare the student for nursing based on 
sound principles of general education as well as nursing education with 
integration of these aspects planned for in the curriculum. A nursing pro- 
gram within the College organization provides not only for the acquiring 
of scientific knowledge and technical skills, but also for development in 
social responsibilities and general cultural attributes. 

The program is planned to prepare the student for assuming expanding 
responsibilities in nursing, in inter-professional teams, and in community 
living. To achieve this goal, experiences will be provided to assist the 
student in developing technical skills, ability in communications and co- 
operative group endeavors, and in understanding physical, psychological, 
and social aspects of health and disease and their application in the solution 
of health problems. 

It is believed that the education of the nurse should be based on scientific 
principles. 

It is believed that emphasis in nursing education should be placed on the 
development of the student as a person, a worker, and as a citizen. 

It is believed that the curriculum should be planned and carried out to 
provide learning experiences for the student in all major areas so that she 
will be able to function effectively in first level positions. 

It is believed that the educational institution granting the degree in 
nursing should be responsible for maintaining qualified faculty and have 
control of the educational program. 

It is believed that nursing is a progressive science which must make 
changes to meet the health needs of our society and that it is our respon- 
sibility to help the student to make adjustments to new situations. 

Finally, it is believed that good nursing care includes the prevention of 
disease, meeting the total needs of the patient and educating the patient 
and his family to care for him after discharge. 

OBJECTIVES OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

1. To assist the student in developing the knowledge and skils essential 
to function effectively in first level positions in hospitals, public 
health agencies, other health institutions, and in the home. 

2. To assist the student in developing an understanding of and ability to 
impart to others, the importance of health conservation and prevention 
of disease. 

3. To assist the student in understanding self in order that she might 
develop a wholesome attitude in maintaining maximum personal re- 
lationship. 



238 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



4. To assist the student in understanding the functions of a team leader 
in planning to meet the needs of each patient as an individual. 

5. To stimulate the student to acquire the ability to recognize the con- 
tinuous changing process in nursing and the importance of future 
study in order to function effectively in the area in which she shows 
aptitude and interest. 

6. To encourage continuous development of character and personality of 
each individual according to his needs and to provide opportunities 
for participation in local, state and national organizations. 

7. To assist the student in developing an appreciation for the nursing 
profession and an understanding of present problems and opportuni- 
ties in nursing. 

PROMOTION AND GRADUATION 

In order to remain in good standing after the freshman year, a student 
must maintain a cumulative quality point average of 2.0 or better in all 
nursing courses. 

To be eligible for graduation, a student must present a "C" average for 
the whole curriculum. 

Suggested Program for Nursing 
Freshman Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Chemistry 105, 106, 107 5 5 5 

English 101, 102, 103 5 5 5 

Zoology 101 5 — — 

Anatomy 131 — 5 — 

Physiology 141 — — 5 

Nursing 101, 102, 103 1 3 4 

Physical Education 1 — — 

17 18 19 

Sophomore Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring Summer 

Bacteriology 201 5 — — — 

English 210, 320 3 — 5 — 

Nursing 201, 202, 203, 204 8 8 8 8 

Nutrition 123, 129 5 5 — — 

Sociology 231 — 5 — — 

Psychology 201 — — 5 — 

Sociology 331 — — 3 — 

21 18 21 8 

Junior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring Summer 

Nursing 310, 320, 330 10 10 10 — 

Child Development 133 5 — — — 

Psychology 203, 304 — 3 5 — 

Nursing 340, 350 — — 4 12-16 

Elective 3 5 — — 

18 18 19 12-16 



School of Nursing 239 

Senior Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Nursing 440, 420, 430 9 9 9 

Health Education 234 — — 3 

Nursing 450 — 4 — 

Sociology 434 3 — — 

12 13 12 

COURSES IN NURSING 

Undergraduate 

N101. Introduction to Nursing. Credit 1(0-2) 

N102. Credit 3(3-0); N103. Credit 4(3-2) 
The series of courses "Introduction to Nursing" is intended to introduce 
the student to: (1) the historical and modern development of nursing, (2) 
the profession and its role, (3) the student's role in beginning to recognize 
and meet patient's needs. This is a three quarter course for freshman stu- 
dents in a school of nursing offering a baccalaureate degree. Methods of 
teaching will include those best suited to assist in obtaining the objectives 
of each area of the course. 

N201, N202, N203, N204. Medical-Surgical Nursing. Credit 8(6-24) each 
This is a sequence of courses designed to enable the student to develop 
understandings and skills necessary in meeting the needs of selected 
patients with medical-surgical conditions. This includes planned lecture, 
laboratory and/or clinical experience. Emphasis is placed on the funda- 
mentals of nursing care; its rationale and nursing measures involved. 

N310. Medical-Surgical Nursing. Credit 10(6-16). 

A continuation of medical-surgical series with emphasis on conditions 
requiring surgical intervention and nursing care of selected patients. 

N320. Obstetric Nursing. Credit 10(6-16) 

This course is basically designed to help the student acquire knowledge, 
attitudes and skills needed to give safe and effective nursing care to mothers 
and babies. It deals essentially with pregnancy, labor, delivery, and the 
puerperium with emphasis on the spiritual, psychological, social, as well as 
physical needs, of each mother and baby. It includes supervised practice in 
the clinical areas. 

N330. Pediatric Nursing. Credit 10(6-16) 

Study of the child in health and disease from the preventive and curative 

aspects, including the communicable disease of childhood. Twelve weeks of 

instruction and supervised practice in pediatric nursing in the clinical area. 

N340. Public Health Nursing. Credit 4(4-0) 

A basic course in public health developed to orient the student to prin- 
ciples of public health administration, environmental sanitation, epidemiol- 
ogy, and biostatistics. 

N350. Psychiatric Nursing. Credit 16(8-4-24*) 

A study of the dynamics of human behavior with emphasis on pathological 
manifestations and rehabilitative measures in classroom and clinical area 
for a twelve week period. 

* Indicates clinical or laboratory experiences off-campus in addition to such campus ex- 
periences. 



240 The Agricultural and Technical College 

N420. Medical-Surgical Nursing. Credit 9(3-24) 

This is a continuation of the medical-surgical series with emphasis on 
comprehensive care of patients with medical conditions. Twelve weeks of 
clinical instruction is included. 

N430. Medical-Surgical Nursing. Credit 9(3-24) 

This is a continuation of the medical-surgical series with emphasis on 
comprehensive care of patients with surgical conditions. Twelve weeks of 
clinical instruction is included. 

N440. Principles and Practice of Public Health Nursing. Credit 9(3-24) 
This is a basic course providing opportunity for the student to increase 
her understanding of the nature and principles of public health nursing 
and public health administration through the application of these prin- 
ciples in an organized local health department. Units of instruction are 
based on knowledge, attitudes and skills that are required in the practice 
of public health nursing. The role of the public health nurse in relationship 
to the total public health program will be explored through orientation, 
demonstration and supervision of the student in an official local health 
department. 

N450. Trends and Comprehensive Nursing. Credit 4(4-0) 

This course is designed to include principles and problems related to the 
transition of student to practitioner. Emphasis will be placed on current 
trends, problem solving and managerial skills. 

Credit for the instruction and supervised practice in the clinical areas are 
computed on the basis of one college credit for four hours of supervised 
practice. 



' THllGRADUATE 







I 



'^'. 



y 








The Graduate School 243 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

George C. Royal, Jr., Dean 



Graduate education at The Agricultural and Technical College of North 
Carolina was authorized by the North Carolina State Legislature in 1939. 
The authorization provided for graduate training in agriculture, applied 
sciences and allied areas of study. An extension of the graduate program, 
approved by the General Assembly of North Carolina in 1957, provided for 
enlargement of the program to include teacher education, as well as such 
other programs of a professional or occupational nature as might be 
approved by the State Board of Higher Education. 

Purpose 

The Graduate School coordinates advanced course offerings of all depart- 
ments within the academic schools of the College in which graduate courses 
are taught. 

For the academically mature student The Graduate School offers a type of 
instruction consistent with the demands of contemporary society. Graduate 
study is particularly recommended for those students whose aptitudes and 
interests carry them beyond routine application. Students are expected to 
develop their powers of independent thought and to become familiar with 
the discipline of research. The Graduate School seeks: (1) to provide the 
requisite environment for its students by frequent and critical re-evaluation 
of the curricula; and, (2) to observe strict adherence to standards set 
forth by the faculties of the College as well as those of the appropriate 
accreditation agencies. 

Degrees Granted 

The Graduate School of The Agricultural and Technical College of North 
Carolina offers one degree, the Master of Science. This degree may be 
earned in the following fields: 

1. Agricultural Education 

2. Chemistry 

3. Education 

a. Administration and Supervision 

b. Elementary School Program 

c. Secondary School Program — (The student may select one of the 
following areas for certification purposes.) 

(1) Biology 

(2) Chemistry 

(3) English 

(4) French 



244 The Agricultural and Technical College 

(5) General Science 

(6) History 

(7) Mathematics 

(8) Social Science 

4. Industrial Arts Education 

Master of Science Programs in Agricultural Education, Education, and 
Industrial Education may enable students to become eligible for the follow- 
ing certificates issued by the North Carolina State Board of Instruction: 

1. Graduate Elementary Certificate 

2. Graduate Secondary Certificate 

3. Principal's Certificate 

Admission to Graduate Study 

Applicants for graduate study must hold a bachelor's degree from an 
educational institution of recognized standing. They should obtain applica- 
tion blanks from The Graduate School or from the Office of Admissions. 
With the application, two transcripts of all previous undergraduate and 
graduate work must be filed. To assure early processing, applications to- 
gether with all supporting documents must be received by the College at 
least 10 days prior to a registration period. 

Undergraduate Preparation. The undergraduate work of an applicant must 
be above average in quality, especially in the area in which he wishes to 
concentrate. In general, undergraduate grades below "B" average in the 
primary field of concentration are taken as evidence of unfitness for 
graduate work. They usually predict early academic difficulties if the 
student is permitted to enroll in graduate-level courses. Admission to study 
toward a degree will be denied, if the applicant failed to earn a minimum 
overall grade-point average of 2.6 on the 4.0 system or 1.6 on the 3.0 system 
in obtaining the undergraduate degree. 

Provisional Admission. An applicant may be admitted to The Graduate 
School on a provisional basis if (1) his baccalaureate degree was earned 
from a non-accredited institution, or (2) his undergraduate preparation 
reveals course deficiencies that can be removed near the beginning of his 
graduate study. 

Special Students. Admission to The Graduate School may be granted to 
applicants who wish to pursue a non-degree program by taking courses for 
self-improvement, renewal of Class A Primary, Grammar Grade, or High 
School Teacher Certificates. Such applicants must possess the baccalaureate 



The Graduate School 245 

degree and meet the standards required for admission to a degree pro- 
gram. The utilization of credits earned as a special student, may only be 
applied to credit for a degree at the option of The Graduate School. 

The Bulletin of The Graduate School 

General requirements for the Master's degree, course descriptions, ad- 
mission to degree candidacy, and other pertinent information about graduate 
study may be found in The Bulletin of The Graduate School. 






THE TECHNICAL INSTl 




Department of Automotive Technology 

Department of Building Construction Technology 

Department of Drafting Technology 

Department of Electrical Technology 

Department of Mechanical Technology 



The Technical Institute 249 

THE TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 

S. C. Smith, Dean 



The Technical Institute meets the growing demand for the technically 
trained personnel in the expanding industries of North Carolina and through- 
out the country. 

The institute was organized to offer technological training and a back- 
ground in general studies to provide both the skills and intellectual develop- 
ment for the productive and intelligent citizen. 

Curricula 

The Technical Institute offers four two-year programs and one three-year 
program. An Associate Degree in Science is awarded for satisfactorily com- 
pleting either of the courses. 

Two-Year Programs 

Automotive Technology 
Drafting Technology 
Electrical Technology 
Mechanical Technology 

Three-Year Program 

Building Construction Technology 

Building Construction curriculum is designed to prepare persons to work 
as foremen, superintendents, or contractors in the construction industry. 
This course is especially designed for those who have acquired basic skills 
in building trades before entering college. 

The curricula are designed to meet the needs of the following types of 
students-: 

1. Those who for financial or other reasons cannot afford to spend four 
years in training. 

2. Those who desire proficiency in a specific area of technology. 

3. Employed persons who need additional technical training in their 
chosen fields. 

Admission 

General admission requirements are the same as those listed for admis- 
sion to the College, including at least one unit each of high school algebra, 
geometry and science. A student with sixteen high school units may be 



250 The Agricultural and Technical College 

admitted without the required units in mathematics, but will be expected to 
correct such deficiencies by taking additional courses, without credit after 
enrolling. 

Graduation Requirement 

Students are required to satisfactorily complete the prescribed course of 
study they pursue with a minimum grade point average of 2.00. 

Military training must be taken as required by the College. 

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY 

Marquis L. Cousins, Chairman 

The purpose of the automotive program is to develop technicians who 
have the ability to diagnose the technical difficulties in the operation of 
automotive equipment. Special emphasis is placed upon technical informa- 
tion and knowledge of basic scientific principles. 

The training includes information on basic management and business 
operations. This course should meet the needs of persons having good tech- 
nical, mechanical, and executive abilities who wish to qualify as technical 
specialists or who desire to prepare themselves for supervisory positions. 

The Automotive Technology program consists of two options: 

1. Auto Mechanics 

2. Auto Body and Metal 

The first three quarters of the curriculum are the same for the two 
options. 

CURRICULUM 

First Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

English 101, 102 5 5 — 

Mathematics 111, 112, 113 5 5 5 

Fundamentals of Electricity and 

Magnetism, E.T. 120 3 — — 

Theory of Internal Combustion 

Engines, A.T. 121 3 — — 

Fuels and Carburetion, A.T. 122 — 3 — 

Internal Combustion Engine Operation 

and Testing, A.T. 123 — 3 — 

Fundamentals of Metal Joining, M.T. 115 . . — — 3 
Automotive Electric Systems and 

Accessories, A.T. 124 — — 5 

Accounting 201, 202 3 3 — 

Business Administration 102 — — 5 

19 19 18 



The Technical Institute 



251 



OPTION I — AUTO MECHANICS 

CURRICULUM 

Second Year 

Course and No. Fall 
Advanced Electrical Diagnosis and 

Engine Tune-Up, A.T. 225 3 

Fundamentals of Hydraulics, A.T. 226 2 

Physics 201, 202 5 

Internal Combustion Engine, A.T. 227 — 

Automatic Transmissions and Power 

Train, A.T. 228, 229 5 

Front End Geom. and Brake System, A.T. 230 — 

Transportation Problems, A.T. 231 — 

Fundamentals of Metal Joining 

Processes, M.T. 116 3 

Machine Tool Lab., M.T. Ill, 112 — 

Shop Planning and Operational Procedures, 

A.T. 232 — 

Elective — 



Winter 



Spring 



18 



16 



16 



OPTION II— AUTO BODY SCHEDULE 

Second Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Auto Body Design Construction, A.T. 240 . . 3 — — 

Physics 201, 202 5 5 — 

Fundamentals of Metal Joining 

Processes, M.T. 115, 116 3 — 3 

Machine Tool Lab, M.T. Ill, 112 3 3 — 

Fundamentals of Painting, A.T. 241 3 — — 

Auto Body Rebuilding & Repair, A.T. 242 . — 5 — 
Front End Geometry and Brake System, 

A.T. 230 — 3 — 

Transportation Problems, A.T. 231 — — 2 

Shop Planning and Operational Processes, 

A.T. 232 — — 5 

Auto Body Painting & Finishing, A.T. 243 . . — — 5 

Elective — — 3 



17 



16 



18 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

121. Theory of Internal Combustion Engine. Credit 3(2-2) 

Theory of operation of internal combustion engine with practical labora- 
tory work with disassembly, assembly, and study of fundamental operations 
with basic elements of repair. 



122. Fuels and Carburetion. 

Theory and types of common fuels used and how 
engines. Principle of fuel pumps and carburetion. 



they 



Credit 3(3-0) 
affect internal 



123. Internal Combustion Engine Operation and Testing. Credit 3(1-4) 
A lecture demonstration course including methods of using testing equip- 
ment, motor analyzers, types of tests and equipment. 



252 The Agricultural and Technical College 

124. Automotive Electric System and Accessories. Credit 5(3-4) 

Theory, inspection and maintenance of ignition systems. Theory of opera- 
tion of batteries, cranking motors, charging systems and lighting. 

225. Advance Electrical Diagnosis of Engine Tune-Up. Credit 3(2-4) 
Theory and use of modern electrical testing equipment. Diagnosis, trouble- 
shooting, testing, and techniques of repairing electrical units. 

226. Fundamentals of Hydraulics. Credit 2(2-2) 
A study of basic mechanics as applied to automatic transmissions, power 

steering, power brakes, etc. 

227. Internal Combustion Engine Mechanics. Credit 3(2-2) 
Major overhaul, engine rebuilding, use of boring bar, cylinder honing, etc. 

228. Automatic Transmissions and Power Train. Credit 5(2-6) 
Theory, operation and inspection of clutches, transmissions, differentials 

and drive lines. Theory, operation of automatic transmissions, torque con- 
verters, fluid couplings and overdrives. 

229. Automatic Transmissions and Power Train. Credit 5(2-6) 
Disassembly and assembly of automatic transmission and power train 

units. 

230. Front End Geometry and Brake Systems. Credit 3(1-4) 
Operation and maintenance technique of suspension systems, steering 

gears, wheel alignment and brakes system. 

231. Transportation Problems. Credit 2(2-0) 
Problems in selecting equipment, servicing fleet and commercial vehicles. 

232. Shop Planning and Operational Procedures. Credit 5(3-4) 
This course is designed to give the student both theoretical and practical 

experience in service management and operating a garage as a place of 
business, shop methods, record keeping. 

240. Auto Body Design and Construction. Credit 3(3-0) 
The theory of body construction, shapes, parts of panels. How they are 

constructed, methods of replacing, repairing damaged panels, etc. 

241. Fundamentals of Painting. Credit 3(2-3) 
The safety procedures, proper care of equipment, paint materials, color 

matching, the methods of preparation of surface for finishing, masking, 
sanding, priming, types of paints. 

242. Auto Body Rebuilding and Repairing. Credit 5(3-4) 
Disassembly and assembly of damaged panels, repairing fender, doors, 

quarters panels, tops, the techniques of welding and soldering. Practical 
fender repairing including bumping, dinging, filing, sheet metal, heat 
shrinking, solder filling, plastic filling, use of disc sanders and aligning 
and roughing panels. 

243. Auto Body Painting and Finishing. Credit 5(3-4) 
The procedure of spray lacquer, synthetic enamel and acrylic paints, spot- 
ting, color blending, proper under the ground coats. Garnish molding in- 
terior, estimation. 



The Technical Institute 



253 



BUILDING CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY 

James F. Dawkins, Chairman 

The curriculum in Building Construction will meet the needs of students 
who wish to acquire, in a minimum length of time, the principles of building 
construction and related work. Training is given in planning, estimating, 
and construction work; also, the necessary related technical information 
concerning materials and processes of related trades is provided. 

This training includes information on basic management and business 
operation, so that the students will be capable of serving as construction 
supervisors and contractors, after they have had a reasonable amount of 
experience. 

CURRICULUM 
First Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Mathematics 111, 112, 113 5 5 5 

English 101, 102 5 5 — 

Engineering Graphics, M.E. 101, 102 3 3 — 

Construction Methods, B.C. Ill, 112, 113 . . 5 5 5 

Materials of Construction, I.Ed. 224 — — 3 

Blueprint Reading, B.C. 115 — — 3 

Plane Surveying, M.E. 220 — — 3 

18 18 19 

Second Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Industrial Psychology, Psy. 403 — 5 — 

Electric Wiring, B.C. 225 — 3 — 

Technical Drafting, T.D. 231, 232, 233 ... 4 4 4 

Machine Woodworking, B.C. 221, 222 ...... — 5 5 

Engineering Practices, M.E. 450 — — 3 

Mechanical Equip, for Bldgs., B.C. 227 3 — — 

Accounting 201 — — 3 

Business Administration, B.A. 102 5 — — 

Human Relations, B.C. 211 5 — — 

17 17 15 

Third Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Physics 201, 202 5 5 — 

*Concrete & Masonry Construction, 

B.C. 331, 332, 333 5 5 5 

Estimating, B.C. 335, 336 3 3 — 

*Bldg. Materials Lab., B.C. 337, 338, 339 5 3 5 

Wood & Steel Construction, B.C. 341 — 3 — 

Heating & Air Conditioning, M.E. 315 — — 3 

Problems of Construction, B.C. 340 — — 3 

Foremanship Fundamentals, B.C. 342 — — 3 

18 19 19 

* Optional Courses — Two of the following courses may be substituted for 
two of the above courses as approved by the advisor: B.C. 344, 345; 346, 
347; or 348, 349. 



254 The Agricultural and Technical College 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

111. Construction Methods. Credit 5(3-6) 
Full size models of various framing sections of dwelling houses are con- 
structed and studied, with special attention being given to building codes 
and zoning laws. The National Building Code is used in conjunction with 
textbooks covering the construction of residence foundations and framing 
systems. Floor joists, rafters, floors, wall and roof construction are included. 

112. Construction Methods. Credit 5(3-6) 
Practical training in residential building construction is continued with 

consideration given to the various finishes and completion processes includ- 
ing cornice work, and siding. The proper application of millwork, insulation 
and hardware are studied. 

113. Construction Methods. Credit 5(3-6) 
Practical bench work training is given in making joints, followed by 

cabinet work requiring the use of both bench and machine operation. In- 
struction is also given in the use of steel square and in roof framing. Stu- 
dents lay out the different kinds of roof rafters using full-sized material. 

115. Blueprint Reading. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of architectural blueprints for all students who must translate 
drawings into actual existing structures. This course is also useful for stu- 
dents in general layout of electrical, plumbing and heating and air con- 
ditioning systems. 

211. Human Relations. Credit 5(5-0) 

A study of problems in the work-a-day world which will aid one in getting 
along with people on the job, in the community and the home. These units 
of work include: habits one may acquire in order to improve human rela- 
tions, privileges, rights and obligations as a citizen; obtaining and holding 
a job; labor problems, social and commercial insurance and the use of 
leisure time. 

221. Machine Woodworking. Credit 5(3-6) 
Deals with the use of woodworking tools and the operation and main- 
tenance of woodworking machines. The selection and uses of various kinds 
of cabinet construction by hand tools and machine operations. Actual shop 
practice in making various types of cabinets such as kitchen cabinets, built- 
in wardrobes, and bookcases. 

222. Machine Woodworking. Credit 5(3-6) 
Machine woodwork, including advanced operations on the power saws, 

jointer, planer, mortiser and shaper; advanced construction; manufacturing 
methods, materials, detailing of cabinets, and quantity survey. Prerequisite: 
221 B.C. 

225. Electric Wiring. Credit 3(2-3) 

The study of materials, methods, and nomenclature used in residential 
and commercial wiring, including a study of national and local codes, layout, 
plans, and specifications. 

227. Mechanical Equipment for Buildings. Credit 3(2-3) 

The basic principles and advanced practices in the selection, installation, 
operation and maintenance of equipment in the general areas of water 
supply and sanitation. 



The Technical Institute 255 

331. Concrete and Masonry Construction. Credit 5(3-6) 
An introduction to the kinds and uses of brick, mortar, concrete, and 

masonry tools and equipment. Construction of walls, piers, chimneys, esti- 
mating', etc. 

332. Concrete and Masonry Construction. Credit 5(3-6) 
This course covers laying out work as designed by working drawing, the 

erection of building structures of brick, block, and structural tile. The care 
and operation of mechanical equipment. 

333. Concrete and Masonry Construction. Credit 5(3-6) 
The study and application of various types of masonry construction and 

construction methods employing various masonry materials. Emphasis on 
brick veneering, concrete foundations, floors, etc. 

335. Estimating. Credit 3(3-0) 
This course is designed to enable the student to develop a fundamental 

knowledge of estimating construction cost of the various materials utilized 
in the building construction field. 

336. Estimating. Credit 3(3-0) 
A study of various types of estimates in determining the cost of ma- 
terials, equipment, labor and other items which are pertinent to an accurate 
system of estimating. 

337. Building Materials Lab. Credit 5(3-6) 
Methods of general interior and exterior house painting. Students become 

familiar with all the tools, equipment, and materials used in the trade. He 
receives actual practice as well as the technical information necessary to 
acquire a thorough working knowledge of the painting and decorating 
trades. 

338. Building Materials Lab. Credit 3(1-6) 
Theory and practice of and with the materials, tools, and equipment 

used in painting and decorating. Training is given in preparing surfaces, 
mixing and applying all types of house paints. The composition, characteris- 
tics and properties of paints and the surfaces suitable for their application 
are given careful consideration. 

339. Building Materials Lab. Credit 5(3-6) 
The course is designed to give the student a general and practical knowl- 
edge of the decorative, fabricated, synthetic materials and other products 
used in the building trades. Work in the laboratory will include experimental 
exercises and actual working with these materials. 

340. Problems of Construction. Credit 3(3-0) 
A study and analysis of various problems in the construction industry. 

Consultants and experienced personnel in the building construction field are 
frequently called upon as guest lecturers. 

341. Wood and Steel Construction. Credit 3(2-3) 
A study of the design of beams, girders, joist, and columns in both wood 

and steel. Included is the study of various timber fasteners, steel and timber 
trusses, and steel frame works. 



256 The Agricultural and Technical College 

342. Foremanship Fundamentals. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of industrial accident prevention, considering the nature and 
extent of the accident problem. A practical study is given the technique for 
control of industrial hazards together with the fundamentals of good or- 
ganization. 

344, 345. Building Methods. Credit 5(3-6) Each 

The use of builder's level, staking out building sites, foundations, ad- 
vanced frame construction; including complex layout of roofs of all types. 
Advanced blueprint reading, layout and estimating of buildings. Actual 
practice in building residence and commercial type buildings of light frame 
construction. Prerequisite: B.C. 113. 

346, 347. Concrete and Masonry Construction. Credit 5(3-6) Each 

Emphasis is placed on residential and industrial building. An integral 
study of such phases of building construction as brickmasonry, plastering, 
concrete work, structural and ceramic tile. An investigation of current 
production methods, codes, ordinances. Lectures are supplemented by lab- 
oratory studies, research projects, and consultants from industry. 

348, 349. Painting and Finishing. Credit 5(3-6) each 

Advanced theory on finishing materials; their properties, manufacture 
and use. Practice in using various types of materials on interior and ex- 
terior work in laboratory. 

351. Metal Work. Credit 3(2-3) 
A comprehensive coverage of the basic principles and procedures in build- 
ing construction metal work. The two general classes of metal work covered 
will be outside metal jobbing and heating and ventilation. 

352. Masonry Construction. Credit 2(0-6) 
A study of the history of masonry among the ancient and modern nations 

of the world. Practical work in the construction of masonry projects. 

353. Masonry. Credit 2(0-6) 
A general study of the uses of brick, concrete, plaster, tile and stone in 

the construction industry. 

354. Use of Power Tools in Cabinet Making. Credit 2(0-6) 
Care and use of power tools. Built-in cabinets, small projects such as 

desks, bookcases or useful projects for the home. 

355. Finishing in Cabinet Making. Credit 2(0-6) 

Inside trim. Varieties and characteristics of timber used in projects. 
Applying hardware, application of stain, varnish, shellac and enamel. 

356. Color Dynamics. Credit 2(0-6) 
A course designed to give a technical knowledge of colors and their uses. 

Mixing and matching colors, color psychology, color schemes and color 
harmony will be included in the course. 

357. Decorating for Homemakers. Credit 2(0-6) 
A course designed to give the student a knowledge of general painting 

done around the home. A study will be made of the types of materials and 
paints used as well as coating small areas and articles found around the 
home. 



The Technical Institute 



257 



DRAFTING TECHNOLOGY 

J. L. Jenkins, Chairman 

The Drafting Technology curriculum is designed for students with good 
aptitudes in drafting subjects, and for those who wish to secure positions 
as draftsmen and other related positions in the technical fields. 

The broad scope of subject matter prepares the student to seek employ- 
ment or advance to positions as inspectors, sales engineers, estimators, 
engineering assistants, designers, technical report writers, installation tech- 
nicians, and production foremen. 

Special attention is given to insure necessary skills on the part of the 
student in all fields of modern drafting. Moreover, the drafting department 
has special courses geared to the special problems and needs of building 
construction majors. 



CURRICULUM 

First Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Engineering Graphics, M.E. 101, 102, 103 . . 3 

Accounting 201 — 

Business Administration 102 — 

Technical Drawing, T.D. 113 — 

Mathematics 111, 112, 113 5 

English 101, 102 5 

M.T. Ill 3 

Manufacturing Processes, M.E. 321 — 

16 



Winter 
3 



18 



Spring 
3 
3 

4 
5 



3 
18 



Second Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Technical Drawing, T.D. 221, 222, 223 4 

Wood and Steel Construction, B.C. 341 — 

Technical Drawing, T.D. 224 — 

Human Relations, B.C. 211 5 

Physics 201, 202 5 

Machine Tool Lab, M.T. 112 — 

Estimating, B.C. 335 — 

Problems of Construction, B.C. 248 — 

Introduction to Engineering Computations, 

M. E. 200 — 

Plane Surveying, M.E. 220 — 

Fund. Elec. & Mgtsm., E.T. 101 3 

Elective — 



17 



Winter 
4 



3 
17 



Spring 
4 
3 
3 



19 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

113. Technical Drawing. Credit 4(1-6) 

Scales used in detailing, voiding of details, general notes, types of con- 
struction, use of manufactured materials and equipment, use of engineering 
calculations and construction operations. Prerequisite: M.E. 102. 



258 The Agricultural and Technical College 

221. Technical Drawing. Credit 4(1-6) 
Working drawings of connectors, fabrication materials, fasteners, foot- 
ings, maps, plot plans, and floor plans for industrial and residential buildings. 

222. Technical Drawing. Credit 4(1-6) 
Working drawings dealing with structure details, blueprint reading, trac- 
ing, and methods of reproduction. The student at this point must be able 
to classify papers, drawing media of all types and their uses, and to con- 
struct graphs and make graphical solutions to drafting problems. 

223. Technical Drawing. Credit 4(1-6) 
Working drawings chosen of different degrees of difficulty. Each student 

will be required to do detail working drawings in machinery, electrical, 
residential and industrial structures. 

224. Drafting Room Methods. Credit 3(3-0) 
Lectures from visiting lecturers in the field of drafting, visitation to 

drafting departments in industry and in the surrounding community, and 
a study of drafting room procedures. A brochure must be developed by each 
student. 

231. Plans. Credit 4(1-6) 
Layout methods and procedure, for window and door conventions, stan- 
dard symbols for wiring, plumbing, heating, abbreviations, and systems of 
dimensioning used in making plans for residential and industrial buildings. 
Prerequisite: M.E. 102. 

232. Elevations and Sections. Credit 4(1-6) 
Layout procedure of making elevations and sections drawings. Prerequi- 
site: T.D. 231. 

233. Reproduction and Display. Credit 4(1-6) 
_ Reproduction drawings as well as the means of reproduction. Includes 

display drawings, perspective drawing, free hand sketching, water color 
and pencil rendering. 

ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Melvin T. Alexander, Chairman 

The purpose of the Electrical Technology program is three-fold: first, to 
train a person to become a skilled technician; second, to provide good basic 
skills in related fields that will enable him to properly communicate with 
others in his chosen field. Third, inspire him to improve himself in order 
to become a better citizen as well as a better technician. 

The curriculum is designed to provide in the first year basic courses that 
will give a good foundation in mathematics, English, and other courses that 
will provide discipline in the development of concise scientific thinking and 
at the same time enable them to grasp new ideas and conceive better ways 
of putting these ideas into practice. 

The second year has three options: 

OPTION I— RADIO-TELEVISION SERVICING 

This course is designed to prepare one to meet the needs of the radio- 
television service industry which has become one of the largest of the serv- 



The Technical Institute 



259 



ice fields. The course will meet the need of those who wish to establish their 
own business or seek emplo3 r ment as service-men. 

OPTION II — INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS 

The second option has courses designed for those who plan to go into 
industry or government work as electronic technicians. Emphasis is placed 
on specialized electronic circuits encountered in the industry. The person is 
trained to work with the engineer in solving the many problems that are 
faced in this space age. 

OPTION III— INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICITY 

The third option is designed to train the student to fill the need for the 
great demands of the world-wide boom in building and construction of 
homes, and commercial buildings. Courses are designed to conform with the 
National Electrical Code are stressed and design and methods follow closely 
with those used in industry in order to enable one to prepare the student 
for employment in the industrial electricity industry. 



CURRICULUM 

First Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter 

Mathematics, 111, 112, 113 5 5 

English 101, 102, 103 5 5 

Engineering Graphics, M.E. 101, 102 3 3 

Fund, of Elec. & Mag., E.T. 120 3 — 

Electronic Circuits, E.T. 121 — 3 

Accounting 201 — — 

Radio & Elec. Circuits, E.T. 122 — — 

Instruments & Measurements, E.T. 123 . . ... — — 

16 16 



Spring 
5 
5 



19 



OPTION I— RADIO-TELEVISION SERVICING 

CURRICULUM 

Second Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter 

Physics 201, 202 5 5 

Basic Television, E.T. 204 5 — 

Accounting 202 3 — 

T.V. Lab, E.T. 205, 206 — 5 

Human Relations, B.C. 211 " — 5 

Construction Technique, E.T. 207 5 — 

Audio, E.T. 208 ' — — 

Special Problems, E.T. 209 — — 

Shop Technique, E.T. 230 — — 

Elective — 3 

18 18 



Spring 



16 



260 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



OPTION II — INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS 
Second Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter 

Physics 201, 202 5 5 

Accounting 202 3 — 

Amplifiers, E.T. 231 5 — 

Communications, E.T. 233 — 5 

Industrial Psychology, Ed. 403 — 5 

Electronic Control, E.T. 234 — 5 

Electronic Systems, E.T. 235 — — 

Semi-Conductors, E.T. 236 — — 

Electronic Circuits, E.T. 237 — — 

Advanced Electronic Instruments, E.T. 232 . 3 — 

16 20 



Spring 



15 



OPTION III — INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICITY 
Second Year 

Course and No. Fall Winter Spring 

Physics 201, 202 5 5 — 

Wiring Methods, E.T. 238 5 — — 

Illumination, E.T. 239 3 — — 

Human Relations, B.C. 211 5 — — 

Estimating, B.C. 335 — 3 — 

Wiring Design, E.T. 242 — 5 — 

Low Voltage Wiring, E.T. 243 — 5 — 

Motor Control E.T. 244 — — 5 

Electric Motor Winding, E.T. 245 — — 5 

Special Problems, N.E. Code, E.T. 246 — — 5 

18 18 15 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

101. Basic Electricity. Credit 3(2-2) 

A general background in basic electricity theory, such as Ohm's law, 
A.C., D.C., magnetism, batteries and other basic information. 

120. Fundamentals of Electricity and Magnetism. Credit 3(2-3) 
This course deals with A.C. and D.C. circuits, Ohm's law, and power 

relationship. 

121. Electronic Circuits I. Credit 3(2-3) 

A solid foundation is built in circuits required in electronics. Emphasis 
is placed on circuit analysis using problem-solving techniques. This course 
includes Ohm's law, power and efficiency, conductors, Kirchoff's law, in- 
ductance, and capacitance. 

122. Radio and Electric Circuits. Credit 3(3-2) 
This course is a more advanced study of electronic circuits and makes a 

further study of more advanced circuits than those studied in E.T. 121. 

123. Instruments and Measurements. Credit 3(3-0) 
This course offers the student the opportunity to become familiar with a 

variety of electronic measuring instruments such as the volt-meter, V. T. 
V. M., signal generator, tube checker, oscilloscope, watt meter, ohmmeter, 
and other instruments used in electronics for measurement. 



The Technical Institute 261 

204. Basic Television. Credit 5(3-4) 
This course is a study of basic television circuits including both the re- 
ceiver and transmitter. The complete television receiver is studied using 
all types of special television test equipment and the tech-master demon- 
strator for classroom demonstration. 

205. Television Laboratory. Credit 5(2-6) 
The problems in the installation and servicing of television receivers in 

the home, test pattern analysis, checking and adjusting the receiver and 
the use of trouble-shooting charts and basic test equipment are taught. 

206. Television Laboratory. Credit 5(2-6) 
Special problems encountered in the installation of receiving antennas 

and advanced methods of trouble-shooting receivers are covered during this 
quarter. 

207. Construction Technique. Credit 5(3-4) 
This laboratory course provides a background in techniques used in con- 
struction. This includes point to point wiring and square corner wiring, all 
types of soldering, component color coding, screw types and sizes and the 
correct use of hand tools. Chassis are laid out and constructed. 

208. Audio. Credit 5(5-0) 
The study of a band of frequencies in the audio range and the associated 

equipment needed to reproduce these frequencies. Special audio amplifiers, 
generators, speakers and audio circuits are covered in this course. 

209. Special Problems. Credit 3(3-0) 
This course gives the student both theoretical and practical solutions to 

many special problems encountered in Radio-Television Service. 

230. Shop Technique. Credit 3(0-6) 
Correct shop practices are applied to manufacturing techniques, testing 

and servicing procedure, building laboratory test equipment, apparatus 
lavout and construction. 

231. Amplifiers. Credit 5(5-0) 
A special study of all types of A.F. voltage amplifiers and power ampli- 
fiers. Frequency response, amplitude and phase distortion, feed back with 
special emphasis placed on high fidelity amplified design and construction. 

232. Advanced Electronic Instruments. Credit 3(2-2) 
Many instruments used in industrial electronics must be of special design 

and of extreme accuracy. The student is afforded an opportunity to become 
familiar with this class of instruments. 

233. Communications. Credit 5(3-4) 
Electronic circuits used in communication are covered in this course. This 

includes telephone, telegraph, and mobile radio. Special emphasis is placed 
on the citizen band and the correct installation and maintenance of equip- 
ment used for two-way radio communication. 

234. Electronic Control. Credit 5(5-0) 
Basic courses are combined to form systems. The laboratory work consists 

of experimental investigations using typical equipment and methods. 

235. Electronic Control Systems. Credit 5(3-4) 
A continuation of E.T. 234. 



262 The Agricultural and Technical College 

236. Semi-Conductors. Credit 5(5-0) 
A study of transistors, diodes, and other devices used in electronic cir- 
cuits that are in the semi-conductor class. 

237. Industrial Electronics. Credit 5(5-0) 
Computers, solid state devices, and theory of operation of many of the 

new advances in the electronic world is covered in this course. 

238. Wiring Methods. Credit 5(3-60 
A study of wiring 1 and wiring methods used in buildings. The proper selec- 
tion of wire sizes, fuses, circuit breakers, distribution systems, control cir- 
cuits and service entrances. 

239. Illumination. Credit 3(2-2) 
Principles and practices of illumination are stressed. Modern illumination 

principles, calculation procedures, and equipment are coordinated in design 
problems of complete fluorescent and incandescent lighting installations. 

242. Wiring Design and N.E. Code. Credit 5(3-4) 
This course is a study of design and layout of electrical wiring systems 

for lighting, motors, and control circuits in accordance with standard prac- 
tice and the recommendations of the National Electric Code. 

243. Low Voltage Multi-Control System. Credit 5(3-6) 
Low voltage wiring methods, selection of controls, and relays. This system 

uses small relays which are actuated by low voltage switches to control 
lighting and other circuits in residential commercial installations. 

244. Motor Controls. Credit 5(3-4) 
The application, operation, characteristics of controls used with electrical 

motors. 

245. Electrical Motors and Winding. Credit 5(2-6) 

Principles of single phase, split phase, and poly-phase motors are studied. 
Proper use of the coil winding machine, oven, and correct methods of test- 
ing motors. 

246. Special Programs. Credit 4(4-0) 

Presentation by students of oral and written reports in development and 
standards in wiring according to the current changes in the National Elec- 
tric Code. 

147. Introduction to Photography. Credit 3(2-2) 
Small camera operation and roll film development, operation and tech- 
niques used in making good pictures with small cameras, types of film used 
in small cameras and their development. 

148. Contact and Projection Printing. Credit 3(2-2) 
A continuation of E.T. 147 with training in contact, projection printing, 

and various finishing methods. 

149. Composition in Photography. Credit 3(2-2) 
Planning of subject material for composition in the picture, using natural 

and artificial light in photography, and means of correcting common errors. 

250. Portrait Photography and Negative Retouching. Credit 3(2-2) 

Basic portrait lighting, artificial and natural. Basic posing of individuals 
and groups. Improving picture quality by negative retouching. 



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263 



251. Sensitometry. Credit 3(2-2) 
A study is made of photo cells, electric eye and their use in photography. 

Papers and materials used for saloon mounting and television viewing. 

252. Color Photography. Credit 3(2-2) 
An intensive course in advantages and disadvantages of color, principles 

of color, types of color film, film development, color harmony and clothing, 
subject color, subject contrast, and latest improvements in color. 



MECHANICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Andrew W. Williams, Chairman 

The course is planned for those persons who wish to become skilled tech- 
nicians, tool and die specialists, production foremen in machine shops and 
metal working industries of all types and technical assistants to engineers. 
A person planning to enter this course should have a good mechanical 
aptitude and ability. Basic procedures in manufacturing processes of the 
metal working industries are covered as well as the directly related courses 
explaining the "why" of many procedures in the manufacturing process. 
Selected courses are included in the curriculum in order to help the graduate 
advance in the industrial world. 

The Department of Mechanical Technology includes Air Conditioning 
and Refrigeration Technology as an option. Students who wish to major 
in this area should register for the courses listed in the Air Conditioning 
and Refrigeration Technology curriculum. 



CURRICULUM 
First Year 

Course and No. Fall 

M.T. 121, 122, 123 5 

Chemistry 101, 102 5 

Engineering Graphics, M.E. 101, 102 3 

Mathematics 111, 112, 113 5 

E.T. 120 — 

M.T. 115 — 

English 101 — 

18 



Winter 
5 
5 
3 
5 



18 



Spring 
3 



19 



Second Year 

Course and No. Fall 

Mechanical Technology 225, 226, 227 5 

Mechanical Engineering 200, 205 2 

Mechanical Engineering 450 3 

English 102 5 

Mechanical Engineering 103 3 

Psychology 403 — 

Physics 201, 202 — 

Accounting 201 — 

Business Administration 102 — 

18 



Winter 
5 
3 



Spring 
5 



18 



18 



264 The Agricultural and Technical College 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

111. Machine Tool Lab. for Non-Mechanical 

Technology Majors. Credit 3(2-2) 

A basic course in machine tool lab consisting of bench work, drill press 
work, and basic engine lathe operations. 

112. Machine Tool Lab. for Non-Mechanical 

Technology Majors. Credit 3(2-2) 

Basic and advanced operations on the lathe, shaper, miling machine, 
grinder and turret lathe. 

113. Machine Tool Lab. for Non-Mechanical 

Technology Majors. Credit 3(2-2) 

Advanced operations on all major machines. Prerequisite: M.T. 112. 

115. Fundamentals of Metal Joining. Credit 3(2-2) 
The course is designed to give the student the knowledge and understand- 
ing of the fundamentals of welding, brazing and soldering. 

116. Fundamentals of Metal Joining Processes. Credit 3(2-2) 
This course is designed to give the student the understanding of the fun- 
damentals of the different processes of metal joining, which include electric 
arc welding, heliarc welding, spot welding, oxyacetylene gas welding, braz- 
ing, and soldering. 

117. Advanced Fundamentals of Metal Joining Process. Credit 3(2-2) 
This is a continuation of M.T. 116 designed to give practical experience 

in the operation of tools required in the process of welding and in brazing 
and soldering. 

121. Machine Tool Lab. I. Credit 5(3-4) 
Basic processes in machine shop practice. Emphasis will be on the drill 

press, lathe and layout methods and the use of hand tools and measuring 
instruments. 

122. Machine Tool Lab. II. Credit 5(3-4) 
Continuation of machine shop basic operations with emphasis on the 

milling machine, shaper, grinders, precision layouts and fittings. Prerequi- 
site: M.T. 121. 

123. Elementary Metallurgy. Credit 3(2-2) 
Elementary study of the basic structures of metals and their composition. 

Case hardening, annealing, drawing, quenching, melting points of various 
metals, temperatures for hardening, etc. Prerequisite: M.T. 122. 

225. Tool Design. Credit 5(3-4) 
The design and manufacture of tools, jigs, fixtures for production work. 

Prerequisite: M.T. 123. 

226. Tool Making and Testing. Credit 5(3-4) 
Techniques in the building of jigs, fixtures, special cutting tools, press 

dies and other special tools used in production work, and test of properties 
of materials. Prerequisite: M.T. 225. 



The Technical Institute 



265 



227. Manufacturing Processes. Credit 5(3-4) 

Planning and running a machine shop. The problems connected with the 
setting up and running of a machine shop will be discussed. Techniques in 
buying equipment and supplies; also, selecting competent workers, estimat- 
ing production time will be discussed. Prerequisite: B.A. 102. 

AIR CONDITIONING AND REFRIGERATION TECHNOLOGY 

The purpose of this course is to prepare the students to meet the re- 
quirements of the various branches of the air conditioning and refrigeration 
industry. Students who complete the requirements of this course will be 
qualified for employment as technicians, operating engineers, servicemen, 
and also for work in other areas of the air conditioning and refrigeration 
industry. If desired, students may establish businesses for themselves. 
Training consists of technical information, laboratory experiments, and 
practical projects in refrigeration. 



CURRICULUM 
First Year 

Course and No. Fall 

A.R. 121, 123, 125 3 

A.R. 122, 124, 126 2 

Mathematics 111, 112, 113 5 

English 101, 102 5 

M.T. 115 — 

M.T. Ill, 112 3 

E.T. 120 — 

19 

Second Year 

Course and No. Fall 

A.R. 227, 228, 229 5 

Physics 201, 202 5 

Business Administration 102 — 

Mechanical Engineering 101, 102 3 

Accounting 201, 202 3 

Building Construction 211 — 

Elective 3 

19 



Winter 


Spring 


3 


3 


2 


2 


5 


5 


5 


— 


— 


3 


3 


— 


— 


3 


18 


16 


Winter 


Spring 


5 


5 


5 


— 


— 


5 


3 


— 


3 


— 


— 


5 


2 


3 


18 


18 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

121. Basic Refrigeration. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the basic principles of refrigeration and electricity. Typical 
application of refrigeration cycles and the value of refrigeration tables. 



122. Refrigeration Equipment Laboratory. 

Application of the principles learned in A.R. 121. 



Credit 2(0-6) 



123. Commercial Refrigeration. Credit 3(3-0) 

Purpose and construction of refrigeration units and refrigerants — regula- 
tions and codes. Commercial refrigeration load calculation — sizing and 
selection of pipes, valves, fittings, and controls. 



266 The Agricultural and Technical College 

124. Commercial Refrigeration Laboratory. Credit 2(0-6) 
Practical problems dealing with the construction of refrigeration units. 

Continuation of A.R. 123. 

125. Special Systems and Refrigeration Trouble Analysis. Credit 3(3-0) 
A study of all the components of refrigeration systems and their troubles. 

Multiple and cascade systems, calculations and refrigeration piping, the 
refrigerant charge, water piping, and water chillers. 

126. Refrigeration Systems Laboratory. 

Actual hook-ups of special systems outlined in A.R. 125. 

227. Principles of Air Conditioning. Credit 5(3-6) 
A study of the various fundamentals involved in the conditioning of air 

for comfort. Sensible and latent heat, heat transfer, states of matter and 
humidity. 

228. Air Conditioning Systems and Controls. Credit 5(3-6) 
A continuation of A.R. 227 with more emphasis upon the control of air, 

temperature, moisture, and humidity. Control, psychometric properties of 
air and air conditioning systems, self contained and remote. 

229. Heat Loads. Credit 5(3-6) 
Types of heat loads, heat transmission and other types of systems not 

covered in A.R. 229 such as heat pumps, and automobile air conditioning. 

DRIVER EDUCATION 

Isaac Barnett, Instructor 

314. Driver Education and Traffic Safety. Credit 3(2-3) 

This course is designed to train students who may wish to teach driver 
education in the public schools. Emphasis will be placed on the objective 
and scope of driver education, traffic laws, preventive maintenance, skill 
developing exercises and aids to teaching. 

403. Driver Education and Teacher Training. Credit 3(2-3) 

This course provides the student with the necessary preparation to orga- 
nize and administer the high school driver education program. Special 
attention will be given to methods and resources; scheduling and evaluation. 
Laboratory experience will be provided on the dual control automobile. 



RE 



CfiBS* TRAINING CORPS 




Department of Military Science 
Department of Air Science 



Reserve Officers Training Corps 269 

DEPARTMENTS OF AIR AND MILITARY SCIENCE 

The Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) at A & T College consists 
of those students enrolled for training in the Department of Military Science 
or in the Department of Air Science. These Departments are integral 
academic and administrative subdivisions of the institution. The Senior 
Army Officer and the senior Air Force Officer assigned to the college are 
designated as Professor of Military Science (PMS) and Professor of Air 
Science (PAS), respectively. These senior officers are responsible to the 
Department of Defense and the institutional Coordinator of Military Train- 
ing for conducting the training and academic program. Army officers who 
are assigned to the College as instructors in the ROTC are designated 
Assistant Professors of Military Science; Air Force officers, as Assistant 
Professors of Air Science. Noncommissioned officers of the Army are 
assigned as assistant instructors and administrative personnel. Noncom- 
missioned officers of the Air Force are assigned as Specialists, Technicians, 
and Supervisors in the area of Administration, Education, Personnel, and 
Supply. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Programs of instruction for both the Army and Air Force ROTC consist 
of a two-year basic course and a two-year advanced course. The basic 
course in either the Army or the Air Force ROTC is required for all phy- 
sically fit male freshmen and sophomores not less than 14 years of age 
who have not been excused from the course by the College administration. 
Enrollment in advanced courses is contingent on the passing of an advanced 
course qualifying test and selection by the Professor of Military Science 
or Professor of Air Science. However, any student who is selected for 
enrollment enrolls in the advanced course for the purpose of obtaining a 
commission as a Reserve Officer in either the Army or Air Force. He must 
be a citizen of the United States and possess the character and loyalty re- 
quirements prescribed by the Armed Forces. In addition, he must have 
demonstrated the qualities and positive potential for becoming an effective 
officer. A student will not be enrolled in the advanced Air Force ROTC 
course if his age is such that he will be unable to complete all of his ROTC 
training and his academic requirements for a degree from this institution 
prior to reaching 26% years of age, if he is subsequently programmed for 
flying training, or 28 years of age, if he is programmed for other than 
flying training. Enrollment in Advanced Army ROTC will be limited to 
those students who can qualify for appointment as second lieutenants prior 
to reaching 28 years of age. 

A veteran who has served at least six months of active duty service 
with any branch of the Armed Forces may be excused from the freshman 
portion of the basic ROTC course. A veteran with one year or more of 
active service in the Armed Forces may be excused from the entire basic 
ROTC course and, upon reaching his junior year, may be permitted to enroll 
in advanced courses of the Army or the Air Force, at the discretion of the 
Professor of Military Science and the Professor of Air Science respectively, 
provided he meets the requirements mentioned in the preceding paragraph. 



270 The Agricultural and Technical College 

UNIFORMS AND EQUIPMENT 

All regularly enrolled members of the Air Force and Army ROTC units 
are furnished by the Government free of cost, uniforms, equipment, and 
textbooks. A deposit of ten dollars ($10.00) is required of all students at 
time of registration to cover uniforms issued to them. This fee will be 
refunded when uniforms are returned. The student is responsible for the 
care, safe-guarding, and cleaning of property issued to him. He is finan- 
cially responsible for the loss, excessive wear, breakage due to carelessness, 
or unauthorized use of clothing and equipment. 

All ROTC property must be returned to the Military Property Custodian 
at the end of the school year or when a student withdraws from school. 

CREDIT 

Credit is allowed for work at other institutions having an ROTC Unit 
established in accordance with the provisions of the National Defense Act 
and regulations governing the ROTC. Record of a student's prior training 
in the ROTC is obtained from the institution concerned. 

FINANCIAL AID 

Students enrolled in the advanced course are paid a monetary allowance 
in lieu of subsistence at the daily rate equal to the value of the commuted 
ration $(0.90) for a total period not to exceed 595 days during the two 
years of the course. Students in the basic course receive no monetary 
allowance. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE ROTC 

The Air and Army ROTC units are organized into a Joint Cadet Corps. 
The Corps consists of the Army ROTC Cadet Battalion, the Air Force 
ROTC Cadet Group, the Army and Air Force Drill Teams, Bands, and 
Military and Air Police Units. The Corps is commanded by a Cadet Colonel 
selected from among Army and Air Force Cadets on alternate years. The 
Corps staff consists of two cadet officers from each unit. The units combine 
to perform as a corps in several special occasions during the academic 
year. 

DISTINGUISHED CADETS 

The Professor of Air Science and Professor of Military Science with the 
concurrence of the College are authorized to designate outstanding cadets 
as Distinguished AFROTC Cadets and Distinguished Military Students 
respectively. These cadets may upon graduation be designated Distinguished 
Graduates. They may subsequently be awarded commissions in the regular 
components of the Army or Air Force provided they desire to apply and 
are selected. 

SELECTIVE SERVICE IN RELATION TO THE ROTC 

Enrollment in the ROTC does not in itself defer a student from induction 
and service under the Universal Military Training and Service Act. The 
law provides that "within such numbers as may be prescribed by the Secre- 
tary of Defense, any person, who (a) has been or may hereafter be selected 



Reserve Officers Training Corps 271 

for enrollment or continuance in the senior division, Reserve Officers' Train- 
ing Corps, or in the Air Force Reserve Officers' Training Corps, or the Naval 
Reserve Officers' Training Corps; (b) agrees, in writing, to accept a com- 
mission, if tendered, and to serve, subject to order of the Secretary of the 
Military Department having jurisdiction over him, not less than two years 
of active duty after receipt of a commission in the Army or four years if 
commissioned in the Air Force; and (c) agrees to remain a member of a 
regular or reserve component until the eighth anniversary of the receipt 
of a commission in accordance with his obligations under subsection (d) 
of Section 4 of this title, shall be deferred from induction under this title 
until after completion or termination of the course of instruction and so 
long as he continues in a regular or reserve status upon being commissioned, 
but shall not be exempt from registration." 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE 

Lt. Colonel William Goode, PMS 



The program of instruction, as offered by the Department of Military 
Science, has as its objectives the production of junior officers who have the 
qualities and attributes essential to their progressive and continued devel- 
opment as officers of the Army of the United States; the laying of a foun- 
dation for intelligent citizenship within the student; the imparting to the 
student of a basic military knowledge of benefit to himself and to the 
military in the event he becomes a member thereof, and the furtherance of 
the program of the College. 

COURSES IN MILITARY SCIENCE 

The Basic Course 

101. Military Science I. Credit 1(1-2) 

A history of the organization of the Army and ROTC, with a study of the 
reasons for their continued growth. Purposes and objectives of military 
training, its benefits and potentialities. Organization of Infantry units with 
emphasis on specific duties and responsibilities of key personnel. Introduc- 
tion to the evolution of firearms with particular attention to detailed con- 
struction, mechanical functioning, and proper application of markmanship 
techniques. Development of initiative and self-confidence through leadership 
training and drill experience. 

*102. Military Science I. Credit 1(1-2) 

A continuation of instruction in mechanical functioning of military small 
arms and the proper application of marksmanship techniques. Discussions 
of the missions and responsibilities of the United States Army in National 
Security with emphasis on the geopolitical aspects of contemporary world 
history. Further development of initiative and self-confidence through 
leadership training and drill experience. 

*An elective academic subject approved by the PMS is required at some 
period during the freshman year of all MSI cadets. 



272 The Agricultural and Technical College 

103. Military Science I. Credit 1(1-2) 

Discussions on National Security are continued. Discussions will include 
the Role of the Army in all Conceivable Types of War, Manpower and 
Training Problems and the student's personal responsibility as a citizen 
and leader. Leadership training with a view toward the cultivation of de- 
sirable traits of leadership and self confidence. 

201. Military Science II. Credit 2(2-2) 

A comprehensive survey of the origin and growth of the United States 
Army. A teaching of the principles of war with illustrations of their appli- 
cation to modern warfare. A general study of the foreign and United States 
military policies and the basic causes leading to the various wars in which 
the United States has participated. Emphasizing of the continuing progress 
of the United States Army with stress on factors leading to organizational, 
tactical, logistical, operational, strategic and social patterns found in the 
present-day Army. American History with primary emphasis on its mili- 
tary aspects. 

202. Military Science II. Credit 2(2-2) 
A continuing study of American Military History emphasizing the attri- 
butes of American military leaders and their contributions to the advance- 
ment of the Art of War. The growing influence of logistics as brought about 
by the complexities of modern warfare. The basic principles of map 
mechanics to include military grid reference systems, map projections, and 
determination of scale, distance and direction. Includes an analysis of 
aerial photographs. Leadership laboratory. 

203. Military Science II. Credit 2(2-2) 
A continued study of map reading techniques with emphasis on map co- 
ordinates, determination of elevation, percentage of slope, visibility and 
terrain analysis. Introduction to basic tactics and operations. Leadership 
laboratory. 

The Advanced Course 

301. Military Science III.** Credit 3(3-2) 

Instruction in the personal and professional qualifications required of 
an effective military instructor. Emphasis on practical application 
through use of supervised presentations by each student of a military 
lesson. Methods and procedures for effecting good military instruction are 
stressed. Leadership principles designed to give each student a broad aspect 
of the leadership requirements of the newly commissioned officer. Stress is 
on leadership with emphasis on a functional approach to the study of leader- 
ship. Leadership, drill and command with stress on the development of self- 
confidence and the exercise of command. 

302. Military Science III. Credit 3(3-2) 
Roles of the various combat arms and technical services of the U. S. 

Army illustrating how these Army branches are welded together into the 
formidable "Army Team." An introduction to signal communications at 
small unit level. Review of the Principles of Offensive and Defensive 
Combat and their application to units of the Infantry Division Battalion. 
Practice in the application of sound principles of military leadership. 



**An elective academic subject approved by the PMS is required at some period during 
the junior or senior year of all MS III and IV cadets. 



Reserve Officers Training Corps 273 

**303. Military Science III. Credit 3(3-2) 

A continuation of small unit tactics and communication. A study of com- 
munication principles and procedures in the Infantry Division Battalion. 
Orientation on the nature and purpose of ROTC summer camp training to 
include sociological factors involved. Leadership laboratory designed to 
point out responsibilities and qualities of a leader and human behavior. 

401. Military Science IV. Credit 3(3-2) 
Staff Organization and Duties. Estimate of the Situation and Combat 

Orders. Principles of Combat Intelligence to include the collection of infor- 
mation of the enemy, weather and terrain; and the analysis and subsequent 
proper dissemination of military intelligence. Training management in- 
cluding the scheduling of systematic procedures and efficient organization 
for training. 

Fundamentals of Supply and Movement of Small Units. Leadership, drill 
and command with emphasis on the essential attributes of leadership ability 
in all fields of human endeavor. 

402. Military Science IV. Credit 3(3-2) 
Army administration emphasizing personnel management and counselling. 

Principles and procedures of Military Law to include the types of military 
courts and a comparison of military and civilian systems of justice. Leader- 
ship with emphasis on the essential attributes of leadership in all fields 
of human endeavor. 

403. Military Science IV. Credit 3(3-2) 
An analytical treatment of the geographical and economic aspects of 

National Security in the United States. A study of the War Potential of the 
United States, and selected foreign countries, as conditioned by certain 
natural and human factors. An orientation on the customs of the service 
and other aspects of Army life applicable to the newly commissioned officer. 
Leadership laboratory with emphasis on methods of maintaining discipline 
and morale. 



DEPARTMENT OF AIR SCIENCE 

Major Willis J. Hubert, PAS 



The Air Force Reserce Officers Training Corps at the Agricultural and 
Technical College aims to develop in selected college students, through a 
permanent program of instruction, those qualities of leadership and other 
attributes essential to their progressive advancement to positions of in- 
creasing responsibility as commissioned officers in the United States Air 
Force. 

The purpose and specific objectives of this program are: 

a. To develop in selected cadets, through a sound education and training 
program, the initial motivation to serve as career officers in the 
United States Air Force. 



** An elective academic subject approved by •'he PMS is required at some period during 
the junior and senior year of all MS III and IV cadets. 



274 The Agricultural and Technical College 

b. To develop in cadets by precept, example, and participation the attri- 
butes of character, personality, and attitudes essential for leadership. 

c. To develop in cadets an interest in the Air Force, and an understand- 
ing of its mission, organization, operations, problems, and techniques. 

d. To provide that military education and training which will prepare 
cadets to discharge the duties and responsibilities required of them 
as Air Force officers. 

e. To select and motivate cadets for career fields as specifically required 
by the United States Air Force. 

COURSES IN AIR SCIENCE 

The Basic Course 
AIR SCIENCE 1 

A.S. 101. Foundations of Aerospace Power. 

An appropriate college course and its credits will be substituted in lieu 
of Air Science academics. 

Two hours of Leadership Laboratory Training are required per week. 

A.S. 102. Foundations of Aerospace Power. 

An appropriate college course and its credits will be substituted in lieu 
of Air Science academics. 

Two hours of Leadership Laboratory Training are required per week. 

A.S. 103. Foundations of Aerospace Power. Credit 2(2-2) 

A survey of the constituent elements of aerospace power, the organization 
and operation of the military arm of the Federal government, and an eval- 
uation of the professional officer in the United States Air Force. 

AIR SCIENCE 2 

A.S. 201. Fundamentals of Aerospace Weapon Systems. Credit 2(2-2) 

An introduction to aerospace missiles and aircraft and their propulsion 
systems; aerospace defense; modern targeting and electronic warfare; high 
explosive, nuclear, chemical, and biological warheads; and aerospace stra- 
tegic and tactical organizations and operations with contemporary Air 
Force weapon systems. 

A.S. 202. Fundamentals of Aerospace Weapon Systems. Credit 2(2-2) 

An introduction to problems, mechanics, and military implications of 
present and future space operations, and contemporary aerospace military 
thought. 

A.S. 203. Fundamentals of Aerospace Weapon Systems. 

An appropriate college course and its credits will be substituted in lieu 
of Air Science academics. 

Two hours of Leadership Laboratory Training are required per week. 



Reserve Officers Training Corps 275 

The Advanced Course 
*AIR SCIENCE 3 

A.S. 301. Air Force Officer Development. Credit 3(4-2) 

Knowledge and skills required of a junior staff officer in the Air Force. 
This includes staff organization and functions, communicating, and in- 
structing. 

A.S. 302. Air Force Officer Development. Credit 3(4-2) 

Problem solving techniques are taught as applied to Air Force Staff 

and Command problems. In addition the Military Justice System is taught. 

A.S. 303. Air Force Officer Development. Credit 3(4-2) 

Problems in leadership and management. Application of the principles 
and theories of problem solving and leadership to simulated and real Air 
Force problems are treated. 

**AIR SCIENCE 4 

A.S. 401. Cadet Corps Staff Activities. Credit 3(4-2) 

Knowledge and skills required to organize, direct, coordinate, supervise, 
and evaluate all elements of cadet corps activity. Ten contact hours are 
devoted to an introduction presenting the Weather and Navigational aspects 
of airmanship. 

A.S. 402. Military Aspects of World Political Geography. Credit 3(4-2) 
The concepts of the military aspects of political geography; maps and 
charts; factors of power; and the geographic influences upon political prob- 
lems with a geopolitical analysis of the strategic areas. 

A.S. 403. International Relations; and the Air Force Officer. Credit 3(4-2) 
Three quarter hours are devoted to the study of the major factors under- 
lying international tensions — nationalism, imperialism, and communism; 
the attempts to alleviate these tensions — balance of power concepts, the 
Lsague of Nations, the United Nations and the regional security organiza- 
tions; and the rise of the two super-powers — the United States and the 
USSR. Ten contact hours are devoted to the study of material to help the 
cadet make a rapid effective adjustment to active duty as an officer in the 
United States Air Force. 

***A.S. 404. Flight Training. Credit 3(3-3) 

Academic Instruction devoted to civil air regulations, and Metorology to 
include a recognition of weather, fog, icing and cloud formation and other 
procedures such as Aerial Navigation and radio, radio voice procedures, 
Flight Service and Flight Safety are also treated. 

***A.S. 405. Flight Training. Credit 3(3-3) 

Flight Instruction provided with sufficient scope to qualify the cadet in 
the basic principles of contact flying in aircraft of 65-200 horsepower in- 
cludes air discipline, flight inspection, basic flight maneuvers, emergency 
procedures, precision landings, take-offs, and cross country flights. 

* Cadets usually attend Summer Training Unit after completing Air Science 3 and be- 
fore taking Air Science 4. 

** Air Science 4 Cadets may be required to substitute Geography 420 and Government 
422 for Air Science 402 and 403 respectively. 

*** Must be approved by the Dean of the Department in which student is registered. 
Students enrolled in A.S. 404 and 405 may, at their option, accept or decline credit offered. 







,^_ 



Prizes and Awards 279 

PRIZES AND AWARDS 

Five Alumni Scholarships of $1,000 each awarded by the A. and T. College 
Alumni Association to the five high school seniors who scored highest on 
the College Entrance Psychological Test. Recipients for September 1961. 

Russell Hewett Williston Senior High, Wilmington, N. C. 

Rumsey H. Helms G. W. Carver High, Fieldale, Virginia 

Orson T. Kirk Hillside High, Durham, N. C. 

Reginald Mitchiner Hillside High, Durham, N. C. 

Andrew D. McBride William Penn High, High Point, N. C. 

The James G. K. McClure Educational and Development Fund, Inc. 
Scholarships of $200 each awarded to two needy, deserving first year stu- 
dents from the mountain counties of North Carolina who show intellectual 
ability and Christian character. 

Johnny Long Ervin Thomas Edward Conley 

The Alice B. Campbell Scholarship of $200 given by the A. & T. College 
Ladies Faculty Club to a needy girl with excellent character and good 
scholastic rating. 

Buena Pauline Moore 

The Susie B. Dudley Scholarship of $100 presented by the L. J. Spaulding 
Real Estate Business, Greensboro, N. C, in honor of the late Mrs. Susie B. 
Dudley. This goes to a selected student in the Graduate School. 

The Ralph Johns Athletic Scholarship Award of $100 given by Mr. Ralph 
Johns of Greensboro, N. C, to foster the development of good sportsman- 
ship, leadership and manliness. 

John H. Edwards, III 

The Hamilton Gold Watch Award presented by the Hamilton Watch Com- 
pany to the graduate in Engineering who has most successfully combined 
proficiency in his major field of study with notable achievements in the 
social sciences and humanities. 

Paul E. Parker 

The Brotherhood Award of $50 given by Mr. Ralph Johns of Greensboro, 
N. C. to the student who during the year has done most to promote brother- 
hood, goodwill and inter-racial understanding. 

Albert Rozier 

The Zeta Alpha Chapter, Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Incorporated, Scholar- 
ship Award of $25. 



280 The Agricultural and Technical College 

e stella v. coley 

The Saslow's Incorporated Medal Award to the Graduating Senior with 
the best record in the School of Education and General Studies. 

James Franklin Blue 

The Saslow's Incorporated Medal Award to the graduating senior with 
the best record in the Social Science. 

Glenwood Cooper 

The Merrick Medal Award to the graduating senior for all-around excel- 
lence in Industrial Arts. 

Benny Franklin Mock 

The William Andrew Rhodes Medal Award to the person who attained 
the best record in Musical Studies and Activities during the year. 

Henry Hunt 

The Spaulding Medal Award to that member of the graduating class with 
the highest achievement in Agriculture, presented by Mrs. L. J. Spaulding 
of Greensboro, N. C. 

Basil G. Coley 

The Philadelphia Chapter, Alumni Association Trophy Award to the 
Most Outstanding Athlete of the year. 

Lorenzo Stanford 

The Gate City Chapter, Alumni Association Award to that member of the 
graduating class who has rendered the Most Distinctive Service to the col- 
lege and to the community. 

Maxine Zachary 

The William H. Foushee Memorial Scholarship Cup Award presented by 
Dr. J. M. McGhee of Greensboro, N. C. to the member of the Junior Class 
with the highest scholastic average. 

Arthur SoLOMor: Mangaroo 

The Willetta S. Jones Award presented by Miss R. Winifred Heyward to 
the graduating senior in the School of Nursing who exemplifies the highest 
ideals of Christian living and finer womanhood. 

Johnny Bell Bunch 

The L. Richardson Memorial Hospital Woman's Auxiliary Award to the 
graduating senior in the School of Nursing for all-around excellence in 
nursing. 



Prizes and Awards 



281 



Clara Leach 

The Band Awards for Four Years of Meritorius Service in the College 
Band. 



Matthew Barnhill 
Earnest Coles 
Deloris Gibbs 



Henry Hunt 
Purcell Knight 

Ernest McCoy 



John Page 
Marvin Sexton 
Edgar Thomas 
William Witherspoon 



Recipients of Awards for Four Years of Meritorious Service in the 
A. & T. College Choir. 



Larry Bell 



Richard Smith 



William Whitaker 



Recipients of Awards for Three Years of Meritorious Service in the 
A. & T. College Choir. 



Bobby Griffin 



Clarence A. Richardson McHarrell Thomas 



National Scholastic Press Association Awards for high journalistic 
achievement on The Register, the college newspaper. 
The Star — for leadership ability. 

Cleveland M. Black 

The Star — for outstanding reporting. 

Ernest L. Johnston, Jr. 

The Journeyman — for a minimum of two years of exceptional service. 

Tommy C. Gaddie James A. Hefner Fannie P. Jamison 

Elbert Sloan 



The Cub — for one year of service. 



Cary Bell 
Ilka Bowditch 



Richard Davenport 
Louise Dudley 



Catherine Hinson 
Troy McMillan 
Myrna Spencer 



Honorable Mention. 

Marjorie D. Amos 
Mary E. Harper 



David Johnson 
Horace Wade 



Maxine Zachary 



Columbia Scholastic Press Association Award 
Staff Member Honor Award. 

Wilhelminia E. Harrison 



282 The Agricultural and Technical College 

Awards for Meritorious Service with the Richard B. Harrison Players. 

Henry Culmer Rachel Lewis Bobby Spencer 

William Graham Gaston Little Herman Thomas 

Lemuel Hillian Lavern Madison 

For Certificate of Merit in the James B. Dudley Chapter, Student Na- 
tional Education Association. 

Edith Crowder 

Honorable Mention for Meritorious Service with the Debating Team. 
Eugene Backmon Jack Ezzell Bobby B. Stafford 

A.LFRED CATLIN MARY E. HARPER 

Keys Awarded for Three Years of Meritorious Service in the Fortnightly 
Club. 

Cleveland Black William G. Wanendeya Bobby B. Stafford 

Glenwood Cooper David Johnson 

Two Scholarship Awards of $50 each presented by the Fortnightly Club 
to: 

Ilka C. Bowditch Shirley B. Dean 

The Fellowship Council Meritorius Service Awards for Four Years of 
Distinguished Service in Religious Activities. 

Pauline J. Brown Fannie B. Hilliard Ruth B. Liles 

Wilhelmina Harrison John C. Holley Daniel M. MdCrae 

Rosa Galloway Norman D. Jarrett William M. Reid 

James Hefner Clara M. Leach Madessa I. Willoughby 

Maxine Zachary 

The Fellowship Council Honorable Mention Awards for from One to 
Three Years Meritorius Service in Religious Activities 

Theodore R. Bunch Yvonne Griffin Glenwood L. Cooper 

Reginald K. Spence Mary E. Harper Richard T. Hill 

Betty R. Thompson Emma M. Debnam Cora Edmonds Bridgers 

Cleveland M. Black Rachel N. McKee Valeria Ingram 

LaRose E. Griffin Bobby B. Stafford 



Graduates 



285 



DEGREES CONFERRED 

June 2, 1962 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE 



*Neville Gideon Bembridge 
Bernard Blue Benson 
Charles Sotero Breeden 
Junious Douglas Brown 
Jesse Lee Council 
Fabian Lascelve H. Edman 
Mohammed Samba Fofana 
James Harson Koonce 
Richard M. Kelly 



fArthur Solomon Mangaroo 
fHuntley George Manhertz 
Edward Charlie Mills 
Johnny Chauncey Morris 
William C. Parker, II 
fVivian E. Robinson 
L'Overture I. Tulloch-Reid 
Moses Windley, Jr. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS 



Delores Jeanne Bryant 
Cora Burton 
Edith D. Crowder 
tPearl Daisy Maude Douce 
Patricia Ann Fulton 
Lillie Maude Harding 
Mildred Louise Hunter 
Rubye Mae Johnson 



Elizabeth Virginia Neal 
Gwendolyn Jeannette Nelson 
Bettye Jean Parker 
Henry Harold Richardson 
Myrna L. Spencer 
"Annie Jones Staton 
Richard Edward Walker 
Marian Harvey White 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE— BIOLOGY 



Thomas L. Bryant 
**Thomas James Carpenter 
Levi Coley 

Vernon Felton Copeland 
John H. Evans, III 
fJack Lamont Ezzell, Jr. 
*Rex Carrol Fortune, Jr. 
John Clifton Harris 



Fred Obediah Majors, Jr. 
George S. Marrow, Jr. 
William Rufus Overton 
Herbert Elwood Porter, II 
Bobby Edward Rogers 
David Surgeon, Jr. 
Franklin Ferdinand Wilson 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE— CHEMISTRY 

'George Arlington Lee Gant **Harry J. Wills, Jr. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



Lee D. Andrews 
George Howard Clemons 
Joe Louis Dudley 
David I. Glover 
Jimmie L. Hall 
Willie Harrison Land 



Robert Eddie Muldrow 
Madie Ruth Oliver 
William Motea Malcolm Reid 
William Franklin Russell 
Gloria A. Sanders 
Raymond Eugene Shipman 



* Cum Laude 

t Magna Cum Laude 

t Summa Cum Laude 

**NSF 



286 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS EDUCATION 



*Ruth Whitted Britt 
*Estella Virginia Coley 
Margaret Elizabeth Garrett 
Mae Ellen Greene 
Margaret Helen Hawley 
Helen Marie Jenkins 
Violet Ebun Lewis 
William Charles Marable 



Barbara Jean Oakley 
Dorothy Ann Parker 
Mable Savada Prince 
Susan Marie Hall Ruffin 
Geraldine Cheston Sims 
Carolyn Davis Steele 
Barbara Jean West 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING 



James Arthur Adams 
Alvin James Brown 
Willie Marcellus Manley 



Edward Marshall Murphy 
^Robert Murray, Jr. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 



Charles Benson Biyoyouwei 
George Edward Brown 
Gordon Fletcher Bullock 
Fred M. Dorsey 
*Chapin Horton 



Willie Jones 

Lynwood Gilmore McGoy 
Frank Alston Vines 
Theodore Robert Waddell, Jr. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



Robert Bogan 
Richard Charles Dorsey 
Hamlet Edward Goore 
Edward James 
Carlton Jenkins 



Ralph LeVaughn Miller 
R. T. Pettiford 
fNathan Lornell Rodgers 
Marvin Louis Sims, Jr. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 



Waymond F. Blassenbgale, Jr. 
Joe Frederick Bryant 
Adolphus Milton Coward, Jr. 
LeCogbill Friend 
William T. Hart 
Rogers James, Jr. 
Ralph Emerson Jones 



Walter Linwood Jones, Jr. 
Samuel Karmoh Lynch 
James Edward McLean 
Benjamin Moore 
Robert Rawlings, Jr. 
Randolph Taylor 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE— MATHEMATICS 



Ramseur DeVon Berry 
Elijah Linnell Booker 
fCarathene Crump 
Linnie Deroyal Fennell 



Reuben McKenley Hunter 
Walter L. Matthews 
Ivory James Moore 
William Douglas Vincent 



Richard Earl Barber 
Samuel Albert Byers 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE — PHYSICS 

George Alfred Scott 



* Cum Laude 

t Magna Cum Laude 

t Summa Cum Laude 

**NSF 



Graduates 



287 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN FINE ARTS 



Joyce Ann Cooper 
Maurice Delano Drake 
Paul Hughes 
Jerome Ingram 
Thomas McDowell, Jr. 



JPhilip Robinson 
Billy Thompson 
*Lula Mae Tisdale 
Curtis Lee Wilkerson 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE— SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

Carolyn Louise Craven Gwendolyn White 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE— ENGINEERING PHYSICS 



Norman L. Hoyle 

Norman David Jarrett, Jr. 



David Alfred Scott 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Glenwood Allen 
Henry Clay Alston 
Janet Anderson 
Matthew C. Barnhill 
*Diana Eugenia Bell 
Leslie Truesdell Bell 
fWilliam M. Bell, Jr. 
James 0. Bennett 
Roger Bennett 
Argaretta Best 
Ilka Carmen Bowditch 
Josephine Elsie Brown 
William Dubois Cheek 
Robert G. Clark 
Lequincy Cooper 
Jacquline Crittenden 
Arnold Lee Davis 
LaVerne Ella Mae Davis 
Marlene Dickens 
George Allen Dixon 
Mary Louise Dudley 
Freddie Michael Evans 
Ulysses Grant Exum 
Essu Nathaniel Faucette 
Don James Forney 
Odie Freeman 
Deanna D. Geter 
Vanderiyn J. Glinton 
*Gleen Leon Goore 
Harold Norman Graham 
Herbert Marshall Gray 
John Wesley Guthrie 
Bernard R. Haselrig 
Mary Delia Hawkins 
Shirley Marie Hester 
Susie B. Hinton 
Linda Carol Horton 
J. Jerbert Howell 
Veleria Ingram 
tJames Calvin Johnson 
Leonard Mangum Jones 



Katie Stancil Justice 
Harvey Gene Keaton 
Clarence Thompson Knight 
Purcell Knight 
Wellington H. Lampley 
Nellie M. Leach 
Laverne Madison 
Fred Othell Mashburn 
L. Marie McDonald 
Robert Allison McLean 
Cornelia Ann Merrick 
^Joseph Monroe 
Lawrence Olds 
-Ralph H. Parker 
James Thurman Parks 
Lillian Jamesena Parran 
Franklin Jerome Pullen 
Oliver H. A. Patterson 
Mary L. Roberson 
George C. Sanders 
*Enda E. Singletary 
Norris Spells 
James 0. Stephenson 
Roger W. Stevenson 
Nancy C Stewart 
Charles E. Stigger 
William T. Stokes 
Shirley M. Strickland 
Loria Lou Suggs 
*Laura J. Thomas 
Curtis Parker Todd 
Joseph C. Twitty 
Andrew Wallace 
James J. Ware, Jr. 
fMarva E. Whitely 
Arnold Lucious Wilson 
Johnice W. Wilson, Jr. 
Reginald C. Winstead 
Emily L. Woodard 
Elouise Wright 



* Cum Laude 

t Magna Cum Laude 

t Summa Cum Laude 

**NSF 



288 The Agricultural and Technical College 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING 

*Lois Anne Adamson Eva Mae Poole 

*Annie Baldwin Patsy N. Raper 

Sophia Bell Cherry Hilda Henry Smith 

*Marian D. Eason *Evelyn Koonce Williams 

*Fannie Lee May Shirley Ann Williamson 

Glenda Carol Mitchiner Barbara Ann Wise 

*Betty Jean Pierce 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

Prince B. Brown, B.S., A. and T. College 1937 

Jasper L. Coley, B.S., A. and T. College 1947 

Jesse John Lanier, B.S., A. and T. College 1935 

George King McKeathen, B.S., A. and T. College 1935 

Hughue Fred C. Simons, B.S., A. and T. College 1949 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Gordon Hancock Alexander, B.S., South Carolina State College .... 1948 

Calvin B. Chandler, B.S., A. and T. College 1954 

Burnel Elton Coulon, B.S., Tuskegee Institute 1953 

Willie Lee Hunter, B.S., Virginia State College 1955 

William Little, Jr., B.S., A. and T. College 1954 

Cardoze McCollum, B.S., A. and T. College 1946 

Samuel Oscar Paschall, B.S., A. and T. College 1949 

Howard Lee Ward, B.S., A. and T. College 1954 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

Dollie Ellison Andrews, B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College .... 1944 

James Foster Andrews, B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College .... 1949 

Cephus Nebraska Archie, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College .... 1954 

Rosetta Magett Adams, A.B., North Carolina College 1939 

Ruth Lomax Aikens, A.B., Allen University 1949 

Wynola Spencer Alexander, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College . . . 1946 

Annie Cooke Battle, A.B., Shaw University 1942 

James Winferd Beam, B.S., A. and T. College 1954 

Theresa Spaulding Best, B.S., Bennett College 1951 

Maggie Hardy Boone, B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College 1949 

Cora Macon Boulware, B.S., South Carolina State College 1947 

David Bratton, Jr., B.S., South Carolina State College 1957 

Lottie Louis Bridges, A.B., Johnson C. Smith University 1951 

Helene Hadassah Buck, B.S., A. and T. College 1957 

Hugh D. Bullock, Sr., B.S., A. and T. College 1948 

Mamie Neely Coker, B.S., Benedict College 

Sadie Princella D. Cunningham, B.S., A. and T. College 1949 



* Cum Laude 

t Magna Cum Laude 

t Summa Cum Laude 

**NSF 



Graduates 289 

Lucius E. Daniels, A.B., Morris College 1955 

Barbara Ann Dark, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College 1959 

Mary T. Dawson, B.S., A. and T. College 1955 

Mary Lois Parker Dickerson, A.B., Shaw University 1953 

Bessie Lee Dobson, B.S., Claflin University 1950 

Josephine Ardery Durant, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College . . . 1955 

Belton Hasty Edwards, B.S., A. and T. College 1959 

Lillian Davis Edwards, B.S., South Carolina State College 1954 

Rudolph Valentino Edwards, B.S., A. and T. College 1951 

Meacy Aretha Elmore, B.S., Barber Scotia College 1952 

Helen Casena Fairwell, B.S., Morris College 1952 

Clara Ida Flowers, B.S., A. and T. College 1958 

Veda Mae Ingram Flowers, B.S., A. and T. College 1952 

Dorothy Belle Floyd, B.S., Shaw University 1946 

Mary Hairston Foy, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College 1949 

Maggie Lewis Fulton, A.B.. Bennett College 1953 

Ruby Hausley Grandy, B.S., A. and T. College 1955 

Dorothy June Hairston, B.S., A. and T. College 1959 

James R. Hairston, B.A., Howard University 1961 

Louise Davis Hairston, B.A., Alabama State College 1949 

Lillian T. Hannar, B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College 1948 

Elfenia Williams Harris, B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College . . . 1950 

Princetta R. Harris, B.S., Barber Scotia College 1954 

Nathaniel Warmoth Hayes, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College . . . 1950 

Hattie Elizabeth Henderson, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College . . 1941 

Adeline R. Hodge, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College 1942 

Thomas Stone Holman, A.B., Livingston College 1942 

Horace Vincent Home, B.S., A. and T. College 1957 

Alpheus Booker Howell, B.S., A. and T. College 1953 

Helen R. Howell, A.B., Johnson C. Smith University 1954 

Alean Boone Jacobs, B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College 1950 

Clara H. James, B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College 1946 

Florence Jeffries, B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College 1955 

Mary Juanita Jeffries, B.S., Shaw University 1942 

Elva Watts Johnson, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College 1948 

Rosa L. Johnson, B.S., A. and T. College 1958 

Ida Mae Jones, A.B., Johnson C. Smith University 1939 

Martha Scott King, B.S., Morgan State Teachers College 1944 

Margaret G. Landon, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College 1958 

Herbert L. Lassiter, B.S., Elizabeth City State Teachers College .... 1940 

Ruth Ballentine Ledbetter, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College . . . 1947 

Amy Saunders Lutz, B.A., Johnson C. Smith University 1943 

Artimae Martin, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College 1949 

Cohildia Rebecca McKenzie Lyons, B.S., A. and T. College 1955 

Annie B. Herbin McClammy, B.S., A. and T. College 1947 

Walter A. McDaniel, B.S., Johnson C. Smith University 1956 

William Franklin Monroe, B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College. . 1955 

Lonnie A. Moose, B.A., Livingstone College 1956 

Ruth Jureatha Morris, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College 1943 



290 The Agricultural and Technical College 

Alvin Roosevelt Pierce, B.S., Johnson C. Smith University 1955 

Elijah Peterson, B.S., Livingstone College 1956 

Lorriane Jeanette Pruitt, B.S., Barber Scotia College 1955 

Martha Stephens Riley, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College 1954 

Addie Maude Robinson, B.S., A. and T. College 1948 

Catherine H. Robinson, A. B., Shaw University 1931 

Virgil Priestly Rochelle, B.S., A. and T. College 1951 

Velma Farrow Roland, B.S., A. and T. College 1953 

Marietta B. Rush, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College 1953 

James William Sanders, B.S., Benedict College 1951 

Ruby Corry Sanders, B.S., A. and T. College 1950 

Rosa Lee Scarborough, B.S., A. and T. College 1957 

Bernice Gatling Scott, B.S., Elizabeth City State Teachers College . . 1957 

Otha Lee Sherrill, Jr., B.S., A. and T. College 1954 

Christine Sessoms Smith, B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College . . . 1940 

Irene Elizabeth Smith, B.A., Shaw University 1949 

Ruth Edwards Smith, B.S., A. and T. College 1955 

Virginia Rountree Smith, B.S., Elizabeth State Teachers College .... 1944 

Willie Smith, Jr., B.S., A. and T. College 1951 

Rubye Harrison Solomon, B.S., A. and T. College 1950 

Juanita F. Spaulding, B.S., Wilberforce University 1931 

Enda Farmer Stanley, B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College 1948 

Beatrice Anderson Strayhorn, B.S., 

Elizabeth City State Teachers College 1947 

Christina Rossetti Norris Thompson, B.S., Knoxville College 1955 

Elaine Woody Thompson, B.S., Virginia State College 1948 

Lottie Davis Thompson, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College 1940 

Marcus Gavis Towmsand, B.S., A. and T. College 1949 

Leonard Frederick Turner, B.S., Howard University 1947 

Tishie Pearl Turner, B.S., A. and T. College 1952 

Lela Dorothy Wall, B.S., Shaw University 1955 

Hester Shortt Wallace, B.S., Hampton Institute 1945 

William Watson, B.S., A. and T. College 1950 

Novella Thompson Whitted, B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College 1957 

Ernest Williams, B.S., Elizabeth City State Teachers College 1953 

Lillie Ballentine Williams, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College .... 1946 

Willie R. Williams, III, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College 1956 

Arletha Winfield, B.S., Elizabeth City State Teachers College 1942 

Clinton A. Winslow, B.S., Elizabeth City State Teachers College 1941 

Theodore Aldophus Wood, B.S., A. and T. College 1954 

Fannie Sue Worley, B.S., A. and T. College 1955 

Rudolph Charles Worsley, B.A., Johnson C. Smith University 1955 

Carrye Lilly Wright, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College 1946 



Graduates 291 

DEGREES CONFERRED JUNE 1, 1962 

RANKING STUDENTS 

With Highest Honor Pearl Daisy Maude Douce 

With High Honor William McNeil Bell, Jr. 

With High Honor Carathene Crump 

With High Honor Jack Ezzell 

With High Honor James Calvin Johnson 

With High Honor Arthur Solomon Mangaroo 

With High Honor Huntley George Manhertz 

With High Honor Joseph Monroe 

With High Honor Vivian E. Robinson 

With High Honor Nathan Lornell Rodgers 

With High Honor Philip Rollinson 

With High Honor Marva L. Whitley 

With Honor Lois Anne Adamson 

With Honor Annie Pearl Baldwin 

With Honor Diane Eugenia Bell 

With Honor Neville B-embridge 

With Honor Ruth Whitted Britt 

With Honor Thomas James Carpenter 

With Honor Estella Virginia Coley 

With Honor Marian Davis Eason 

With Honor Rex Carroll Fortune, Jr. 

With Honor George Arlington Lee Gant 

With Honor Glenn Leon Gore 

With Honor Chapin Horton 

With Honor Fannie Lee May 

With Honor Robert Murray, Jr. 

With Honor Ralph H. Parker 

Wtih Honor Betty Jean Pierce 

With Honor Edna E. Singletary 

With Honor Annie Jones Staton 

With Honor Laura J. Thomas 

With Honor : Lula Mae Tisdale 

With Honor Evelyn Koonce Williams 



SECOND LIEUTENANTS COMMISSIONED 
IN THE UNITED STATES ARMY RESERVE 

Cadets Commissioned on June 2, 1962 

REGULAR ARMY APPOINTMENT & BRANCH 

*Rex C. Fortune, Jr. — *Bobby E. Rogers — 

Medical Service Corps Medical Service Corps 

*Chapin Horton — Artillery 



* Distinguished Military Graduates 



292 The Agricultural and Technical College 

UNITED STATES RESERVE APPOINTMENT & BRANCH 

*Richard E. Barber — Ordnance Andrew Wallace — Signal 

Waymond F. Blassengale — Infantry Harry J. Wills — Artillery 
George A. Dixon — Armour Arnold L. Wilson — MSC 

'"Norman L. Hoyle — Ordnance Walter Matthews — Artillery 

Raymond E. Shipman — Infantry 



Cadets Commissioned on March 6, 1 962 
UNITED STATES RESERVE APPOINTMENT & BRANCH 

James T. Parks — Infantry William M. M. Reid — Signal 



SECOND LIEUTENANTS COMMISSIONED 
IN THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE 

Cadets Commissioned on December 4, 1961 

^Robert E. Bogan Nathan L. Rodgers 

Carlton Jenkins 



David I. Glover 



Cadet Commissioned on April 1 962 



Cadets Commissioned on June 2, 1962 



*Jack L. Ezzell Edward M. Murphy 

Joseph Monroe 



GRADUATING SENIORS HOLDING MEMBERSHIP IN 
SCHOLASTIC AND SCIENTIFIC HONOR SOCIETIES 

ALPHA KAPPA MU HONOR SOCIETY 

Colors: Blue and White 

Carathene Crump Arthur S. Mangaroo 

Jack L. Ezzell Joseph Monroe 

George A. L. Gant Lula M. Tisdale 

KAPPA DELTA PI HONOR SOCIETY 
Colors: Jade Green and Violet 

Edith D. Crowder Cornelia A. Merrick 

PI OMEGA PI HONORARY BUSINESS SOCIETY 

Colors: Silver, Blue and Gold 

Ruth Britt Helen Jenkins 

Estella Coley Lillian J. Middleton 

Mae E. Greene Doris Parker 

Emma M. Head Clarence Richardson 

Jerry Hogan Iris Worley 



Distinguished Military Student 



Graduates 293 



SIGMA RHO SIGMA HONOR SOCIETY 

Colors: Red and White 

James C. Johnson Marva Louise Whitley 

Edna Earl Singletary 



DEGREES CONFERRED 

June 3, 1961 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE 

f Basil Glasford Coley Robert L. Lancaster 

Avant P. Coleman Willie L. Riddick, Jr. 

Aston Joseph DaCosta Edward Royster Roberts 

*McKinley Alfred DeShield, Jr. James E. Robinson 

Fred Edwards, Jr. Marvin Rountree 

John W. Green ^Reginald Keith Spence 

William Deprea Hood Ernest L. White, Jr. 
George Willis Koonce 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS 

Evelyn Benjamin *Gladys-Marie Morris 

Cora Edmond Bridgers Dorothy Albertha Saw 

Syrenia Delphine Bryant Carrena Mildred Smith 

Leola Dickens Betty Rose Thompson 

Rosa Galloway Emma Lee Joyce Williams 

Ethelyn Brinkley Hammond Madessa Lee Willoughby 

Rachel Naomi McKee Rosa Lee Wright 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE— BIOLOGY 

George Gorden Alston Robert Edward Holland 

Carl Louis Belfield Eric Von Jacobs 

Daniel Tyler Canada Climent C. Mills 

, \- Emmanuel Cooper Margaret Elaine Rutledge 

U Marion Cooper Robert Elliott Warwick 

Roscoe Davis Sullivan A. Welborne, Jr. 

*Roy DeVonne Flood Sheldon McCrea Wiggins 

DeRoy Gorham Clyde Evans Williams 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE— CHEMISTRY 

Miles Talmadge Bryant Calvin Jones Martin 

*Theodore Rudolph Bunch fjames O. Rice 

John C. Holley Robert Edward Sanders 

Roger Kenneth Horton Vallie Ruth Williams 



* Cum Laude 

t Magma Cum Laude 

t Summa Cum Laude 



■ ) 



294 The Agricultural and Technical College 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Lattice Askey, Jr. Willie Oscar Jones 

Walter Berry, Jr. Abner William McCorkle 

JJohn Lewis Cooper, Jr. Molton Smith, Jr. 

Reginald Hedgepeth William G. Wanendeya 

James Arthur Hefner Leonard M. Williams 
Eichard Thomas Hill 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS EDUCATION 

Catherine Beatty *Patricia Wanna Lee Isles 

Schirley Ann Belton Helen Ruth Lyles 

Bobbie E. Chavis Catherine Miller 

Ruby Lee Coston Ruth Martin Mitchell 

Emma Marie Debnam Mary Ellen Pickett 

Marzella Durant Geraldine S. Sapp 

Annie L. Everson Bettye Lou Summers 

Carrie A. Goodwin Dorothy Marie Brown Upsher 

Marjorie Graham Sadie Louise Willoughby 

Mildred LaJoie Howard fMaxine Zachary 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING 

Felix Coward James David Watson 

John Washington Glover John Allen Wilson 

Thomas K. Mosely 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

fjerome Baker Walter W. Pattishall 

Frank D. Banks James Clarence Powers 

George Beatty, Jr. Hinton Richardson 

Frank Edward Blasingame Albert Lee Rozier, Jr. 

Harold Emanuel Ferguson fEarnest Earl Sherrod 
Raymond Johnston Everett Wallace, Jr. 

Jefferson Cessely Love Walter Leroy Williams 

Thurman Alvester Melvin Richard Emory Worthey 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Willie Samuel Jacobs Matthew L. Minnicks 

James Edward Lash JPaul E. Parker 

James Reginald Lewis Isiah Wilson 

Daniel Morgan McCrae Robert Erwin Wilson 
George Caleb McLauchlin 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN FINE ARTS 

*Walter S. Harris Cordia Elma Simmons 



* Cum Laude 

t Magna Cum Laude 

t Summa Cum Laude 



Graduates 



295 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 



John Oscar Bigelow 
Earl Farrow 
Allen Bernard Garrison 
Roosevelt George, Jr. 
Augustus Haskins 
Linwood Earl Hawkins 
Vann H. McDonald 
Vinson Miller 



H Benny Franklin Mock 
Clarence L. Moore, Jr. 
Thomas Price 
William Roberts 
James Marvin Shaw 
James Otis Terry 
Reginald Thompson 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE— ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS 

Fannie Bell Hilliard 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE— MATHEMATICS 



Thomas L. Brown 
Johnnie C. Cheston 
Nora Jane Coviel 
fCurtis Eugene Dixon 
Katie B. Foye 



Joseph Green, Jr. 
Ed ware Eugene Hairston 
Willie Mathis Holmes 
Kenneth Southerland 
* Annie Ruth Withers 



James Albert Bass 
fWilliam Jenious Gavine 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE — ENGINEERING PHYSICS 

fWalter Thaniel Johnson, Jr. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE — PHYSICS 



Monroe Johnny Fuller 



James William McLendon 



Virginia Waugh Brown 
Anna Jane Scales 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE— SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

Helen Bloomfield Willis 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



^ 



Charles Arthur Alston 

Dorothy Jean Alston 

James Alphonso Alston 

Marjorie Delores Dudley Amos 

Hayswood Earle Atkins 

Edward Shelton Banks 

James Earl Barbour 

Larry Moseley Bell 

Cleveland M. Black 

James B. Black 
{James Franklin Blue, Jr. 

Vernice Ray Boone 

Margaret Louise Bradley 

Paul Eugene Brown 

James Lee Camp 

Laurastine Graham Chisholm 
*Glenwood Lee Cooper 

Joe Walter Council 



* Cum Laude 

t Magna Cum Laude 

t Summa Cum Laude 



Barbara Wilson Craig 

Raymon Edward Crawford 

Harold Eugene Daniel 

Donald William Edwards 

Louise Thelma Fairchild 
*Robert R. Faison 

James Edison Foster 

Theresa Louise Gibson 

Deloris Estella Gilliam 
. Annie Riddick Gordon 

LaRose Elizabeth Griffin 

Marilyn Yvonne Griffin 

Fulton Leron Gross 
JMary Edna Harper 

Ray Edward Harper, Jr. 

William Thomas Harper Harrison 
fWilhelminia Elizabeth Harrison 

Yvonne Hawkins 



296 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



*Robert Lee Hearst 
Aaron Winthrop Hill 
Joan Larue Holloway 
Joe Louis Holmond 
Tinnie Hooker 
Katherine Monzell Howard 
Clarence R. Howell 
Henry Devell Hunt 
Martha Ellen Hunter 
Fannie Peay Jamison 
Nathan Jenkins, Jr. 
David Johnson, Jr. 
Henry Joyner, Jr. 
Elizabeth P. Kelly 
William A. Kibler, Jr. 
Georgia Carroll Lane 
Ann Tomorrow Lassiter 
James Elmond Lee 
Council Lineberger, Jr. 
Bessie Marie Littlejohn 
Rufus Dewitt Lloyd 
Marilyn DeChantal Manns 
Charles Edward McCabe, Jr 
William Wayne McGee 
Burnie McQueen, Jr. 
Ruth Melvin 
Carrie Frances Millard 
Elizabeth Irene Minix 
Joseph Cleveland Mithener 



h 



Frank J. Norris 

Lloyd Oakley 

John Everett Page 

Otis L. Perry 

Jerome Patterson 

Wiley James Riggins, Jr. 

Lawrence N. Robinson 

Gordon Washington Rolle 

James Murphy Rouse 

Willie Hugh Rushing 
*Robert A. Scott 
*Frederick Shadding 

Isaac Smalls 

Bobby Breene Stafford 
*Pollard Luther Stanford, Jr. 

Thomas Alexander Sumlin 

Dorothy Bruner Swann 

Paul Raymond Swann 

Kimp P. Talley, Jr. 

Dorothy Juanita Tatum 

Jasper A. Thompson 

James Herman Twitty, Jr. 

Frederick Webb, Jr. 

Hoover Webb 

William Henry Whitaker 

Mae Catherine White 

Roy Dupree Wilkins 

Elouise Gore Young 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE NURSING 



Pauline J. Brown 

Johnnie Bell Bunch 

Elizabeth Godwin 

Osric Hargett 

Myra Dear Hewett 

Sandra Dorothy Montgomery Hicks 

Mary E. Frances Jamison 



Clara Mae Leach 

Ruth Bennett Liles 

Marie Waddell Martin 

Mable H. Mitchener 

Ruby Jean Pratt 

Lily P. Richardson 

Bett Jorintha Witherspoon 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

V. Basavaiah, B.S., Andhra University 1951 

Marshall Lee Champbell, B.S., A. and T. College 1939 

Raymond Pernell Smith, B.S., A. and T. College 1950 

Paul P. Thompson, B.S., Hampton Institute 1949 



■r, 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Obie Wardell Duren, B.S., A. and T. College 1952 

Anthony William Eubanks, B.S., A. and T. College 1957 



* Cum Laude 

t Magna Cum Laude 

% Summa Cum Laude 



Graduates 297 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

Margaret Vaughn Alexander, B.S., Winston- Salem Teachers College . . 1940 

Howard L. Alford, B.S., A. and T. College 1958 

William Daniel Alston, B.S., A. and T. College 1952 

Gladys Blanche Anderson, B.S., Hampton Institute 1928 

Loree Harris Anderson, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College 1952 

Mamie Willette Anderson, A.B., Talladega College 1927 

Daisy Lee Gore Atkinson, B.S., Benedict College 1954 

Vinnie Eggleton Baron, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College 1931 

Mildred Pearl Beaman, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College 1941 

Ozella Carolyne Beeks, B.S., South Carolina State College 1938 

Ernest Wilmington Bonner, A.B., Benedict College 1938 

Beatrice L. Bowser, B.S., Allen University 1949 

Lucy Sorecia Bradshaw, B.S., Shaw University 1935 

Delores Gladys Brewton, B.S., Benedict College 1953 

Edna Aldridge Bryant, B.S., Shaw University 1943 

Arabia Ethel Bunn, B.S., A. and T. College 1943 

Alice Knight Buress, B.S., Elizabeth City State Teachers College 1949 

Jonathan Campbell, B.S., Morgan State College 1947 

Blonnie Boykin Carr, B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College 1946 

Geraldine Duffield Cary, B.A., Knoxville College 1946 

Dimple Delois Chambers, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College 1950 

James Henry Coleman, B.S., Benedict College 1949 

Hyla Bynum Cundiff, B.A., Johnson C. Smith University 1948 

Callie Mary Louise Davis, B.S., Livingstone College 1952 

Geraldine Avery Dawson, A.B., Bennett College 1940 

Louise Moore Diggs, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College 1941 

Eva Thelma Dillard, B.S., Bluefield State College 1951 

Lam Perry Dillard, B.S., A. and T. College 1952 

Velma Hayes Friende, B.A., Winston-Salem Teachers College 1948 

Jessie Banks Gibson, B.S., A. and T. College 1951 

Doris Gunn Gilliam, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College 1953 

Helen Meadows Gooding, B.S., Elizabeth City State Teachers College . 1946 

Hiram Henderson Graham, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College . . 1952 

Eddie Mae Green, B.S., Morris College 1954 

Fleecy Mae Griffin, B.S., Livingstone College 1946 

Nancy Carbulena Garrett Griggs, B.S., Benedict College 1951 

John Lewis Hairston, B.S., A. and T. College 1951 

Marshall Carl Hairston, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College 1954 

Mary Long Hairston, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College 1945 

Willie Elizabeth Hall, B.S., A. and T. College 1959 

Willie Mae G. Hall, B.S., A. and T. College 1950 

Adeline John Hamlin, A.B., Shaw University 1952 

Lois Elizabeth Hauser, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College 1940 

Chester Cooper Hawkins, B.S., A. and T. College 1950 

Cozelle R. Hawkins, B.S., Bennett College 1937 

Otis Hannibal Augustus Hawkins, B.S., Johnson C. Smith University 1937 

Lyman B. Handerson, B.S., Shaw University 1933 



298 The Agricultural and Technical College 

Alder Carelock Henry, B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College .... 1945 

Oscar H. Hinnant, B.S., A. and T College 1946 

Larnetta Pauline Howell, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College .... 1946 

Mary Jones Jackson, B.A., Bennett College 1940 

Elouise Davis James, B.S., South Carolina State College 1955 

Naomi Clement Johnson, B.S.. Winston-Salem Teachers College 1941 

Luther Johnson, Jr., A.B., Benedict College 1950 

Ruth Braswell Jones, B.S., Elizabeth City Teachers College 1948 

Ruth Jones Kelly, B.S.. Bennett College 1948 

Arthur Keyes, B.S., A. and T. College 1957 

James Clinton Killian, B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College 1954 

Maryland James Kirby, B.S., Hampton Institute 1947 

Viola Johnson Knight, B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College 1943 

Myrtle Long Knox, A.B., Shaw University 1948 

Victoria Lambson, B.A., Shaw University 1953 

Crawford Ervin Lane, B.S., A. and T. College 1947 

Carrie Belle Patterson Lewis, B.S., Johnson C. Smith University 1953 

John W. Manning, A.B., Johnson C. Smith University 1952 

Creola M. Martin, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College 1954 

Melvernia Shurina Martin, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College .... 1953 

Margaret Campbell Matthews, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College . . 1945 

Wilhelminia Powell McCallum, B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College 1957 

Milton McLean, B.S., A. and T. College 1951 

Inez W. McNeil, B.S., South Carolina State A. and M. College 1938 

Thomas Howard Miller, B.S., A. and T. College 1951 

Essie Christine Payton Mills, B.S., Elizabeth City State Teachers College 1949 

Bleka Lindsay White Moore, B.S., A. and T. College 1952 

Ruth Virginia Moore, B.S., Elizabeth City State Teachers College .... 1949 

Vanell M. Moore, B.S., A. and T. College 1950 

Marion Lois Branch Morris, B.S., Shaw University 1931 

Gladys Williams Morrison, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College .... 1941 

Russell Eugene Murphy, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College .... 1955 

Rosa Ingram Paschall, B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College .... 1942 

Ida Mae Poston, A.B., Livingstone College 1952 

Lillian Peed Purvis, B.S., Elizabeth City State Teachers College 1949 

Edd Myrtle Pryor, B.S., Johnson C. Smith University 1945 

Gladys Mauney Robinson, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College .... 1939 

Sinclair Thomas Robinson, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College .... 1953 

Frances Lindsay Quick, B.A., Bennett College 1943 

Royal Nathaniel Roberts, B.S., A. and T. College 1950 

Julia Mary Woods Saunders, B.S., Morgan State College 1949 

Dorothy Brown Shaw, B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College .... 1948 

Frances Smith, B.S., Claflin College 1951 

Myrtle Henderson Smith, B.S., St. Pauls College 1952 

Tressie Sellers Springs, B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College .... 1947 

Levonia Streeter, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College 1944 

Alga Fondella Swann, B.S., A. and T. College 1951 

Douglas Waddell Taylor, Johnson C. Smith University 1959 

Capitalor Maureen Thomas, B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College . 1949 



Graduates 299 

Thelma Groves Turner, B.S., Bennett College 1942 

Edna E. Logan Twitty, B.S., Bennett College 1938 

Janie Juanita Brown Walker, B.S., Allen University 1957 

Merle A. Ward, B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College 1958 

Willa S. Buchanan West, B.S., Shaw University 1948 

Fred Wesley Whitfield, B.S., A. and T. College 1955 

Janol Corry Whitfield, B.S., Bennett College 1953 

Baxter Kelly Williams, B.S., Livingstone College 1950 

Corine Washington Williams, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College . 1952 

Theodore Williams, B.S., A. and T. College 1959 

Valdosia James Williams, B.S., Shaw University 1938 

William Womble, B.S., A. and T. College 1941 

Lois Williams Woodland, B.S., Knoxville College 1934 

Marienne Hooper Woods, B.S., Winston-Salem Teachers College .... 1946 

Bennie Roosevelt Wright, B.S., Fayetteville State Teachers College . . 1955 

Alfred Laurence Yeargin, B.A., Benedict College 1956 



RECIPIENTS OF HONORARY DEGREES 

DOCTOR OF HUMANE LETTERS 

warmoth t. gibbs 
James Carmichael Evans 

DOCTOR OF LAWS 

Whitney M. Young, Jr. 

DEGREES CONFERRED, JUNE 3, 1961 

RANKING STUDENTS 

With Highest Honor James Franklin Blue 

With Highest Honor John Lewis Cooper 

With Highest Honor Mary Edna Harper 

With Highest Honor Paul E. Parker 

With High Honor Jerome Baker 

With High Honor Basil G. Coley 

With High Honor Curtis E. Dixon 

With High Honor William J. Gavin 

With High Honor Wilhelminia E. Harrison 

With High Honor Walter T. Johnson 

With High Honor James 0. Rice 

With High Honor Earnest E. Sherrod 

With High Honor Maxine Zachary 

With Honor Johnnie Bell Bunch 



300 The Agricultural and Technical College 

With Honor Theodore R. Bunch 

With Honor Glenwood Cooper 

With Honor McKinley A. DeShields 

With Honor Robert R. Faison 

With Honor Roy D. Flood 

With Honor Robert Lee Hearst 

With Honor Walter S. Harris 

With Honor Edward E. Hairston 

With Honor Patricia W. Isles 

With Honor Clara Leach 

With Honor Benny F. Mock 

With Honor Gladys M. Morris 

With Honor Lily P. Richardson 

With Honor Robert A. Scott 

With Honor Frederick Shadding 

With Honor Reginald Spence 

With Honor Pollard L. Stanford 

With Honor Annie Ruth Withers 

With Honor Betty Jo Witherspoon 

SECOND LIEUTENANTS COMMISSIONED 
IN THE UNITED STATES ARMY RESERVE 

Cadets Commissioned on December 2, 1 960 

James E. Barbour Thurman A. Melvin 

Allen B. Garrison *Molton Smith, Jr. 

Cadets Commissioned on March 10, 1961 

Lattice Askew, Jr. Willie S. Jacobs 

*Bobbie E. Chavis *Matthew L. Minnicks 

Augustus Haskins James E. Robinson 

Cadets Commissioned on June 3, 1961 

*George G. Alston Raymond E. Crawford 

Hayward E. Atkins *Harold E. Daniel 
""George Beatty, Jr. Linwood E. Hawkins 

* Walter L. Berry, Jr. **Jchn C. Holley 

Cleveland M. Black Joe Louis Holmond 

*James B. Black Robert L. Lancaster 

*Paul E. Brown James E. Lash 

Glenwood L. Cooper 

SECOND LIEUTENANTS COMMISSIONED 
IN THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE 

Cadet Commissioned on December 2, 1 960 

Monroe J. Fuller 

Cadets Commissioned on March 10, 1961 

Joseph Green, Jr. Kimp T. Talley 



* Distinguished Military Students 
** Distinguished Military Graduate 



Graduates 301 

Cadets Commissioned on June 3, 1961 

Curtis E. Dixon ^Walter T. Johnson 

John W. Green Calvin J. Martin 

*Roger K. Horton Robert E. Sanders 

GRADUATING SENIORS HOLDING MEMBERSHIP IN SCHOLASTIC 
AND SCIENTIFIC HONOR SOCIETIES 
ALPHA KAPPA MU HONOR SOCIETY 

Colors: Blue and White 

James F. Blue James 0. Rice 

William J. Gavin Nathan Rodgers 

Mary E. Harper Ernest Sherrod 

Walter T. Johnson, Jr. Maxine Zachary 
Paul E. Parker 

BETA KAPPA CHI SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY 
Color: Gold 

Theodore Bunch John C. Holley 

William Gavin James Rice 

KAPPA DELTA PI HONOR SOCIETY 
Colors: Jade Green and Violet 

Cleveland M. Black Patricia W. L. Isles 

Katie B. Foye Helen R. Lyles 

Carrie A. Goodwin Bettyle L. Summers 

Mary E. Harper Dorothy M. B. Upsher 

Wilhelmina Harrison Maxine Zachary 

PI OMEGA HONORARY BUSINESS SOCIETY 
Colors: Silver, Blue and Gold 

Schirley A. Belton Helen R. Lyles 

Carrie A. Goodwin Dorothy B. Upsher 

Patricia W. Isles Maxine Zachary 

SCABBARD AND BLADE HONOR SOCIETY 

Hayswood Atkins Harold Daniel 

Walter L. Berry John C. Holley 

Raymond Crawford Robert L. Lancaster 

SIGMA RHO SIGMA HONOR SOCIETY 
Colors: Red and White 

Glenwood L. Cooper Robert A. Scott 

Robert R. Faison Frederick Shadding 

Robert Hearst Bobby B. Stafford 

David Johnson, Jr. Dorothv B. Swann 

Ruth B. Melvin Dorothv J. Tatum 

Gordon W. Rolle Pollard Stanford 



302 The Agricultural and Technical College 

ENROLLMENT BY COUNTIES IN NORTH CAROLINA 

1961-62 1962-63 

Alamance 55 63 

Alexander 6 9 

Anson 23 25 

Beaufort 24 27 

Bertie 24 23 

Bladen 27 28 

Brunswick 11 19 

Buncombe 29 27 

Burke 10 12 

Cabarrus 44 14 

Caldwell 11 10 

Camden 1 

Carteret 10 13 

Caswell 8 9 

Catawba 14 12 

Chatham 23 24 

Chowan . . . .' 8 5 

Cleveland 24 36 

Columbus 28 26 

Craven 24 28 

Cumberland 42 44 

Currituck 5 4 

Dare 1 1 

Davidson 21 19 

Davie 3 2 

Duplin 53 35 

Durham 33 38 

Edgecombe 52 58 

Forsyth 98 133 

Franklin 5 19 

Gaston 19 17 

Gates 3 

Granville 19 16 

Greene 11 14 

Guilford 445 514 

Graham 1 

Halifax 38 49 

Harnett 12 11 

Haywood 3 2 

Henderson 1 3 

Hertford 21 24 

Hoke 11 9 

Hyde 2 1 

Iredell 25 25 

Jackson 2 



Enrollment 303 

1961-62 1962-63 

Johnston 24 17 

Jones 21 16 

Lee 9 10 

Lenoir 39 26 

Lincoln 1 4 

Macon 1 1 

Madison 1 

Martin 32 32 

McDowell 3 

Mecklenburg 69 68 

Montgomery 16 9 

Moore 15 17 

Nash 29 17 

New Hanover 28 39 

Northampton 36 24 

Onslow 14 15 

Orange 16 32 

Pamlico 11 10 

Pasquotank 14 10 

Pender 23 18 

Perquimans 6 9 

Person 22 19 

Pitt 36 46 

Polk 1 3 

Randolph 26 21 

Richmond 24 65 

Roberson 43 37 

Rockingham 29 43 

Rowan 18 17 

Rutherford 13 34 

Sampson 29 32 

Scotland 15 12 

Stanley 29 8 

Stokes 2 

Surry 2 3 

Swain 1 

Transylvania 3 1 

Tyrrell 2 3 

Union 8 3 

Vance 27 34 

Wake 62 62 

Warren 14 10 

Washington 9 8 

Wayne 55 64 

Wilkes 8 9 

Wilson 28 19 

Yadkin 1 

TOTALS 2"^39 ~" 2,381 



304 The Agricultural and Technical College 

ENROLLMENT BY STATES 

1961-62 1962-63 

Alabama 5 6 

Arkansas 1 

California 1 1 

Colorada 1 

Connecticut 9 8 

Delaware 5 5 

District of Columbia 21 25 

Florida 35 32 

Georgia 36 34 

Illinois 3 2 

Kentucky 1 1 

Louisiana 2 

Maryland 9 13 

Massachusetts 2 2 

Michigan 2 1 

Minnesota 1 

Mississippi 2 1 

New Jersey 25 36 

New York 47 61 

NORTH CAROLINA 2,239 2,381 

Ohio 2 

Pennsylvania 15 24 

Rhode Island 3 3 

South Carolina 93 103 

Tennessee 1 2 

Texas 2 

Virginia 124 168 

Virgin Islands 2 3 

Canada 1 1 

India (New Delhi) 1 

East Africa 3 1 

West Africa 22 8 

West Indies (Jamaica) 21 11 

South America (British Guiana) 1 1 



TOTALS 2,732 2,940 



Enrollment 305 

SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT 

1961-62 1962-63 

Senior Class 444 

Junior Class 383 

Sophomore Class 560 

Freshman Class 1,007 

Special Students 98 

Graduate Students 240 

TOTALS 2,732 

Total Enrollment, excluding duplicates, 

regular session 2,732 

Summer Quarter, Undergraduate 1961 288 

Summer Quarter, Graduate 1961 1,132 

GRAND TOTALS 

1961-62, 1962-63, respectively 4,152 4,498 





412 




431 




711 




915 




162 




309 




2,940 




2,940 


1962 


358 


1962 


1,200 



INDEX 



A 

Academic Organization of the College 11 

Accounting 195 

Administration, Officers of 12 

Admission, Conditional 52 

Admission Procedure 51 

Admission Procedure, New Students 51 

Admission Requirements 52 

Admission, School of Nursing 52 

Admission to Graduate Study 244 

Agricultural Association, The 38 

Agricultural Business 66, 67 

Agricultural Economics and Rural 

Sociology, Dept. of 70 

Agricultural Education, Dept. of .... 74 

Agricultural Engineering Ill 

Agricultural Science 67, 68 

Agricultural Technology 68, 69 

Agriculture, General 70, 120 

Agriculture, School of 61 

Air Conditioning & Refrigeration 

Technology 265 

Air Force ROTC 267 

Air Science 273 

Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society 36 

Animal Husbandry 76, 118 

An ;>v ial Industry, Dept. of 76 

Anthropology 170 

AiciiiLe-Luial Engineering, Dept. of . . 186 

Army ROTC 267 

Army ROTC Cadet Welfare Council . . 40 

Art, Dept. of 40 

Art Circle 189 

Athletic Association, Women's 35 

Athletics Program, The 35 

Audio- Visual Center, The 31 

Auditors 46 

Auto Mechanics 251 

Auto Body 251 

Automotive Technology 250 

Awards 42, 43 

B 

Bacteriology 84 

Band, ROTC 41 

Bands, The College 39 

Beta Kappa Chi 36 

Biology, Dept. of 81 

Biological Science 84 

Board of Education 10 

Board of Higher Education 10 

Board of Trustees 10 

Botany 85 

Building Construction Technology .... 253 

Business, Dept. of 193 

Business Administration 195, 206 

Business Education 202,208 

Business, General 196 

c 

Calendar, College 6 

Changes in Schedules 56 

Changing Schools 56 

Chemistry 89 

Choral Organizations 39 

Class Attendance 56 

Classification of Students 54 

Clothing, Textiles and Related Art 97, 105 

College 4-H Club 38 

College Rifle Team 41 

Collegiate NFA Club 38 

Credentials, Filing of 54 

Crop, Soil and Earth Science 113 



D 

Dairy Husbandry 78, 118 

Dance Group, The 40 

Debating Society, The 39 

Degrees 58 

Degree and Graduation Requirements 57 

Deportment 44 

Drafting Technology 257 

Driver Education 266 

E 

Economics 170 

Education 128, 129 

Education and Psychology, Dept. of 127 
Education & Gen'l Studies, School 

of 123, 125 

Education Business 199, 208 

Education, Special 137 

Electrical Engineering 210 

Electrical Technology 258 

Electricity, Industrial 259 

Engineering, Agricultural Ill 

Engineering, Architectural 186 

Engineering, Electrical 210 

Engineering, Mechanical 226 

Engineering Physics 230 

Engineering, School of 183 

English, Dept. of 137 

Enrollment 302 

Entrance Units 52 

Evening Classes, The 31 

Examinations, Quarterly 56 

Expenses, General 45 

F 

Failure 56 

Farm Mechanics 119 

Fees, Summer School 46 

Fees, Veterans 47 

Financial Information 45 

Floriculture 115, 119 

Food Services 34 

Foods & Nutrition 98, 107 

Foreign Language Clubs 39 

Foreign Languages, Dept. of 146 

Fortnightly Club, The 39 

Fraternities 38 

French 147 

Freshman Composition 141 

G 

General Expenses 45 

General Science 86 

Geography 171 

Geology 114, 171 

German 149 

Grades, Failures 56 

Grades, Incompletes 57 

Grading System 65 

QiiuiUHte bchool, The 243 

Graduates 283 

Graduation Requirements 57, 60, 125 

Graduation with honors 58 

Guidance 135 

Guidance Services 32 

Graduation Under a Particular Catalog 60 

H 

Health 158, 163, 168 

Health Services 33 



308 



The Agricultural and Technical College 



Historical Statement 5 

History 171, 178, 181 

Home Economics, Dept. of 65, 96 

Home Economics Education 99, 108 

Honor Roll 57 

Honor Societies 36 

Honorary Degree 299 

Honors, Graduation with 299 

Horticulture 115 

Housing 33 

Humanities 145 

I 

Incompletes 57 

Industrial Arts 213 

Industrial Education 219 

Industrial Education, Dept. of 213 

Industrial Education, Vocational .... 213 

Industrial Electricity 259 

Industrial Education Technical 

Option 214 

Industrial Electronics 259 

Institution Management 101, 109 

Institutional Memberships 29 

Instruction, Officers of 12 

Intramural Athletics 35 

Insurance 198 

K 

Kappa Delta Phi 37 

Kappa Epsilon Society 37 

Kappa Pi 37 

L 

Landscape Gardening 120 

Language and Composition 141 

Lettermen's Club 35 

Literature 143 

Loans 41 

Loan Fund, Student 44 

Loan Program, National Defense 

Student 44 

Location 29 

M 

Mathematics 221 

Mechanical Engineering 226 

Mechanical Technology 263 

Medals 43 

Memberships, Institutional 29 

Military Science 269 

Music, Applied 156 

Mu3ic, Dept. of 151 

Music Education 158 

Music, Theory 154 

Music, Literature 155 



N 

National Defense Student Loan 

Program 44 

Nurse Organizations, Student 40 

Nursery School & Kindergarten 

Education 103,110 

Nursing, School of 235 

o 

Officers of Administration 12 

Officers of Instruction 12 

Omega Pi, National Bus. Ed. 

Fraternity 37 

Out-of-State Student Fees 45, 46 

Organizations and Activities, Student 34 



P 

Pan-Hellenic Council 38 

Payment of Fees, Korean Veterans . . 47 

Payments-tuition-dates of 46 

P.E.M. Club, The 40 

Pershing Rifles 41 

Physical Education 159 

Physical Education, Dept. of Health 

and 158 

Physical Plant 29 

Physical Science 95 

Physics 230 

Physics, Engineering 232 

Pi Delta Phi, National French 

Honor Society 37 

Placement Services 34 

Plant Science and Technology, Dept. of 111 

Political Science 173 

Poultry Husbandry 79, 120 

Prizes 41 

Prizes and Awards 279 

Psychology 130, 135 

Q 

Quarterly Examinations 56 

R 

Radio- Television Servicing 258 

Reading, Developmental 141 

Re-admission of Former Students .... 54 

Recreation 164, 177 

Refrigeration Technology 265 

Refunds 46 

Registration 54 

Rehabilitation Corp. Student Loan 

Prog., N. C. Rural 44 

Related Services Staff 21 

Religious Organizations & Activities . . 35 

Reserve Officers Training Corps 267 

Richard B. Harrison Players, The 39 

Rifle Team, College 41 

ROTC, Air Force 269 

ROTC, Army 267 

ROTC Band 41 

ROTC Officer's Club 41 

S 

Scabbard and Blade, National Society 

of 41 

Schedule, changes in 56 

Scholastic Requirements 55 

Scholarships 41 

Schools, changing (within College) . . 56 
Secondary School Teachers, 

education of 128 

Secretarial Science 204, 209 

Self-help 47 

Short Courses, Dept. of 117 

Sigma Rho Sigma Recognition Society 36 

Social Sciences, Dept. of 169 

Social Studies 169, 178, 181 

Social Welfare 179 

Sociology 174, 180 

Sororities 38 

Spanish 150 

Special Education 137 

Special Fees and Deposits 45 

Special Students 53 

Speech and Drama 140, 142 

Student Government 34 

Student Load and Scholastic 

Standards 55 

Student Loan Fund 44 

Student Nurse Crganization, The . . 40 

Student Organizations & Activities . . 34 

Student Personnel Services 32 



Index 



309 



Student Publications 35 

Students, Classification of 54 

Students, Special 53 

Students, Transfer 53 

Stylus, The 39 

Summer School 31 

Summer School Fees 46 

T 

Teacher Education Admission and 

Retention Standards 131 

Technical Institute, The 247 

Transfer Students 53 

Trustees, Board of 10 

Tuition Fees and Charges for Regular 

Session Nine Months Term 45 



V 

Varsity Athletics 35 

Veterans 47 

Veterans, Fees of 47 



w 



Withdrawal from College 
Women's Athletic Association 



X, Y, Z 



Zoology